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I guess it was way too good and brought the site's average content quality up too far.
 

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You spent too much time looking at my avatar and s
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Can somebody paste this in a word/txt doc and upload to a site like mediafire? The cached version isn't available.

Edit, got it. Spam alert!

Randy, Ratings and Stock: The WWE's 20 Biggest Problems
By
John Cobbcorn
(Analyst) on May 31, 2012

3,896 reads

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As far as "Worst Week Evers" go, for the WWE, this week has been horrendous. Certainly, it's not the absolute worst week; for that, we'd probably have to go back to when Chris Benoit became the worst monster in the history of the sport.

Or perhaps further back to when WCW first overtook the WWE in the ratings.

Perhaps even further back to when Vince McMahon found himself embroiled in a steroid trial.

Certainly, there have been some worse weeks for the WWE, but this one has to rank in the top 10.

Unlike the other weeks, however, this particularly bad week, may be the most foreboding.

All in a matter of days, it has been announced that the WWE's flagship show, Raw, has brought in the worst ratings in almost a year, at 2.7 (per PWTorch.com).

In addition to this, the WWE's stock value has declined to a near 52 week low, finishing the day at $7.85 a share.

That stock is only going to drop further because WWE.com announced their poster boy for Smackdown, Randy Orton, has gotten himself suspended a third time for his second (third, really) violation of the Wellness Policy, putting the repeat offender precariously close to the WWE having to fire him.

(Good times. Good times.)

But, why, even over Benoit kicking dirt in the face of the entire industry, even over the WWE teetering on the brink of destruction at the hands of Eric Bischoff and the NWOverplayed, even over the Federal Government looking to put Vince McMahon in the slammer, is this week the most foreboding?

Well, I'm glad you asked...
The Enemy Within
Pictured: Randy and Steph arguing over who's the bigger screw up.
Pictured: Randy and Steph arguing over who's the bigger screw up.

The primary difference between this slew of bad news, and previous issues the WWE faced and overcame, is that this is not an external problem, but an internally created issue.

This is not a wrestler losing his mind and performing a double murder-suicide.

This is not a rival promotion turning your leftover wrestlers into the stable to end all stables.

This is not ambitious politicians looking to score political points at your expense.

This is the result of a deeply flawed internal system that has made decisions that have corrupted the company in such a manner that weeks like this become possible.

This is the result of incompetence.

The difference between this and the previous problems, is the difference between someone trying to beat you up and a doctor telling you you have cancer in your brain, lungs and liver.

You can fight back and outmaneuver outside threats. You can punch, kick and claw your way to survival, like the WWE has done in the past.

But what do you do when your own internal organs are what's killing you?

What do you do when the problems you find yourself facing, the slow death of your company, are a result of your own daughter and her "creative" team?

What do you do when the reason you can't convince investors that you're a long-term safe bet is because you've created a business model that relies on only two to three men to drive sales and one of them just got a second strike?

What do you do, when it's your own insistence on utilizing a PG-rated program, in an increasingly edgy world, that drives away fans to the point where you, yourself, have caused your ratings to fall to times back when WCW was dominating you?

Well, for the WWE, the answer is the same for the man who's turned ashen white with the news he only has a year to live: operate.

The WWE has to realistically look in the mirror and analyze the problems that have driven it from prominence to a by-thought that only gets attention when The Rock shows up.

Then, it has to proceed to cut out those problems like a doctor cutting out the cancer of a dying patient.

So, what are those problems?
4 to 1 Odds
Pictured: Proof that one star can't B.A.Star without another star.
Pictured: Proof that one star can't B.A.Star without another star.

Not to sound like a broken record, but I have said this before and I will say it again: One of the primary reasons the WWE has lost prominence is because they have gone from a system that promoted multiple wrestlers at the top to a system that only has a singular alpha-male: John Cena.

While everyone calls it the "Era of Hulkamania," and Hulk was the biggest star, Hulk Hogan was not the only Alpha-male in the company.

There was Andre The Giant, Macho Man Randy Savage, Rowdy Roddy Piper and, later on, The Undertaker and The Ultimate Warrior. They were all megastars.

Again, look at the most successful era as far as viewership is concerned: the Attitude Era. There was a binary system in place, where two men had claim to the Alpha-male spot: The Rock and Stone Cold Steve Austin.

Around them during their runs were men like the Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle, Brock Lesnar, Chris Jericho, Chris Benoit, Bret Hart, Shawn Michaels, Mick Foley and more.

There was a bevy of top-tier talent that, at anytime, could be given the strap and made the top guy for a while.

Even Chris Jericho, who would fall on the smaller scale of those bright stars, was allowed to beat The Rock and Stone Cold on the same night to become the first ever Undisputed Heavyweight Champion of the WWF.

But, if you look at today's roster, it's John Cena, Randy Orton, CM Punk and...and...Sheamus?

To look at this problematic issue, let's focus on CM Punk, as he most starkly represents the problem with the WWE today and why they are at a crossroads now.

CM Punk, last summer, was told to grab a microphone and say whatever he wanted to say.

He then blew up the WWE.

Rightfully, the WWE was smart and capitalized on this briefly, let him feud with Cena and have a couple flawless verbal jousts and then have the match of the year at Money In The Bank.

Well done.

But then, inexplicably, they decide to end that searing-hot feud, not let Punk overcome Cena completely and take his spot as the second alpha-dog next to Cena. Instead, they throw him into some boring, convoluted nonsense.

They interject Nash and have him cost Punk his title to (not in anyway exciting) Alberto Del Rio, then fail to even have Punk get his revenge on Nash, as they didn't even bother to check if Nash could wrestle or not before interjecting him in the feud. (Incompetence.)

Then Nash turns into Triple H, and Triple H, the part-time working, near-retirement, already-got-his, Triple H, beats CM Punk, instead of putting him over.

Then, Triple H turns into John Laurinaitis, and we have mannequins and Dynamic Dude references, and the cutting-edge superstar that rocked the world was dead.

Today, CM Punk is just another WWE champion that appears in the middle of the show while Big Slow, Johnny Ace and JAHHN CEEENA!!, bore people in the main event.

That's how the WWE books things.

How the WWF would have booked it? CM Punk goes over Cena clean, not just at MITB, but in the rematch. Then, he runs through Kevin Nash, who would've come after checking if he was medically cleared to wrestle. Then he goes through ADR, and then he goes through Triple H.

In the midst of this, he's still dropping pipe-bombs, the WWE is bringing back his friends like Colt Cabana and Luke Gallows and putting other indie faces around him and they begin to give fans a revolution of sorts.

And while this doesn't change the core makeup of the WWE, it becomes an alternative for fans who don't like John Cena.

Alternative.

Second option.

Different flavor.

I emphasize that because it is the core reason why the Attitude Era was so successful and the PG Era is so boring.

Do you realize, that not everybody came to see Stone Cold Steve Austin? Some people came to see the Rock. And some people didn't like the Rock; they came to see Stone Cold Steve Austin. Some people came for the Undertaker. Others came for Triple H and Shawn Michaels.

I personally was never all that high on Austin. He was OK, had some great moments; I was entertained by him. But, I wasn't paying to see him. I was paying to see The Rock, Kurt Angle and Chris Jericho. Those were my guys.

I hated Hulk Hogan as a face in the WWF and as a heel in the WCW. I never could stand him, even as a kid. I hated his promos and he couldn't wrestle. I came for Macho Man Randy Savage; I spent my money for Scott Hall.

The thing is, there was Va-ri-e-ty.

If you want to follow a truly top star in the WWE today? You either get John Cena, or Irish-flavored John Cena, with a splash of Viper or Punk.

The WWE no longer presents the variety at the top of the card that they used to.

And the lack of options causes fans to get bored.

But there is a very scary proposition about all of this...
It May Already Be Too Late to Fix It
Is it "Going, going, gone"? Or, "One's going and the other's gone"?
Is it "Going, going, gone"? Or, "One's going and the other's gone"?

The WWE spent the last eight years pushing John Cena as the alpha-male of the WWE. All of their energy went into him, which is why he's a 12-time World Champion at 35 years old.

(In comparison, Ric Flair won the last of his 16 titles when he was 57. Cena has another 22 years to get four more titles to match Flair. He's only been on the main stage for 10 years.)

The other two the WWE pushed to the moon as alternatives were the sinister Randy Orton and the brutal yet suave Dave Bautista.

When they lost Dave, who foresaw the direction of the WWE, said he wanted no part of it and split, that forced Randy Orton to play a role he was never built to play: face. If you performed a poll, the overwhelming majority of fans would prefer heel Orton to face Orton.

The WWE tried to turn Randy Orton into John Cena 2.0, make him the face of Smackdown (currently doing 1.8's in the ratings, a far cry from the 4.0's of not that long ago) and make him the B-show's alpha-male.

It was a fool's errand because all it did was make people consider Orton the "SuperOrton" to Cena's "SuperCena" and failed to move the ratings needle.

But these problems only reflected the symptoms of a cancer that had already long since taken root. The coughing up of blood that let the interested observer recognize that something is critically wrong with the patient.

The truth is, that was because the WWE took the flawed policy of "We'll decide who is a star" and chose those few men, as opposed to "the fans choose who the stars are" that so many pushes and superstars were aborted in the last decade as a result, that now, there's hardly anyone left to elevate a new star to the main-event, even if they wanted to.

CM Punk was an aberration. It was a moment that wasn't supposed to happen. There is a reason why Punk and the WWE keep using words like "I wasn't supposed to be here," "I'm not the mold the WWE prefers as a top guy."

It's because it's true.

The WWE no more expected for that Work-Shoot to take off like it did than they expected Daniel Bryan's "Yes!" to take off after the 18-second loss at WrestleMania. (More on that in a moment.)

Like many of the WWE's greatest stars, that wasn't planned at all. It was the long forgotten moment when the fans chose the stars and the WWE sensed it and elevated them to usually legendary status.

You weren't supposed to like The Rock, you know. He was supposed to irritate you as a self-centered, racist. You weren't supposed to like Stone Cold. You were supposed to think Bret Hart was the man for sharpshooting him into unconsciousness.

But you chose those men, those moments. The WWF followed your lead, and icons were born.

But the WWE is not the WWF. The WWE is the cancer-riddled shell of the WWF.

So, when you support Daniel Bryan, who worked himself into one of the finest heels on both brands?

They crush it in 18 seconds.

And when that creates yet another unexpected moment and the fans start exploding for Daniel Bryan, what happens?

Let's analyze:

The WWF? They would've immediately had him take the title back from Sheamus. They would've kept AJ Lee with him, recognizing she was a great heat getting tool for Bryan to use and then set him against and put him over John Cena and Randy Orton.

When they recognized Austin, Angle, Mankind, DX, etc., were hot commodities, they didn't hesitate to push them right to the top and right over anybody in the way. The same would've happened for Bryan.

But the WWE?

They proceed to feed him to Sheamus, their guy, again and again and again, until "Yes!" becomes "No!" Instead, they break him away from his heat-getting tool, AJ Lee. Instead, they let every wrestler on the roster piggy back on his "Yes!" chants, and he hasn't beaten a top guy cleanly since the triple-threat cage match between himself, Big Show and Mark Henry.

(Seriously, could you imagine the WWF being stupid enough to let half the roster start using The Rock's catchphrases and make them less special or uniquely his?)

However, these kinds of decisions have gone on for years and hurt many. The list of men that got hot over the years, but the WWE botched, runs long.

John Morrison, The Nexus, The Awesome Truth, Shelton Benjamin, Christian, Daniel Bryan, Kaval, Cryme Tyme, even the chance to rebirth the original ECW and the failure of the Alliance.

When The Nexus should win? No, John Cena should rise victorious. Even though it kills the angle.

When Shelton is stealing the show every night? Every night. And he's got the fans in the palm of his hands after Triple H agreed to job to him and now he's known as "Mr. Benjamin," should we give him a manager for a mouthpiece and take it all the way?

No. We should de-push him and release him, citing a low work ethic.

Work ethic? WORK Ethic? The guy outworked everybody in the company that didn't have the name Kurt, Chris or Shawn.

The WWF gives the man a manager for a mouthpiece, launches him to the top and sends him to acting school and/or promo classes. The WWE cuts him for the most patently stupid reason ever given. It's like cutting CM Punk because "he's not good on the mic."

I could go on forever about all of the missed opportunities the WWE failed to capitalize on in favor of promoting their guys over guys the fans wanted.

But the end result is what you have before you today.

A main-event scene so depleted of real star power, that even if the WWE said: "OK, we're going to separate Dolph Ziggler from Vickie and Swagger, and make him the next icon." They couldn't do it.

Not only do they no longer know how to make an icon, but they just don't have enough top talent to make it work. They let Dolph beat CM Punk three times in a row. And he's still jobbing out in a half-dead Tag division against thrown together teams.

They could let Dolph defeat Cena, Orton and Sheamus for the World Title. It wouldn't move the ratings one iota anymore than CM Punk getting his title back from Alberto Del Rio did.

The problem is too severe. You see, the WWE fooled around and lost about half of its main event from 2002 and beyond. Rock to Hollywood. Austin and Goldberg to retirement. Brock to MMA. Angle, RVD and Hardy to TNA. Eddie and Benoit to the grave.

And when they should have immediately turned to guys like Ken Kennedy, MVP, Shelton Benjamin, Mark Henry, Christian and Carlito in addition to John Cena, Randy Orton and Batista, and had them running roughshod over the main-eventers who were left and defeating each other equally to establish a new main-event scene with variety, they didn't.

The exodus of top level talent from 2002-2007 should have resulted in an influx of new top talent to send them on their way with losses to get themselves over, and then take their spot while millions more people were still watching.

Instead, that window of time was used for John Cena, Randy Orton and Dave Bautista from the newer crop and finally used to give Edge his just due.

Only four men were selected to be "The Man."

And do you know what the problem is when you start pre-choosing your own men? And then you choose so few of them?

They get neck injuries and retire early.

They don't like the direction the company is going in and quit.

They prove they are unstable drug-users who are on the brink of termination.

And it leaves you with only one true main-eventer who got the rub from battling guys like The Undertaker, Triple H, Kurt Angle, JBL, Brock Lesnar and Eddie Guerrero, when they were still around as full-time performers.

Only John Cena.

And all other efforts to promote your guys now that it's too late? Guys like Alberto Del Rio, Lord Tensai, and Sheamus?

Prove fruitless.

"But, doctor, is there any hope?"
It's Going to Get a Whole Lot Worse Before It Gets Better
Pictured: The WWE's heartbeat on the Electrocardiogram.
Pictured: The WWE's heartbeat on the Electrocardiogram.

There's a sliver of hope.

Call it a radical, last-ditch therapy that they outlawed in 29 other countries for it's radical last-ditchiness.

A complete makeover.

The reality is, one way or another, the WWE is going to die.

And it will either "die as we know it" or it will "die altogether".

Let me tell you some factoids about my younger days that will at first seem meaningless:

When I was a younger man, I spent a significant amount of my life in a town called Stockton, California. When I used to live in Stockton, I used to work at a bank called Washington Mutual.

I used to shop at a book store called Borders, rent movies from Hollywood Video, buy electronics from Circuit City and buy games from KB Toy Stores. One of my favorite franchises was Mortal Kombat (Scorpion and Sub-Zero? Those were my dudes.). I used to love watching WCW wrestling, too.

The trained business eye will already see the connection to these small tidbits about a young Mr. Cobbcorn from 10 or so years ago.

The common link?

They are all gone. Borders, Hollywood Video, Circuit City, KB Toy Stores, Midway Games (makers of Mortal Kombat), WCW. All of them went under. Even the city of Stockton is about to become the largest city in the history of the United States to go bankrupt.

Another common link? At some point in history, every single one of those companies was bigger than the WWE is now.

The only thing too big to fail is a bank with political connections to Washington.

So, when I say the WWE can and will die if it keeps going in the direction it is, I have a unique perspective on it: I've seen bigger, badder corporations than them get swallowed up.

Ask a fan in 1998 if it was possible for WCW to go out of business...

That being said, the WWE will either "die" or "die as we know it."

The current course is unsustainable and has set the WWE on the path to a slow death. Without course corrections, that is the inevitable end, and anyone who has followed this company since Vince McMahon, Jr. turned it into a national juggernaut, can see the writing on the wall.

This is why the stock keeps dropping and will continue to drop.

I have said this in a previous article (about eight months ago when the stock was in the $9.00 a share range, before dropping to the $7.00 range), the incompetence in the WWE is costing the WWE money, and it was going to get worse.

Their policies and executives are driving away investors. And you have to understand exactly why it's such a damning indication against the WWE, even though to the unlearned of the ways of the stock market, it only seems like a few bucks.

First, understand that no matter how much you think you know about the WWE, stock analysts and traders probably know more.

A fan gets paid nothing to know about the WWE. But these men and women make millions off of knowing a company down to who they hire to clean the toilets at the corporate headquarters and reflecting that back to people who give them their money to invest.

They analyze every move the WWE makes and are privy to knowledge that the ordinary fan doesn't have or even care about having. They weigh the pros and cons of where they believe the company is headed based upon a prism of information given to them directly from the top executives of the company.

And with a year-to-date performance of -14.59 percent and absolutely abysmal numbers over the past five months (and even prior), the professionals who know how to analyze the direction of a company are telling their clients: "This is a dead dog. Get out now. They have no future."

So, while smarks like us argue about how the Hatfield and McCoys had a big opening night and Boston was playing Miami in the NBA Eastern Conference Finals, which impacted the ratings, the analysts are saying: "There was a time where the WWE would've impacted their ratings, not the other way around. Sell."

About that -14.59 percent drop from a year-to-date standpoint.

How much money has that cost the WWE in the past five months, with 74,484,254 shares on the market, each one losing about $1.75 in the drop from around $9.60 at the top of the year down to $7.85 today?

$130,347,444.50

In other terms? A little over one-third of their $378,620,000 in total assets reported at the end of 2011. That includes all ticket sales, merchandising, PPV buys and stock.

If all this number mumbo-jumbo bores you, then pay no heed to any of this except the following sentence:

The WWE has lost one-third of their complete value in only five months.

The numbers behind those links are a little complex, but the gist of it is, "WWE is screwed."

Especially when one considers the value of that stock was as high as $14 dollars only a few years ago during the Great Recession.

If the WWE weren't a family-owned business, heads would've rolled a long time ago.

But it's to the point now where heads will have to roll soon. Even if it's filicide.

Speaking of filicide, and now that I've shown you the severity of this internal disease, I believe I was speaking about a radical, last-ditch treatment...
Get Dead or Die Trying
I'm not a doctor, but I play one on the Internet.
I'm not a doctor, but I play one on the Internet.

Readers of my previous articles know that I have long since called for the sacking of Stephanie McMahon and the "creative" Team of the WWE. (Filicide is the act of killing one's own daughter or son, in case you didn't know.)

But, I currently believe that for the WWE to survive and reverse its downward trend, it's going to have to commit suicide, in essence.

It's going to have to blow itself up.

And every policy, every executive, every trend and every habit is going to have to be analyzed and excised like a tumor from the brain or re-analyzed and improved for maximum effectiveness.

Every policy and every procedure that has caused the WWE to fall from its lofty heights to 2.9 ratings, -14.59 stock performances and allowing a proven liability like Randy Orton to be so integral to the product, that his absence deeply wounds it, instead having a crop of true main-eventers at his level to cover the loss without sweating a drop.

Let me be as clear as possible when I say every policy and attitude that has corrupted this organization like tumors in its body...
Problem No. 1
A World Champion should never be beaten in 18 seconds again.
A World Champion should never be beaten in 18 seconds again.

The idea that only the WWE knows what makes a superstar and denying or stifling the fans wishes to see a star they prefer actually be treated as a dominant main-event force.

That must go.
Problem No. 2
Yeah, this one was just a little big and we choked on him.
Yeah, this one was just a little big and we choked on him.

The forcing down the throat of the fans, wrestlers who they are not interested in or support, but you continue to push them because you think they should be successful and we should care.

That must go.
Problem No. 3
You know, I used him, but historically, I should've used Austin.
You know, I used him, but historically, I should've used Austin.

The ability of certain wrestlers to politic and decide whether they want to work with a wrestler or job to him instead of being employees that do what they are told, when they are told, for the good of the company.

That must go.
Problem No. 4
Yes...CERTAIN...individuals...
Yes...CERTAIN...individuals...

Nepotism and favoritism that keeps certain unqualified individuals in their positions to the detriment of the company. Agents, bookers and writers who can't help to put together better shows, matches or stories, but still retain their positions in spite of the clear mediocrity of the programming.

That must go.
Problem No. 5
Never forget.
Never forget.

Storylines that are cleared for television without any clear thought given to them, no thought given to their end and handled with no precise execution once making it on the air.

That must go.
No, Seriously...
Heath Forgot. He thinks Skip's name is Ryback.
Heath Forgot. He thinks Skip's name is Ryback.

Horribly thought out storylines must go.

Seriously.
Problem No. 6
Three? Yeah, we're gonna need just about 10 more to really care.
Three? Yeah, we're gonna need just about 10 more to really care.

The idea that only a few select, company-chosen men can stand at the top of the company, as opposed to a plethora of top talents that can be elevated to the top based on talent and skill.

That must go.
Problem No. 7
Was robbing the fans money for this main event worth the hit to your reputation? Was it?
Was robbing the fans money for this main event worth the hit to your reputation? Was it?

Tons of unnecessary PPV's that come back-to-back, one after the other, with very little story or no story at all behind them.

Putting out lower-quality PPV's, riddled with matches that aren't even advertised, let alone given any build up.

PPV's that are not handled much better than a glorified Raw just to squeeze more money out of the fanbase.

That must go.
Problem No. 8
He'd actually be a big star if you started counting his win streak. Goldberg II. Embrace it.
He'd actually be a big star if you started counting his win streak. Goldberg II. Embrace it.

Debuting new characters without any deep thought process or backstory for fans to delve into or connect with.

Fostering an environment where five separate wrestlers (Ryback, Brodus Clay, Lord Tensai, Damien Sandow and Antonio Cesaro) are performing squash matches on the product because no further thought has been put into getting them over other than letting them win matches, thus causing people to care little for the new shallow characters.

That must go.
Problem No. 9
If I'm Vince McMahon? I would be too busy to care about who Melina is having sex with..
If I'm Vince McMahon? I would be too busy to care about who Melina is having sex with..

Creating a backstage environment that is so unprofessional that top executives actually know and care about who is having sex with who and actually determining who should be pushed or punished based upon that, as opposed to pushing those who the fans like more.

Getting involved in silly, "Who has heat with who?" and "Who is friends with who?" business and making television decisions based upon that instead of sound business decisions.

That must go.
Problem No. 10
I pretty much mean Austin Aries and Low-Ki. Zema just hopped in the shot.
I pretty much mean Austin Aries and Low-Ki. Zema just hopped in the shot.

Choosing which wrestlers to give opportunities to based upon preconceived notions on things like "size" and "height" and "who played linebacker at OSU," as opposed to raw, undeniable talent.

That must go.
Problem No. 11
"Why are we fighting, again?", "Uh, because our ring-music played?"
"Why are we fighting, again?", "Uh, because our ring-music played?"

Boring and predictable matches that parade out wrestler after wrestler where no one has any reason to fight and there are no stories between the participants. Not even anything as simple as a stable war or a long-running rivalry; just match after match of mid-carders who fight for silly reasons or no reason at all.

No stories for most talents who appear on TV?

That must go.
Problem No. 12
Pictured: Smug. Definition thereof.
Pictured: Smug. Definition thereof.

A WWE that openly ignores its fans and is so smug to even tell them they need not give any submissions on storyline or character ideas directly on their website, when, for the most part, they have none.

A WWE that despite fans ardent wishes in arenas and on the Internet decides they know what's best for the fans, regardless of if they hemorrhage viewership, stock value and net worth.

That must go.
Problem No. 13
I don't know why I haven't gotten around to watching this yet...
I don't know why I haven't gotten around to watching this yet...

A company that dips its pen into so many other inks and fails at every single one of them that they neglect the primary product that allows them to blow that kind of money on straight-to-DVD films and doomed-to-fail football leagues: the in-ring product.

That must go.
Problem No. 14
I love you, I love you not. Sometimes I'm cold, sometimes I'm hot.
I love you, I love you not. Sometimes I'm cold, sometimes I'm hot.

The idea that a wrestler's career can be treated like a yo-yo and it won't have any long-term effects on their viability or ability to register with a broad spectrum of viewership.

The idea that one can go from main-eventing WrestleMania and then be jobbed out for months. Or, dominate a division for a year and then suddenly go on a senseless losing streak, and that it doesn't hurt the ability of that wrestler to get over in the future, or cheapen the product.

The idea that the personal feelings and whims of executives can trump common sense booking and the integrity of the product.

That must go.
Problem No. 15
Pictured: Useless. Definition thereof.
Pictured: Useless. Definition thereof.

Lazy and untalented individuals that still get to take up time on television, even though their appearance is a drain on the ratings and someone with more talent could use the time to get over and actually help to draw more fans.

That must go.
Problem No. 16
Pictured: Eight better wrestlers than 90 percent of the current WWE roster. The main one.
Pictured: Eight better wrestlers than 90 percent of the current WWE roster. The main one.

The philosophy that the independent scene is the "minor leagues" as opposed to a breeding ground for talents, many times, far greater than those that came from OVW or FCW. Talent that have cut their teeth around the world against the greatest wrestlers available.

The philosophy that they are lower than the rookie bodybuilders they can wrestle and talk circles around but are left to stagnate in developmental being treating like "minor-leaguers" when they come to the WWE for an opportunity.

That must go.
Problem No. 17
If you waited a few more years, we'd probably think they were great talents.
If you waited a few more years, we'd probably think they were great talents.

Stuffing your main roster with talents that are not ready for the big dance from FCW. Thus, quickly wrecking the development of promising young talents while simultaneously compromising the quality of your television and Internet programs.

That must go.
Problem No. 18
Pictured: A Certain ex-employee talking about conservative values with The Rattlesnake.
Pictured: A Certain ex-employee talking about conservative values with The Rattlesnake.

A product that is so scared to shock, confront, or even slightly offend anyone, for fear it may jeopardize a certain ex-employee's chances at her delusional dream of winning a Senate seat (That she will never win. Ever.) that it never pushes the envelope, creates controversy or produces cutting-edge entertainment. Thus, no one ever talks about the product in mainstream media, so hardly anyone ever notices what they are doing beyond the dwindling fanbase that is still sticking around.

That, almost more than anything else, must go.
Problem No. 19
Yeah...Smackdown clips...I got nothing clever for this one.
Yeah...Smackdown clips...I got nothing clever for this one.

Any WWE employee, from the superstars to the executives, to the road agents to the creative writers, who are unwilling or unable to perform at the highest levels and produce the highest quality television and do whatever it takes to turn the direction of the WWE around.

They must go.
The Deadliest Problem: Problem No. 20
I never thought I'd see the day I would call for Vince's retirement.
I never thought I'd see the day I would call for Vince's retirement.

The executive that has lost his touch and no longer knows what the pulse of the masses feels like.

The man who is so egotistical that, regardless of the loss of literally four million viewers in under a decade, the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stock since the WWE went public and the complete degradation of the mainstream relevance of the company, he would still insist it is his way or no way at all.

The man who allowed things to go this far and allowed the quality of star power to fall from the likes of Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage, Shawn Michaels and Bret Hart, Stone Cold and The Rock, all the way down to Alberto Del Rio and Lord Tensai.

The man who will let nepotism get in the way of letting the right people do the job (Heyman should be head of Creative, not Stephanie. It's as simple as that.) and no longer has that magic touch that gave birth to this empire in the first place.

The man who was the Al Davis of the WWF.

But unfortunately, is also the Al Davis of the WWE.

Sadly, the most inoperable and irremovable tumor of them all. The one closest to the heart.

He must go.

And that, more than likely, will not happen. And perhaps that is why this cancer is so deadly.

Because with a man like Vincent Kennedy McMahon, Jr., a man who forged this entire industry according to his vision, a man who is more responsible for the glory days of Hulkamania and the Attitude Era than even Hulk Hogan and Steve Austin, themselves, will never admit that he's lost his touch.

The great ones never really do go quietly into the night. They just need one more thing to work, just one more idea to go the way they see it.

It doesn't matter if it's Brett Favre killing his legacy in Minnesota, Shaquille O'Neal clamoring for one more ring in Boston, Ric Flair embarrassing himself in TNA or Vince McMahon allowing and/or driving failed idea after failed idea behind the scenes in the WWE.

The true Hall of Fame players never leave the game; the game leaves them behind...

And it's always sad to watch.
The Final Diagnosis
Pictured: The WWE's stock in five years.
Pictured: The WWE's stock in five years.

Truthfully, the WWE has advanced stage four cancer as far as a business is concerned.

Various parts of the company, from the executive branch to creative arm to the backstage area, to the televised product, have deep flaws that have been reflected throughout the past decade in severe loss of fans, finances and acclaim.

Nevertheless, in some cases, stage four cancer is not a death sentence. If the patient is willing to undergo dramatic procedures and allow painful and invasive surgeries to be done, there is a chance at survival. (Wait, why am I talking like an actual doctor, here?)

In all seriousness, the WWE has a tremendous amount of problems, and the bottom line is that they are going to have to go through an entire overhaul of the product on both sides of the camera in order to change the trajectory of the company.

Losing a third of your worth in only five months should resonate with everyone just how bad the WWE is doing despite the bluster, smoke and mirrors.

Imagine if you made $12.00 an hour and on your performance review, your boss said your performance was so bad that they've decided to cut your wage down to $8.00 an hour.

Most of us would be checking Careerbuilder for another job because not only would it get insanely tight with the bills, but the writing would be on the wall that our livelihood is in jeopardy.

Now, much like a patient with cancer, it's really not over for the WWE. They won't die tomorrow and they still have some years left. And really, they could change things around rather quickly if they just got rid of the nonsense that occurs behind the scenes, in their approach to the fans, talents and in their creative capacity.

Pretty much everything.

The WWE knows this, too. But their approach to it is clumsy. Throwing new characters at the problem with no thought. Spending loads of money on guys like Brock and then barely having him on TV afterwards. Going to three hours to increase ad revenue, when they don't have a quality product at two hours. It's why Vince is making excuses in shareholder meetings.

The WWE knows they're in trouble. They have for awhile now. It's why Daniel Bryan ever held the gold in the first place and why Zack Ryder was a former U.S. Champ. It's what we screamed for. But, they just don't have the mental acumen in "creative" to execute those changes properly, so they think they know better and go right back to business as usual.

They aren't stupid as a corporation overall. But the problem is, they are stubborn.

And if you look back on Punk's work-shooting, this is what he was talking about. He wasn't completely joking when he said the WWE would be better off when Vince died. He wasn't joking at all when he said Vince doesn't know what makes a superstar, anymore. He probably wasn't joking when he said HHH and Steph were stupid.

It's stubborn pride and arrogance on the part of Vince, Stephanie and Triple H.

Do you think Vince wants to look at Austin Aries and say: "Man, we really missed on him."

Do you think he wants to admit that when compared to previous creative heads like Paul Heyman, Ed Ferrara, Vince Russo and even himself, that Stephanie is a complete and abject failure and he was wrong for putting her in the position?

Do you think Triple H wants to look in the mirror and say, "My big acquisitions were a botch machine who rubs the locker room the wrong way and got hurt during his big push, a woman who went and got pregnant before we could even push her to the moon and a fat mid-carder repacked as a fake Japanese guy who can't get over even after feeding him our two biggest stars.I really suck at this."

Of course not.

It's just human nature to keep running in the direction you're going, even if you're badly screwing up, because it's easier than admitting to millions of people: "I was wrong."

There's even more temptation to never admit that you're wrong, because even though you've lost four million viewers, you still have over three million left. Even though you've lost over 130 million dollars since the beginning of the year in stock, you still have over 200 million dollars left and will make more.

It's hard to see the big picture when you've still got that much reason to be prideful. The A-type personality thinks: "I've got 200 million; who cares if I lost 130 million? I can get it back. I know what I'm doing."

It never occurs to you that if you lose as much in the next 10 years as you've lost in the last 10 years, you'll cease to exist.

Eric Bischoff thought he was a genius in WCW until the day he was shown the door and he watched later as Vince and Shane showed up on his flagship concept: Nitro.

Hulk Hogan still thinks he's a draw, even though he's a shell of himself in a runt promotion like TNA.

That's just how A-types operate.

They never see that they've failed. They've run out of ideas. They've held on too long and need to pass the torch to new, smarter people. They never want to say "I'm sorry; I was wrong."

But the future of the WWE depends on Vince, Stephanie and Paul having the collective courage to say: "We were wrong."

"We were wrong about snubbing fans, treating the indie scene guys like they were beneath us, not forcing stars like Austin and Taker to pass the torch to the new generation, letting backstage politics direct this company, picking guys we liked for promotion over guys who were better, and putting the welfare and quality of the product on the back-burner for our wife/mom's senate run."

And then make the changes necessary to stop the bleeding.

But see, for A-type personalities who build international corporations and win the WWE Title 403 times, swallowing your pride is sometimes harder than beating cancer.

That's why they say pride comes before a fall.

And sometimes, death comes after.
 

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What a load of Shit they removed it ? It was fantastic!!!!

I personally dont think the E will ever go out like he mentioned in comparison to other bigger companies. Because the other companies had competition.

Tna in no way or form are a threat, ''KOKEPEPSI'' Is right on the points were the E can buy their stock back and ratings mean jack shit.

I agree however on the article that the company is being completely boring to some fans, yet they can generate new fans like today.

It has lost considerably the attention of what the AE used to bring to this one, but it is not a bad number.

The article does give out the perfect points to make the company better, or draw more fans back, or make it more interesting.
 

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Typical crap from an IWC nerd who thinks he knows the business more than anyone actually involved in the business.

Wait till the same moron posts an article, 5 years from now on the same site, suggesting to get rid of CM Punk and Daniel Bryan from the main event scene.

Idiots like these who have no grasp of how casual fans view the product, posting stupid ass articles and marks eating it up, are the reason IWC is being looked at as a joke, something to laugh at.



Vince can just buy his stock back.
If his company is profitable which it isnt at the moment and getting worse.

Ratings don't matter when they get a flat fee for Ad and don't translate to buys.
They just did one of the biggest PPV numbers.

Even though PPV is down it does better than most. Boxing does what 5k buys for those shit PPV's but does huge for proper build ups and known attractions.

They just need to cut down on PPV shows and book better.

Doubt Vince gives a shit though. Beat turner and made a billion bucks what else is there to do?

Will die a slow long death with Steph in charge though. Decades to go bros.

Ratings matter and they would end up losing USA network deal if it worsens. Network dont care about PPV buys, thats profit for WWE.
 

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What a horrible article. Full with baseless points and ridiculous assumptions and was probably written by a stereotype clueless internet fan. This is honestly one of the worst I have ever seen, this guy written it pretending to know something about how this business works is like me writing an article about brain surgeries.
 

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What a horrible article. Full with baseless points and ridiculous assumptions and was probably written by a stereotype clueless internet fan. This is honestly one of the worst I have ever seen, this guy written it pretending to know something about how this business works is like me writing an article about brain surgeries.
I'm quite taken aback at your disdain for this article. Out of all people, I thought that you'd be the one to 100% agree with this.

Although I have enjoyed it, I think one of the cons of this article is the insults to HHH. HHH isn't perfect, he made a few mistakes, sure, but let's also remember that HHH is the same guy who's one of the few people that can put reason and logicinto Vince.
 

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This is honestly one of the worst I have ever seen, this guy written it pretending to know something about how this business works is like me writing an article about brain surgeries.
...or you writing an article on how "this business works"

Whoever wrote it is really no different than me or you. You are a fan just like him, so why act like you know how "this business" works when you yourself probably don't either?
 

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I'm quite taken aback at your disdain for this article. Out of all people, I thought that you'd be the one to 100% agree with this.
Even if I agree with some of the points, his mentality and lack of knowledge is too much to ignore. He's trying to mention some meaningless things to back up his baseless argument but forget to add the important aspects, why? because he can't do it without throwing his entire point out of the window.

I agree with him that WWE is dying a slow death, I agree on the real potential money talent like Anderson, MVP and Pope, I agree on The Rock and of course on Stephanie(that's not even opinion...).
 

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Well the hole article could have been like 20 times shorter and still all the points could have been covered. You dont need to be a genius or know backstage policy to know what WWE is doing wrong right now. Just watching WWE for the past 6 years is enough.

"Not to sound like a broken record, but I have said this before and I will say it again: One of the primary reasons the WWE has lost prominence is because they have gone from a system that promoted multiple wrestlers at the top to a system that only has a singular alpha-male: John Cena."

This was pretty much it. Thing with this is, they werent forced to do this, they chose this. Theyve had so many opportunities to create megastars, yet they chose to play it safe and stick with the one they already had. They are like operating in hockey game when 5 minutes left and youre up by one goal. Playing safe and avoiding mistakes. You can do that for a while, but if you play like that too long, eventually you will start conceding.

Im not bashing or praising Cena, but if you remove him now. The ratings would drop dead, like this monday. Many casuals are so in to the fact that Raw is Cena, that I believe lot of them would simply stop watching when Cena leaves. Especially kids. WWE have to start pushing young stars NOW, give them interesting story lines and make them center of raw ASAP, or it will be too late.
 

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Very interesting and powerful read. Losing a third of their total value? Is that hyperbole or some weird loophole definition, or is it literal?

If it's literal then maybe the businessman in Vince will decide that enough is enough, and it's time for a change. But then again, it's Vince.
No it's quite literal. I've been posting it for months and everyone just brushes it off. Check out WWE's balance sheets and it's pretty clear how they shift their assets and are clearly plateauing instead of increasing.
 

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Well the hole article could have been like 20 times shorter and still all the points could have been covered. You dont need to be a genius or know backstage policy to know what WWE is doing wrong right now. Just watching WWE for the past 6 years is enough.

"Not to sound like a broken record, but I have said this before and I will say it again: One of the primary reasons the WWE has lost prominence is because they have gone from a system that promoted multiple wrestlers at the top to a system that only has a singular alpha-male: John Cena."

This was pretty much it. Thing with this is, they werent forced to do this, they chose this. Theyve had so many opportunities to create megastars, yet they chose to play it safe and stick with the one they already had. They are like operating in hockey game when 5 minutes left and youre up by one goal. Playing safe and avoiding mistakes. You can do that for a while, but if you play like that too long, eventually you will start conceding.

Im not bashing or praising Cena, but if you remove him now. The ratings would drop dead, like this monday. Many casuals are so in to the fact that Raw is Cena, that I believe lot of them would simply stop watching when Cena leaves. Especially kids. WWE have to start pushing young stars NOW, give them interesting story lines and make them center of raw ASAP, or it will be too late.
It already is too late. They can't add to a main event scene of one. They had so many opportunities like you said but they blew it. Back then it was easier to create a new star because there were so many, like Rock, Austin, Foley, Taker, HHH, Benoit, Angle, Eddie, Jericho, Brock, Kane, that you can put them into a program against, beat a couple of, and get them over. Now there is only one, John Cena. And you can't have your one and only big star consistently lose either, because since there is only one star, at least he has to look strong, unless its against a guy as good as Punk.
 

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Typical crap from an IWC nerd who thinks he knows the business more than anyone actually involved in the business.

Wait till the same moron posts an article, 5 years from now on the same site, suggesting to get rid of CM Punk and Daniel Bryan from the main event scene.

Idiots like these who have no grasp of how casual fans view the product, posting stupid ass articles and marks eating it up, are the reason IWC is being looked at as a joke, something to laugh at.
I like how you call the writer and IWC out on their idiocy but you do nothing to substantiate your claims. How ironic.

What a horrible article. Full with baseless points and ridiculous assumptions and was probably written by a stereotype clueless internet fan. This is honestly one of the worst I have ever seen, this guy written it pretending to know something about how this business works is like me writing an article about brain surgeries.
ur an lol.
 
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