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I understand that alot of people on Wrestling forum are young and might think of Hogan slamming Andre in the late 80's as the start of the wrestling boom. But in reality A Flair for the gold at the first Starrcade in 83, then in 1984 when Hogan beat Iron Sheik for the belt wrestling was getting huge leading into Flairs feud with Dusty at the second Starrcade with Joe Frazier as the ref. That is when the boom was started. In 1985 Vince responds and we get WrestleMania in MSG with Muhammad Ali as guest ref and later Dusty finally beats Flair in their rematch at Starrcade for the belt. In 1986 the Road Warriors step into the greatest tag team scene ever with the 4 Horsemen and the Midnight & Rockin' Roll Express. Meanwhile WWF has it's greatest batch of stars ever with Savage, Jake, Steamboat, Piper, Orondorff, Big John Stud, Andre, Bundy, Heart Foundation, British Bulldogs. When i look back in reality Hogan slamming Andre in 1987 in front of 93,000 fans was just the pinnacle of wrestling but the real boom was 84-86.
 

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I understand that alot of people on Wrestling forum are young and might think of Hogan slamming Andre in the late 80's as the start of the wrestling boom. But in reality A Flair for the gold at the first Starrcade in 83, then in 1984 when Hogan beat Iron Sheik for the belt wrestling was getting huge leading into Flairs feud with Dusty at the second Starrcade with Joe Frazier as the ref. That is when the boom was started. In 1985 Vince responds and we get WrestleMania in MSG with Muhammad Ali as guest ref and later Dusty finally beats Flair in their rematch at Starrcade for the belt. In 1986 the Road Warriors step into the greatest tag team scene ever with the 4 Horsemen and the Midnight & Rockin' Roll Express. Meanwhile WWF has it's greatest batch of stars ever with Savage, Jake, Steamboat, Piper, Orondorff, Big John Stud, Andre, Bundy, Heart Foundation, British Bulldogs. When i look back in reality Hogan slamming Andre in 1987 in front of 93,000 fans was just the pinnacle of wrestling but the real boom was 84-86.
I dont see how performing such a generic move on a giant is something epic wrestling must sucked so bad back then that such simple things were awesome
 
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I dont see how performing such a generic move on a giant is something epic wrestling must sucked so bad back then that such simple things were awesome
No one here would expect you to understand. Ignorance is bliss so enjoy it and consider yourself right
 

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I understand that alot of people on Wrestling forum are young and might think of Hogan slamming Andre in the late 80's as the start of the wrestling boom. But in reality A Flair for the gold at the first Starrcade in 83, then in 1984 when Hogan beat Iron Sheik for the belt wrestling was getting huge leading into Flairs feud with Dusty at the second Starrcade with Joe Frazier as the ref. That is when the boom was started. In 1985 Vince responds and we get WrestleMania in MSG with Muhammad Ali as guest ref and later Dusty finally beats Flair in their rematch at Starrcade for the belt. In 1986 the Road Warriors step into the greatest tag team scene ever with the 4 Horsemen and the Midnight & Rockin' Roll Express. Meanwhile WWF has it's greatest batch of stars ever with Savage, Jake, Steamboat, Piper, Orondorff, Big John Stud, Andre, Bundy, Heart Foundation, British Bulldogs. When i look back in reality Hogan slamming Andre in 1987 in front of 93,000 fans was just the pinnacle of wrestling but the real boom was 84-86.
93,000 is a myth. Just saying.
 

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No one here would expect you to understand. Ignorance is bliss so enjoy it and consider yourself right
Lol nice avatar you are so modern
OP got a modern avatar too
Hey look this thread is empty what a shocker
 
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The 80s? Who gives a shit about that time period? Why would you want to watch wrestlers whose #1 priority was trying to create a strong character that fans could connect with? And have matches that made sense without having to do a bunch of crazy shit just to get any kind of reaction?

I would much rather see modern wrestling where the most important thing is doing every single move you know how to do in all of your matches so everyone on the internet can see how awesome you are and write good things about you.
 

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I agree 80s was an awesome period to be a fan. 90s on the whole was pretty good too wrestling wise apart from the out of touch characters and storylines we had to endure between late 94 till late 96. It kinda overshadowed some excellent main event matches and angles during that period. IMO 97 was the best year as a wrestling fan. 89 was pretty good too as WCW had some amazing cards while the WWF was pretty strong even though it was clearly past its peak.
 

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The mid-80s being the most important time period in wrestling is debatable, to say the least. After his dad's death from cancer in 1984 Vince, Jr. began the destruction of the territories of Vince, Sr.'s pals/cronies in earnest. So, from the point of view of the spread of the WWWF and monopolization of the industry under the WWF/WWE banner the mid-80s definitely had a historic significance.

However, there have been a number of very important periods in wrestling history that one could argue trump the mid-80s. For example, we could go back to 1908 when Frank Gotch upset George Hackenschmidt and brought the undisputed World Heavyweight Championship to the United States. That was followed by the Gotch/Hackenschmidt rematch in the newly constructed Comiskey Park that drew a crowd of 30,000 - a record that held for 50 years until Rogers/O'Connor on June 30, 1961 in the same venue.

During this period the "chain" style of wrestling was introduced from India to the West and wrestling began moving away from the traditional "static" style practiced in the U.S. and Europe. This was a major milestone in the history of professional wrestling.

However, in my opinion, the Golden Age of Wrestling which is gauged from about 1950 to 1965 trumps the mid-80s as the most important period in the game's history. The Golden Age coincided with the advent and rise of television. Television was a perfect venue for professional wrestling which had been transformed into a faster paced, more cohesive display of athleticism by Buddy Rogers' introduction of "sequencing" which replaced the "chain." George Wagner's persona brought more color to the game which now fit with television like a hand in a glove.

At the time the lack of other viable TV programming was a big plus and gave wrestling a chance to be broadcast into the living rooms of millions of families who would otherwise never have seen a wrestling match!

Kayfabe was at its heyday, sports sections of newspapers reported pro wrestling on an equal footing with other sports, and many people did not suspend disbelief - they actually believed pro-wrestling was for real!

For better or worse, The Golden Age of Wrestling layed the foundation for what has followed today. The mid-80s were a result of that legacy.

- Mike
 

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I dont see how performing such a generic move on a giant is something epic wrestling must sucked so bad back then that such simple things were awesome
This was not just a bodyslam on a giant, the whole build-up and circumstances that led to that moment was what made it special. Andre the Giant was a legend for many years, one of the most beloved wrestlers ever. Hulk Hogan became a phenomenon that only Stone Cold and the Rock have come close to since. The build-up to that match was well-written, well-played out and showed what Vince was capable of when he was on his game. This was a moment that transcended the business back then.

The rock n' wrestling connection of the 80s was an exciting time. Wrestling was cool to watch, whether you were a kid or worked in the office. Many wrestling stars also became celebrities. Hogan, Flair, Road Warriors, Andre, etc. There was also a lot of different organizations to keep tabs on. You could see the WWF, NWA/JCP, AWA, Mid-South/UWF, World Class, Florida, Memphis/CWF, etc. You saw many different styles and you never got bored. I could watch 6 hours of wrestling on Saturday mornings and get to see 6 different organizations...UWF, AWA, NWA, Central States, WWF, and then finished with World Class.
 

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Looking back on that time period it's hard for me to pinpoint one event that started the wave of momentum. That's because I had already been a fan.

I don't think any mainstream momentum for that time period had been achieved until Rocky 3. I mean Andre had done some Late Night Television, and of course Lawler and Kaufman had their deal in 82. Dusty and Flair did their thing, and the Road Warriors were becoming a big deal, but looking back I really think it was Rocky 3 that started the real ball rolling down hill.

Then you had MTV, Lauper, Piper, Albano, and most importantly Mr.T. I cannot explain to some younger fans how big of a deal that was. Mr T was like the hottest property in America and the WWF got him inked for the whole angle, brilliant.

You had cable television booming and the WWF took off. Not to mention the other territories around the nation were also doing big business at the time because, the economy was relatively good, and wrestling was hot.

I think we can all thank Stallone ;)
 
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