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Now take off the hatred hats, and forget about everything he did with WCW and TNA. And think back for a moment. The moment is......1999 when it was announced that the head writer for the WWF, the company that was kicking WCW's ass lately, was making the jump and going to be the new head writer for WCW.

For all of the WCW fans in here. Where you excited? Did you believe that because of what he was doing with the WWF, that he was going to help you guys and go back to being on top? Or did you feel like it was a conspiracy from the get go? A conspiracy from the WWF to send Russo in and sabotage WCW into the ground even more?

I would imagine that this was before the hatred of Russo. And that maybe a lot of WCW fans were excited. But I could be wrong.
 

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I'll answer the question from a WWF fan perspective.

I was terrified! Believe it or not, Russo was an internet darling back then. General consensus at the time was that Russo had the magic touch and things were about to get a whole lot more interesting.
 

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I remember hearing a bit about Russo but his accomplishments weren't so easy to pick up on until *after* he went to WCW and started telling his stories. There was definitely intrigue, at least for myself, but I was in a position where I loved WCW but it was getting really bad and I was just curious as to see what Russo exactly was going to do. It seemed in all likely hood that WCW was still going to flop, at least in my opinion, as it was hard to breath fresh life into a roster full of so many old guys that were doing very little but getting paid a lot, and had the power to keep it that way. WCW pretty much felt like a sinking ship, it was clear that the WWF was pulling away with the fans, and very very fast.

Still, there was definitely hope that WCW could get better.... it just seemed every time they did one thing right, they'd screw up 4 other things in the process.
 

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I'm gonna be perfectly honest.


This is 1999. I didn't know what a creative/booking team was. Hell, I didn't know what booking was. I didn't know that there was a group of guys that wrote all the shit I was seeing, I didn't have Internet and the magazines I was reading, for the most part, didn't reveal that kind of information. Hotlines lied to me so much, so I quit dealing with them. Plus, it costed a lot of money.


I didn't know who Vince Russo was until he appeared on TV in 2000 and in retrospect, was when I found out he worked for WWE. As a 13 year old kid, I always thought Vince was the boss. Before that, I thought it was Jack Tunney.


So, I can't say that, as a kid, I felt one way or another about Russo coming in, as I didn't even know who he was until his second run with the company and it's only in retrospect that I found out he worked there in 1999.


When he first appeared in April of 2000, I just viewed him as another bad guy and had no clue he was "writing the show" or that he wrote for WWE because as a kid, I didn't care enough to seek out that kind of information, nor did I have the resources to do such a thing.




I figured it was like that with the vast majority of people, at least on this forum. I'm pretty sure some of us were kids and didn't possess the "knowledge" we have now about wrestling. At least that's how I was.
 

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Optimism. The way Bischoff was handling WCW by 1999 was horrendous and the quality took an incredibly sharp dip that year. After blowing whatever good will they had after Starrcade '97 on Starrcade '98 and the Finger Poke of Doom, WCW was grasping at straws with Hogan pinning Flair at SuperBrawl '99 and the meaningless Hogan/Flair double turn at Uncensored '99. They picked up a little bit at Spring Stampede '99 by giving DDP the belt but then involved Nash in the scene and killed whatever momentum they could have gained from that. Then, Hogan came back in the red and yellow to low fanfare only leading to a failed Sting heel turn.

Bischoff and whoever was managing WCW creatively made every conceivable wrong move you could, and ratings and attendance dwindled in 1999 leading to him being fired. He blames Time Warner management, but if you look at the sharp decline of numbers from 1998 to 1999, and who was in charge, you could see someone who was failing to keep up with the competition. Bischoff says WCW needed to be edgier to compete with Attitude, but I disagree. They could be edgy while still being PG. The nWo was evidence of that.


So, when Russo was brought in, and Bischoff was deservedly fired, there was hope that the same guy who wrote the Austin/McMahon feud and the brilliantly booked Survivor Series '98 could book successful stories that could compete with Vince. Of course, this was also the guy who wrote the failed "Higher Power" angle and got really goofy with midcard gimmicks in '99. I think that's more what WCW wound up getting in the end.


For the first month or so, I really enjoyed what he did with WCW. That first Nitro when he took over was great, and the idea of doing a mega 32-man tournament to get the belt on Bret Hart was really well done. Even upper mid-card feuds like Sting/Luger were pretty well booked and he started to rebuild Goldberg in a good way.

Then, he started to tease a "Major" angle... and it was reforming the nWo with Bret, Jarrett, and the Outsiders, and that's when it all fell apart for me. The nonsensical booking of Piper as the guest ref at Starrcade '99, the insistence of involving the "Powers that Be" (which was really Russo himself) in the storylines was really dumb and was just him trying to ape involving management like the WWF was doing. It made sense for Vince to be an on-screen villain, much less so for the "writers" of WCW programming to be.

Had he just kept to writing great stories around Goldberg, Bret, Sting, Benoit, and the top level stars in WCW, and keeping the focus on THEM and not himself, had he not built up a major angle that wound up being a rehash, he would have created some quality programming that may not have done as well as the WWF, but still could have provided meaningful competition that I believe would have done better in the end.

Unfortunately, he just wanted to bring the nWo back.
 

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I'm gonna be perfectly honest.


This is 1999. I didn't know what a creative/booking team was. Hell, I didn't know what booking was. I didn't know that there was a group of guys that wrote all the shit I was seeing, I didn't have Internet and the magazines I was reading, for the most part, didn't reveal that kind of information. Hotlines lied to me so much, so I quit dealing with them. Plus, it costed a lot of money.


I didn't know who Vince Russo was until he appeared on TV in 2000 and in retrospect, was when I found out he worked for WWE. As a 13 year old kid, I always thought Vince was the boss. Before that, I thought it was Jack Tunney.


So, I can't say that, as a kid, I felt one way or another about Russo coming in, as I didn't even know who he was until his second run with the company and it's only in retrospect that I found out he worked there in 1999.


When he first appeared in April of 2000, I just viewed him as another bad guy and had no clue he was "writing the show" or that he wrote for WWE because as a kid, I didn't care enough to seek out that kind of information, nor did I have the resources to do such a thing.




I figured it was like that with the vast majority of people, at least on this forum. I'm pretty sure some of us were kids and didn't possess the "knowledge" we have now about wrestling. At least that's how I was.
I can agree with this statement 100%. I was about a year younger than you. DIdn't have a CLUE that there were writing teams. I remember knowing wrestling was "fake" but not knowing any of the inside shit at this age. When i had AOL 5.0 for years I would get emails from "worldwrestlingnewsletter" or somethign like that. I never opened the emails cause I was stupid and though everythign was a virus more or less lol. Anyway, in like 2002 I finally opened them after I quit watching wrestling for a year and that pretty much introduced me to dirtsheets and rumor sites.
 

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I did wrestle zone and the gamefaqs wrestling forums for most of my insider wrestling knowledge - I hear wrestle zone has a REALLY bad reputation these days, but back then it was very accurate in a lot of cases.
 

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I'm gonna be perfectly honest.


This is 1999. I didn't know what a creative/booking team was. Hell, I didn't know what booking was. I didn't know that there was a group of guys that wrote all the shit I was seeing, I didn't have Internet and the magazines I was reading, for the most part, didn't reveal that kind of information. Hotlines lied to me so much, so I quit dealing with them. Plus, it costed a lot of money.


I didn't know who Vince Russo was until he appeared on TV in 2000 and in retrospect, was when I found out he worked for WWE. As a 13 year old kid, I always thought Vince was the boss. Before that, I thought it was Jack Tunney.


So, I can't say that, as a kid, I felt one way or another about Russo coming in, as I didn't even know who he was until his second run with the company and it's only in retrospect that I found out he worked there in 1999.


When he first appeared in April of 2000, I just viewed him as another bad guy and had no clue he was "writing the show" or that he wrote for WWE because as a kid, I didn't care enough to seek out that kind of information, nor did I have the resources to do such a thing.




I figured it was like that with the vast majority of people, at least on this forum. I'm pretty sure some of us were kids and didn't possess the "knowledge" we have now about wrestling. At least that's how I was.
Exactly this.

Sent from Verticalsports.com Free App
 

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I really didn't know any WCW fans by that point aside from my middle-aged uncle who didn't like WWF because they "cussed too damn much". And I think he quit watching shortly after Russo took over.

But I had a few friends who liked WCW alot more after Russo took over, and thought it was a huge improvement. But they weren't "WCW fans", just fans of Russo-style crash TV.
 

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I'm gonna be perfectly honest.


This is 1999. I didn't know what a creative/booking team was. Hell, I didn't know what booking was. I didn't know that there was a group of guys that wrote all the shit I was seeing, I didn't have Internet and the magazines I was reading, for the most part, didn't reveal that kind of information. Hotlines lied to me so much, so I quit dealing with them. Plus, it costed a lot of money.


I didn't know who Vince Russo was until he appeared on TV in 2000 and in retrospect, was when I found out he worked for WWE. As a 13 year old kid, I always thought Vince was the boss. Before that, I thought it was Jack Tunney.


So, I can't say that, as a kid, I felt one way or another about Russo coming in, as I didn't even know who he was until his second run with the company and it's only in retrospect that I found out he worked there in 1999.


When he first appeared in April of 2000, I just viewed him as another bad guy and had no clue he was "writing the show" or that he wrote for WWE because as a kid, I didn't care enough to seek out that kind of information, nor did I have the resources to do such a thing.




I figured it was like that with the vast majority of people, at least on this forum. I'm pretty sure some of us were kids and didn't possess the "knowledge" we have now about wrestling. At least that's how I was.
This goes to show how retarded those storylines Russo booked in WCW exposing the business were. He says that everybody knew it was fake and the show was written beforehand so he had Buff Bagwell do "jobs" and ask the booker if he did good on TV. He booked that stupid Goldberg angle with him refusing to do the job and he went against the script. This is 2000, not fuckin' 2008 or something, clearly most people weren't on the internet yet looking on wrestling message boards. Hell, you didn't even know who Russo was and what a booker was and here's Russo exposing the business on national TV. Stupid.
 

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To be honest, I missed the headline that Russo & Ferrara jumped ship. I watched Raw & Nitro back then on german television who didn't show the Monday shows live so I watched first the Raw tapings and then Nitro.
So I watched the first Nitro by Russo & Ferrara and I noticed the change in a positive way. I said to myself "Finally WCW realized what it takes to compete with WWE" without noticing that the guys who wrote shows for WWE are the same guys who started writing for WCW.

I didn't know in the late 99 that Russo and Ferrara were in charge but I thought it was just as cool as the Raw shows. When I realized it were the same guys I realized that they should take full credit when it comes to Attitude Era because the late 99 and 2000 WCW shows looked exactly liked the WWE 98 & 99 shows but the WWE year 2000 with Vince McMahon full in charge (many people give him credit or call him a filter) had nothing to do with WWE 98 & 99 shows.
This goes to show how retarded those storylines Russo booked in WCW exposing the business were. He says that everybody knew it was fake and the show was written beforehand so he had Buff Bagwell do "jobs" and ask the booker if he did good on TV. He booked that stupid Goldberg angle with him refusing to do the job and he went against the script. This is 2000, not fuckin' 2008 or something, clearly most people weren't on the internet yet looking on wrestling message boards. Hell, you didn't even know who Russo was and what a booker was and here's Russo exposing the business on national TV. Stupid.
Funny how you ignore that the same thing happened in WWE before and you act like the business was exposed in WCW.
Ken Shamrock calling Undertaker "Mark", Vince McMahon saying that The Undertaker took his character too far, Marc Mero calling Tom Brandi a jobber, The J.O.B. Squad and their catchphrases like "Pin me, pay me", interview with Chaz and Michael Cole with Cole mentioning on TV that Chaz broke character, the whole worked shoots interviews on Raw during the Russo era and zillion other things.
Where is the difference between Buff Bagwell asking if he did a good "job" in WCW and Al Snow wearing a shirt in WWE saying "1-2-3 4 Life"?
The J.O.B. Squad was a well-received stable and all the stuff in WWE were cool but suddenly the same stuff sucked in WCW because "TEH EVIL RUZZO KILLEZ BUZINEZZ"

The wrestling fans are a bunch of hypocrites who praise the Attitude Era but shit on WCW & TNA Russo booking.

If Russo stayed in WWE in 2000 you would all jizz in your pants looking at the picture of WWE champion David Arquette & Stone Cold beer bash after Austin gave Triple H the stunner and laying Arquette on top of him for the win and you all know I'm right
 

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I genuinely thought he'd give the company a shot in the arm and stop the decline. After all he'd played a large part in turning the tables for the WWF.
 

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I was born a WWF/WWE lifer, but I also watched WCW in their hot years (96-99, around there). Somehow I knew that Russo booking that company just wouldn't translate. There was an obvious difference between the two products. The WWF was in full "male soap opera" mode, where Russo could excel when he wanted to, but even with shades of its own Attitude Era, I always saw WCW as a "wrasslin'" company with a Southern, good-ole-boy mentality.

And of course, we all know how Russo's time in Dubya C Dubya ended up. :D
 

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This goes to show how retarded those storylines Russo booked in WCW exposing the business were. He says that everybody knew it was fake and the show was written beforehand so he had Buff Bagwell do "jobs" and ask the booker if he did good on TV. He booked that stupid Goldberg angle with him refusing to do the job and he went against the script. This is 2000, not fuckin' 2008 or something, clearly most people weren't on the internet yet looking on wrestling message boards. Hell, you didn't even know who Russo was and what a booker was and here's Russo exposing the business on national TV. Stupid.
To be fair, Russo was right about the internet rapidly making fans smart, I know there's some people here that didn't know about booking teams and that stuff, but if you went on the internet at all, even back then it consisted of a huge amount of smarks on virtually any sight besides the official WCW or WWF pages themselves.
 

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Funny how you ignore that the same thing happened in WWE before and you act like the business was exposed in WCW.
Ken Shamrock calling Undertaker "Mark", Vince McMahon saying that The Undertaker took his character too far, Marc Mero calling Tom Brandi a jobber, The J.O.B. Squad and their catchphrases like "Pin me, pay me", interview with Chaz and Michael Cole with Cole mentioning on TV that Chaz broke character, the whole worked shoots interviews on Raw during the Russo era and zillion other things.
Where is the difference between Buff Bagwell asking if he did a good "job" in WCW and Al Snow wearing a shirt in WWE saying "1-2-3 4 Life"?
The J.O.B. Squad was a well-received stable and all the stuff in WWE were cool but suddenly the same stuff sucked in WCW because "TEH EVIL RUZZO KILLEZ BUZINEZZ"

The wrestling fans are a bunch of hypocrites who praise the Attitude Era but shit on WCW & TNA Russo booking.

If Russo stayed in WWE in 2000 you would all jizz in your pants looking at the picture of WWE champion David Arquette & Stone Cold beer bash after Austin gave Triple H the stunner and laying Arquette on top of him for the win and you all know I'm right
I'm not a Russo fan. But, I won't go out of my way to bash him, which seems to be the running theme in the IWC.

And people go along with that running theme, without forming their own opinion or using an ounce of logic.



The reason why what Russo did in WWE worked was because everybody there was a team player. They wanted the company to grow, protect their livelihood and secure their families. Because, if you're Gillberg, you want Austin to be at his best because that's benefiting you.

The reason it didn't work in WCW or TNA was because of the egos involved. They didn't care about the company, they only cared about themselves and their status within the company.

You can't praise the man for what he did in WWE but bash him for doing the same thing in WCW & TNA. They wanted him to do what he did in WWE, that was the only reason he was brought in.



And people need to dig deeper. George South, Ole Anderson, Ric Flair, Dusty Rhodes, Bill Watts, Kevin Sullivan, Terry Taylor, Jimmy Hart, Johnny Ace, Eric Bischoff, Jim Crockett Jr, Jim Herd, Kip Frye and several others I'm forgetting, were all bookers/writers for WCW at one point or another. All of them were removed at one point or another.



So that begs the question. Were these dozen or so bookers/writers all bad for business, considering they were successful booking/writing elsewhere (except Bischoff, Herd & Frye)? Or is the problem the environment they were working in or the talent they were working with?

Because if you bash Russo for his WWE ideas failing in WCW, bash George South for his WWE ideas not working in WCW, Ole Anderson for his Georgia ideas not working in WCW, Dusty Rhodes for his Florida ideas not working elsewhere or Bischoff for his 1997 ideas not working in 1999.


A leopard is not going to change it's spots. When you've achieved so much success producing a certain type of television and that's the reason you were hired in the first place, removed and brought back again, it's obvious your ideas aren't bad (you wouldn't have gotten the job in the first place), the problem is the people you're writing for now don't like being told what to do and as per their contract, they don't have to be.

Russo was doomed from day one and people need to realize that. It wasn't because of his "horrible booking", as his booking wasn't horrible at all, it was because of a lack of wanting to work as a team from within the company.




And if you bash Russo for TNA's booking, you need to split that blame between him, Terry Taylor, Jeff Jarrett & Zeb Colter because Russo wasn't the lone wolf, he was part of a team. And in that regard, it can be argued that once Terry Taylor left and Jeff Jarrett lost power, the company improved. So, people need to really think about what they're saying before blindly bashing Russo. And I'm not endorsing him, I'm just saying he's not as bad as people make him out to be.







And fans were smart to the business, on a larger stage, as far back as 1997. Just watched Canadian Stampede and there's a fan walking back & forth with a sign that said "What's Kayfabe???". I didn't know what kayfabe meant until about 6 years later. And even before that, the ECW fans were largely in the know. They used to have Internet conventions for fans. So, Russo obviously saw the Internet rising and knew what the result would be. You can't leave those fans the way they are, as they'll spoil it for the rest. Instead, you "work" the smarks because a mark is going to mark regardless. And if Russo didn't do it, somebody else would have done it. Heyman knew what was up and kept 100 with the fans. Because if you didn't, the Internet was going to kill the business. You couldn't pretend it didn't exist, it was growing and would have had a negative effect on wrestling unless they grew with it and to his credit, Russo did.
 

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I remember Russo being an IWC darling at the time and the IWC being excited about the jump to WCW. I think the true old school NWA/WCW pro rasslin' fan would have been terrified if they knew what was coming. Russo probably stood for everything they didn't like about pro wrestling but I'm not sure that portion of the fan base was very internet savvy at the time or knew what was coming.
 

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From what I remember, it was legit concern from WWF fans that Russo was going to right the ship. WCW fans had optimism about it.

Obviously we all found out what happened when Russo had no filter to stop him from doing really stupid angles. Russo has some really great ideas, but he also has some really ridiculous ideas that overshadow the good ones. That is why he needs someone to veto his ideas, and why he worked so well in the WWF; Vince oversaw every angle, so he could veto the bad ideas. Not to say none slipped through (Beaver Cleavage?), but overall, Vince kept him on a leash.
 

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Just wrong.

You could sense it the first nitro when he came in.

It just was to edgy for the casual wrestling fan.

Vince Russo loved "Shoot-work-angles" Jerry Springer wrestling show.

We never thought that Russo would kill WCW as much as he did though...

It was a mess.
 

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I'm not a Russo fan. But, I won't go out of my way to bash him, which seems to be the running theme in the IWC.

And people go along with that running theme, without forming their own opinion or using an ounce of logic.



The reason why what Russo did in WWE worked was because everybody there was a team player. They wanted the company to grow, protect their livelihood and secure their families. Because, if you're Gillberg, you want Austin to be at his best because that's benefiting you.

The reason it didn't work in WCW or TNA was because of the egos involved. They didn't care about the company, they only cared about themselves and their status within the company.

You can't praise the man for what he did in WWE but bash him for doing the same thing in WCW & TNA. They wanted him to do what he did in WWE, that was the only reason he was brought in.



And people need to dig deeper. George South, Ole Anderson, Ric Flair, Dusty Rhodes, Bill Watts, Kevin Sullivan, Terry Taylor, Jimmy Hart, Johnny Ace, Eric Bischoff, Jim Crockett Jr, Jim Herd, Kip Frye and several others I'm forgetting, were all bookers/writers for WCW at one point or another. All of them were removed at one point or another.



So that begs the question. Were these dozen or so bookers/writers all bad for business, considering they were successful booking/writing elsewhere (except Bischoff, Herd & Frye)? Or is the problem the environment they were working in or the talent they were working with?

Because if you bash Russo for his WWE ideas failing in WCW, bash George South for his WWE ideas not working in WCW, Ole Anderson for his Georgia ideas not working in WCW, Dusty Rhodes for his Florida ideas not working elsewhere or Bischoff for his 1997 ideas not working in 1999.


A leopard is not going to change it's spots. When you've achieved so much success producing a certain type of television and that's the reason you were hired in the first place, removed and brought back again, it's obvious your ideas aren't bad (you wouldn't have gotten the job in the first place), the problem is the people you're writing for now don't like being told what to do and as per their contract, they don't have to be.

Russo was doomed from day one and people need to realize that. It wasn't because of his "horrible booking", as his booking wasn't horrible at all, it was because of a lack of wanting to work as a team from within the company.




And if you bash Russo for TNA's booking, you need to split that blame between him, Terry Taylor, Jeff Jarrett & Zeb Colter because Russo wasn't the lone wolf, he was part of a team. And in that regard, it can be argued that once Terry Taylor left and Jeff Jarrett lost power, the company improved. So, people need to really think about what they're saying before blindly bashing Russo. And I'm not endorsing him, I'm just saying he's not as bad as people make him out to be.







And fans were smart to the business, on a larger stage, as far back as 1997. Just watched Canadian Stampede and there's a fan walking back & forth with a sign that said "What's Kayfabe???". I didn't know what kayfabe meant until about 6 years later. And even before that, the ECW fans were largely in the know. They used to have Internet conventions for fans. So, Russo obviously saw the Internet rising and knew what the result would be. You can't leave those fans the way they are, as they'll spoil it for the rest. Instead, you "work" the smarks because a mark is going to mark regardless. And if Russo didn't do it, somebody else would have done it. Heyman knew what was up and kept 100 with the fans. Because if you didn't, the Internet was going to kill the business. You couldn't pretend it didn't exist, it was growing and would have had a negative effect on wrestling unless they grew with it and to his credit, Russo did.
A great post.
The reason why Russo "exposed" the business in WCW is simply because he "exposed" the business already in WWE and it worked, it was the most successful era.(I posted exposed in exclamation marks because it was the internet that killed it, Russo was just the first who recognized it)

One notable segment of exposing the business was a segment with DX and Vince McMahon in 1997 where DX played the MSG incident on the titantron with HBK, Triple H, Hall & Nash hugging. During that video DX mocked Vince and yelled "but Triple H and Diesel were the bad guys and HBK and Razor were the good guys and they are all friends"
If Russo wrote for WWE in the old fashioned kayfabe way and then tried something new in WCW I would understand the criticism but he did the same stuff in WWE during the Attitude Era. In other words it makes the critics hypocrites.

Although I think most critics doesn't even know what hypocrite means because they are too busy to jump on the Russo sucks bandwagon to check the meaning of the word.
The fact that most people think that he booked the Fingerpoke of Doom or Mae Young's birth says it all about these fans (I remember a WCW Russo era bash thread on this forum where people posted silly WCW segments booked by Russo that actually happened when Russo was in WWE:ti)

A great point in your post is
A leopard is not going to change it's spots. When you've achieved so much success producing a certain type of television and that's the reason you were hired in the first place, removed and brought back again, it's obvious your ideas aren't bad (you wouldn't have gotten the job in the first place)
People blame him for thinking his WWF style ideas would work in WCW and that he didn't understand that WCW had it's own style and it's own fanbase but who's fault is it really?
The fault is obviously at the people in WCW who sacrificed their style and loyal fanbase by hiring a WWE style writer, Russo only did what he was good at it.
Why should Russo care for the WCW style? His only focus was to beat WWE and to bring a #2 company on top again. People who should care already gave up on the loyal fanbase and their trademark style and wanted also to have an Attitude Era. That's why they brought in 2 Attitude Era writers instead of old school former WCW guys.
Blaming Russo is just as stupid as Barcelona hiring the former US coach Bob Bradley to compete with Real Madrid and when Barca finishes second they blame him that his style was too american




Obviously we all found out what happened when Russo had no filter to stop him from doing really stupid angles. Russo has some really great ideas, but he also has some really ridiculous ideas that overshadow the good ones. That is why he needs someone to veto his ideas, and why he worked so well in the WWF; Vince oversaw every angle, so he could veto the bad ideas. Not to say none slipped through (Beaver Cleavage?), but overall, Vince kept him on a leash.
Since you are the zillionth user who posts about McMahon being a filter and Russo having bad storylines in WCW because there was nobody who oversaw his ideas let me ask you a question (I'm sure you will ignore this because you don't have really an answer and you just repeat what was said zillion times, but I ask this nevertheless)
can you name one single storyline in WWE that was "less stupid" than a WCW 2000 storyline?
Pillman got a gun, Gang Wars, Sable, DX segments, the formation of the Corporate Ministry, Marlena miscarriage, Goldust becoming TAFKA Goldust, KAne-Undertaker-Bearer fights and reconciliations and all other stuff that happened during the WWE Russo era. Hell, even perhaps greatest AE storyline of all time Austin vs McMahon was full of segments that had Russo written all over it like the higher power, Bang 3:16, The Rock & Shane McMahon swerves at Survivor Series 1998, Stone Cold destroying McMahon's Corvette, Dude Love's challenge after WrestleMania XIV, it all had Russo written all over it

Since you all talk about filtering and McMahon please name me one, just one Attitude Era Russo storyline that looked more intellectual, classy and filtered compared to Vince Russo WCW & TNA storylines.
You can't so stop trolling
 
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