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Didn't see this posted yet.

This Sunday, just in time to whet your appetite for your upcoming Thanksgiving feast, WWE's annual Turkey Day Pay Per View tradition, Survivor Series, will go down. The card features the likes of Edge vs. Kane, Sheamus vs. John Morrison and quite possibly the end (?) of John Cena's contract with Nexus. Malicious Brit, Wade Barrett, the leader of the violent roguish upstart brigade Nexus, will face Randy Orton for the WWE Championship, with John Cena as the special guest referee. If Barrett wins the title, through whatever means, he'll let Cena walk away from Nexus. If Barrett loses, Cena gets fired from the WWE. But remember, win or lose, Barrett's been promised an ass-kicking from Cena.

It's a twisty-turny storyline for sure, but it's also one that's fascinated us with endless possibilities. Now that The Miz has thrown his name into the mix, and Nexus member David Otunga has started to rebel against Barrett, this match has become very hard to predict. IGN had a chance to speak with WWE's heel of the year, Wade Barrett, about his upcoming Survivor Series title match, his past as a bare-knuckle fighter, his finisher and the state of wrestling in the U.K.


IGN TV: Can you tell us a bit about your past as a bare-knuckle boxer? At what point in your life did you do that?

Wade Barrett: Yeah, that's something I started doing in my early 20's. I used to live in Liverpool and I knew some people who were involved in that world. They made me an offer to do some fighting for them. It was something that wasn't strictly legal. It was something that was under the cover of darkness, as it were. But it was something that I enjoyed at the time and I made some decent money out of it and it was something that I was quite successful at. So I enjoyed doing it.

IGN: Do you think that if The Big Show didn't have the knockout punch finisher that it's something they would have given to you?

Barrett: Well, I don't know so much about that. I think WWE likes more of a visual thing and when you see someone like The Big Show and have him throwing the punch, it looks more impressive than it would if it were done by someone like myself. Regardless of the impact, or regardless of how hard the punch actually is, I think when The Big Show does the punch it looks so much better, so I think he's the right guy for the job.

IGN: How did you decided on your finishing move? That Fireman's Carry Throwdown?

Barrett: That was something that was actually taught to me by a wrestler on the independent scene named Colt Cabana. He showed me that a few years ago and it was a move that I'd never seen used before. Apparently it gets used a bit in Mexican wrestling circles, but it wasn't one that I was familiar with. I liked it because it was different and it was a move that I could use on the vast majority of people in a lot of different circumstances and in a lot of different areas in the ring. I could pull the move off from almost anywhere. So it was a versatile move that I thought looked good.

IGN: What's it like to be in the Main Event on one of the original "Big Four" WWE Pay Per Views, especially considering that you haven't been on TV all that long?

Barrett: Well, that's definitely true. I'm still fairly new. For me to be Main Eventing one of the original "Big Four" Pay Per Views, as you said, is huge because, as a kid, these are were the Pay Per Views that I used to watch back when there were only four Pay Per Views. I was in the Main Event at SummerSlam a few months back, but that was a seven-on-seven match so there were a lot of other people sharing the spotlight there. But this time I'm going to be on my own against Randy Orton, with John Cena as the referee, and it's a huge moment for me and it really shows how much I've come in the last year, considering one year ago I was wrestling in developmental for FCW and I wasn't on TV or anything like that. And now, less than a year later, I'm Main Eventing one of the top Pay Per Views of the year. It's a big honor and I'm very proud of it.

IGN: Heel stables and feuds used to last for years and years. A lot of people thought Nexus would be dead and gone after SummerSlam. Are you surprised, since storylines move so much faster in the modern era, that the Nexus gig is still going on?

Barrett: Yes. I think with how fast and how often Pay Per Views come around nowadays and how quick storylines turn around and evolve - and you're right, things do move a lot faster now - but that being said I think it's a testament to the writing and the performances that we've managed to keep it fresh and keep ourselves relevant in the fans' minds so that people are still enjoying it and it's not something that's gotten old quickly. I think that's a testament to how hard people have work and how well we've been able to pull off the ideas that the creative geniuses have come up with. I think if it's good TV then it's going to keep on going and there's no reason to stop it. And hopefully it's going to keep on being on TV for a while longer yet.

IGN: Who were some of your wrestling idols growing up, and at what point did you start loving wrestling?

Barrett: Well, I was probably 10 years old when I started watching WWE and I was literally a huge fan from the word "go." I remember seeing my first piece of WWE programming and I was completely hooked and it was the number one thing in my life immediately. My hero, as a young child, was "The British Bulldog" Davey Boy Smith. He was definitely my favorite. He was the guy who I had the poster of on my wall and I looked p to. I loved the fact that he was the English guy in the WWE and he was the most muscular guy there. He was the strongest and I thought he had the best look and I was really proud of the fact that he was an Englishman.

Then as I got a little older I started to like Bret Hart. And Mr. Perfect. And I liked "Ravishing" Rick Rude. And then, as time went on, I obviously liked "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and The Rock and people like that as well. So it's something that, as I got older, my preferences and my tastes evolved a little. And then probably when I got to the age of about 20 I decided I wanted to be a wrestler. As a child I fantasized about it and imagined what it would be like Hulk Hogan and people like that. But when I got to 20 that's when I seriously started thinking that I could do it. And with my natural size and athletic ability and my confidence I knew I could do it so that's when I decided to make the motions to become a wrestler and think about how I could get to the WWE.

IGN: How is the indie scene in the U.K? Is it anything like the American indie scene?

Barrett: I haven't seen too much of the independent scene in America, so I can't really compare the two. But I can talk about the English independent scene and unfortunately it's nowhere near the wrestling heyday that British wrestling had in the 70's and perhaps the early 80's when British wrestling was huge and there were some really big stars that came out of there like Big Daddy and Mick McManus and people like that who were literally household names across the U.K. But nowadays it's very small time, there's not a lot of glamour. A lot of the show's you're lucky to get a hundred people in there. And the quality isn't so good over in the U.K. these days as well. Don't get me wrong, there some very good wrestlers out there, but there're also a lot of small time companies who just let anybody wrestle for them. Guys who have no business being in the ring. And unfortunately the public will go along and see a company like that who are putting on a really bad product for people and putting some really terrible wrestlers in there. So the U.K. seems to be just covered in a lot of bad wrestling at the moment, with just a few high peaks of good wrestling thrown in.
http://tv.ign.com/articles/113/1135510p1.html
http://tv.ign.com/articles/113/1135510p2.html

So Colt Cabana (Scotty Goldman) came up with Wasteland, huh? Interesting. Pretty good read.
 

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Celestial Messiah
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When I read it I imagined it was his voice doing so.

Anywho, wasteland was even before Cabana. I even remember seeing Daniels and Punk doing it once to set up one of their bigger moves. Daniels would hit the move then aim for one of his moonsaults.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When I read it I imagined it was his voice doing so.

Anywho, wasteland was even before Cabana. I even remember seeing Daniels and Punk doing it once to set up one of their bigger moves. Daniels would hit the move then aim for one of his moonsaults.
I know, what I meant to say is he came up with the idea for Barrett to use it as a finisher. Therefore Cabana must be the mastermind behind Nexus as well. It all makes sense now. Scotty Goldman is coming back with a vengeance.
 

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Thanks for posting, Tarf, cool read. Now waiting for the day Striker comments on the Wasteland being a "modified" version.
 

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There is no duty we so much underrate as... being
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Great read. It's refreshing to have a major angle be a major angle, one that will probably go an entire ten months from June 7, 2010 to April 3, 2011.

I read it in his voice, too. Even when he's not saying anything particularly evil, he still sounds wicked to me.
 

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Asuka
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IGN: How is the indie scene in the U.K? Is it anything like the American indie scene?
Barrett: I haven't seen too much of the independent scene in America, so I can't really compare the two. But I can talk about the English independent scene and unfortunately it's nowhere near the wrestling heyday that British wrestling had in the 70's and perhaps the early 80's when British wrestling was huge and there were some really big stars that came out of there like Big Daddy and Mick McManus and people like that who were literally household names across the U.K. But nowadays it's very small time, there's not a lot of glamour. A lot of the show's you're lucky to get a hundred people in there. And the quality isn't so good over in the U.K. these days as well. Don't get me wrong, there some very good wrestlers out there, but there's also a lot of small time companies who just let anybody wrestle for them. Guys who have no business being in the ring.
 

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DELIRIUM
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Pyro™;9060373 said:
And the quality isn't so good over in the U.K. these days as well. Don't get me wrong, there some very good wrestlers out there, but there's also a lot of small time companies who just let anybody wrestle for them. Guys who have no business being in the ring.

Probably the only time an Otunga picture has been acceptable.
 

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Barrett deserves respect.

I have to say the Wasteland does look a bit clunky at times, looks awkward in a way but it is unique.
 

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Asuka
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FX™;9060649 said:
Never thought Pyro would be joining the Tungamania phase...I'm disappointed. ;)
Joining them? Please. I'm doing the exact opposite of what they do, telling the truth about him instead of making a bunch of sarcastic comments about how Otunga should headline WrestleMania. :rolleyes:

Otunga is worthless garbage and the trolling about him isn't funny.
 

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Here's another interview he did. It's really interesting in relation to his pre-WWE life and he explains where his confidence on the mic has come from.

I conducted a phone interview Thursday with WWE star Wade Barrett, who will face WWE champion Randy Orton in the main event of the Survivor Series pay-per-view Sunday.

Less than a year ago you were wrestling in Florida Championship Wrestling. Now you’re main-eventing WWE pay-per-views with the likes of John Cena and Randy Orton. Can you describe what these past nine months or so have been like for you?

It has been obviously a very crazy few months. I think I debuted at the end of January or beginning of February this year on WWE. What most people don’t realize is that for pretty much the best part of a year prior to my debut, I’d actually been out injured in FCW. So I wasn’t even wrestling in FCW, I was out on the injured reserve list. I’d had a very big surgery where I tore my lat muscle off. So I really went from almost doing nothing – I was basically a commentator in FCW for most of that time on the TV show – to going on to WWE TV with just a very few matches sort of as a warm-up after I got back from my injury. So the last two years really, it’s been a huge step up for me. It’s been a great experience. I feel lucky every day that I’m up there at the moment and I’m obviously having a great time. The fact that things have gone so well – one year ago if someone had told me I’d be main-eventing Survivor Series this year with Randy Orton I would never have believed it. But it’s amazing that I’ve got here now and it’s a great feeling. I’m really looking forward to the show.



How have Cena and Orton – two of the biggest star in the business – been to work with?

They’re two very different people. I’d say Cena is probably a lot more approachable than Randy. He’s probably somebody I was able to connect with a lot sooner than I did with Randy. I think their on-air personas are very similar to what they’re like in real life in that respect. Randy’s a lot colder. But both guys have been great to work with. It’s been an incredible experience working with them and I’ve learned a lot just from working with them. They are two of the very best in the industry I wouldn’t say just now but of all time. For someone like me coming in with obviously my lack of experience at the top level, it’s been great to work with the best from the word go. Obviously the better the guy I’m working with the more I’m going to learn, so I’ve been very lucky in that respect.

Speaking of learning from guys, Chris Jericho was your on-screen pro on NXT. Was there any real mentoring going on with Jericho and you behind the scenes?

Yeah, definitely. I’d say to this day he’s probably my first point of contact if I’ve got any questions or stuff that I want to know about in the company or if I want critiques on anything that I’m doing. I’ve got a few people I would go to, including William Regal and Goldust as well – he’s been very helpful. But I’d say Chris Jericho is my No. 1 sort of influence and mentor to this day.

Have you or any of the other guys from NXT who are in The Nexus sensed any resentment in the locker room from guys who have been around for years and not received the super push that you’re getting?


Yeah, one hundred percent. I think we felt it a little more when we first came up for NXT. I think people saw that we were young guys, we’re in good shape and we’ve got a lot of potential. I think a lot of guys before they knew us were certainly worried about us being there, and probably some guys didn’t want us around. But I think over time with our attitudes and our hard work we’ve won a lot of people over. In general now it’s pretty harmonious in the locker room. There’s always going to be one or two guys who feel that they should be getting the push that you’re getting or should be getting the spot that you’ve got, but to be honest with you, they’re definitely in the minority. It’s something that WWE has pretty much stamped out in this day and age. I believe from reading books and hearing stories of the past the politicking and things like that were commonplace, but in general nowadays from what I understand it’s probably the most harmonious locker room it’s ever been.

When NXT first began, who do you view as your biggest threat as far as winning the competition?

I think from Day One I realized that Daniel Bryan was going to be a huge threat, purely based on the fact that I knew the pros were voting – it wasn’t a fan-based system or anything like that – and I knew that the pros all had a lot of respect for Daniel Bryan and what he had accomplished on the independent scene. So I think he had a bit of a head start on the majority of us because the pros had all heard of Daniel Bryan and seen his matches before and they respected him from that point of view. The rest of us were complete nobodies to the pros and as far as they were concerned we were just a bunch of green guys who were just showing up and hoping to do well. So I knew immediately because the pros had that affinity for Daniel Bryan that he was going to be the one that I would have to beat. I think the fact that he got eliminated from the show, from then on I had pretty much no doubt in my mind that I was going to win it.

You came up through the U.K. independent scene. What was it like to go back to Manchester recently as one of the top guys in WWE?

It was a very strange experience. I was half-expecting the crowd there to be cheering me, being the hometown guy, and I think I got an initial cheer and then that rapidly changed into boos, which I’m far more used to. It was cool going back there. I had my family come and watch me while we were on the tour. On the tour we covered towns like Birmingham, Cardiff, Nottingham, London, and I had various friends and family come and watch me. The last time most of them had come to watch me I was wrestling in front of maybe 200 people in small community centers and things like that with very low budget, low glamour, that sort of thing. So it’s been a huge difference to them. I think they all thought I was pretty crazy when I was wrestling on the independent scene, because I come from a good education background, I had a good career in recruitment going on, so to suddenly step down and being doing independent shows across the U.K, I think they thought I was crazy. But now it’s good to have them see me and see that the hard work and sacrifices all paid off and I’m at the top with WWE now.

You have history with Sheamus and Drew McIntyre. When the three of you were wrestling on the independents together, is making it in WWE something you all talked about? Secondly, would you like to work a program someday with those guys?


I met Sheamus and Drew I think it was in early 2006. We started doing a lot of shows together out in Ireland and across the U.K. The thing about the three of us was that I knew immediately that we were all standout guys, mainly based on our height. We were way bigger than any of the guys in the U.K. and we all looked good, we all worked out, which was quite rare for the U.K. at the time. Most of the independent wrestlers didn’t even lift weights or anything like that, so I knew that we looked like stars compared to everyone else. But I thought the problem at that time was the fact that with WWE there had never been that many foreign guys in the company at any one time. They always tended to have maybe one Englishman like a William Regal or going back further they just had The British Bulldog when I was a kid. So I thought it was going to be very difficult that all three of us would get signed. I thought maybe one of us might get signed and one of us may get a shot with WWE if we were lucky. I certainly never expected all three of us to get there. Sheamus, on the other hand, I remember him talking to us back in probably 2006 when we were still on the independent scene, he was very confident that one day all three of us were going to get there. So he predicted it.

In terms of working a program with those guys, I would love to. The problem is at the moment all three of us are guys that the crowd generally doesn’t like, so I don’t know how many people would want to see a Sheamus versus Wade Barrett match or a Wade Barrett against Drew McIntyre match being that the crowd is going to hate both guys in the match. But I could see one day certainly with Sheamus the fans really getting behind him. He’s got a very unique look and a good style as well. I think one day he’s definitely going to be a crowd favorite, and when that happens, I definitely look to lock horns with him and see where we can go.

You impressed people with your mic skills pretty much from the beginning since you’ve been on WWE television. Is that gift of gab something that just comes naturally for you or is it something that you’ve had to work at over the years?

I think that it’s definitely something that comes quite naturally to me, but it’s mainly due to my background. I’ve done a lot of work with recruitment, which involved me giving sales pitches and things like that and spending a lot of time on the phone selling my services to people. I think my skills on the mic come from that – just the fact that I basically had to pitch to some of the top directors at some of the biggest companies in the U.K. and try to win their business. I learned a speaking style from doing that for years – projecting confidence and being strongly spoken and being able to get my ideas across to a guy like a major director or a financial director of one of the biggest companies in England. You need to sound confident at all times, and I think the fact that I did that certainly helps my microphone style and my promo skills. And also I was the commentator with FCW like I said for a long time while I was out injured in 2009 – I think that helped as well. I was on the mic for three hours every week while we were filming our shows, and I was basically giving an on-the-fly promo for three hours in character. Aside from that, I’ve always had a good voice. I’m lucky that I have a deep, strong voice naturally, and the rest of it I just worked on as far as confidence and projecting myself.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given in the business and who gave it to you?


The very best piece of advice I’ve been given I probably can’t tell you because it’s not PG-rated [laughs]. But I suppose Chris Jericho has definitely given me a good piece of advice in that when I started in NXT he told me that I couldn’t just be strong in one area of what I do. I couldn’t just be good on the mic. I needed to be good on the mic; I needed to be good in the ring; I need to be good in my presentation; my ring attire need to look good, my appearance. Everything about me needed to be the best. I couldn’t be weak in any area because you’re only as good as your weakest aspect. So that’s something that I’ve been very conscious of and I know where my weak points are and what I’ve got to work on – and I also know what my strengths are. So that’s probably the best piece of advice that I’ve been given.
http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/sports/wrestling/blog/2010/11/qa_with_wade_barrett.html
 

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I like everything that goes on with this guy. Hopefully he doesn't get pushed to the back when HHH comes back and runs over the entire Raw roster.
 
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