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The Men in Black movies are based off humanoids who appear to be aliens, so they aren't even considered people or humans. Has anyone ever heard a Men in Black story where they weren't tall, lanky, bald males with long necks? I feel as though paranormal, myths and cryptids should be safe from this PC bullshit. While we are at it can we change Lizard Man to Lizard Person? Fucking stupid...
 

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There is no duty we so much underrate as... being
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does she forget that you can't spell women without "men"? why is that so offensive to some of these idiots? There's no need to change the name of this or the name of the X-Men ....
Lol X-People. X-Humans.
I also thought she was half-joking here. I don't think she's serious about changing it from Men in Black, but she does want a world where people don't talk about women headlining action movies as a big deal. I want this same world because it's fucking tiring to hear people talk about it when women have been in action movies for actual fucking decades. Do we need and want more? Sure, but it's not new.

Plus I find Tessa to be smoking hot so I MIGHT have a slight bias.
The Men in Black movies are based off humanoids who appear to be aliens, so they aren't even considered people or humans. Has anyone ever heard a Men in Black story where they weren't tall, lanky, bald males with long necks? I feel as though paranormal, myths and cryptids should be safe from this PC bullshit. While we are at it can we change Lizard Man to Lizard Person? Fucking stupid...
The whole point is that "Men in Black" is terminology from the UFO-obsessives who contend that for decades and possibly longer the enigmatic entities stemming from the circulated tale from June 27, 1947 on Puget Sound. It was relayed by the mid-1950s book They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers by Gray Barker.

Harold Dahl, at the time working as a conservationist around the eastern shoreline of Washington's Maury Island, stated that he spotted six doughnut-shaped objects hovering overhead. According to the story, one of the six fell about 1,200-1,400 feet, with metallic debris, which was stated to have hit Dahl's son, Charles, and killed their dog. Fred Crisman, Dahl's supervising official, was given photographs of the flying objects. Crisman went to the location himself to see, and was reported as saying that he saw the doughnut-shaped aircraft, too.

Dahl said that an unwelcome visitor arrived the next morning in a black suit, who impressed upon Dahl that he knew about the event of the previous evening, and told Dahl to keep quiet.

The U.S. government declared the entire matter a hoax.

BUT OF COURSE THEY WOULD!!!

And subsequent "men in black" stories have bounced around the far reaches of UFO/paranormal studies. Intriguingly The X-Files beat the Men in Black franchise to the punch, so to speak, with a Season 3 episode featuring a Jesse Ventura cameo in which the fabled "men in black" is referenced, "Jose Chung's From Outer Space."

Of course that episode was exceptionally clever in deploying a Citizen Kane/Rashomon-style alternating perspective narrative, in which witnesses provide wildly disparate accounts of the same events. In one such case, a character labels Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) as one of the notorious and eerie "Men in Black" alongside her FBI Agent partner Fox Mulder (David Duchovny). He does state, for the sake of humor (since it is one of the series's better comedy-centric episodes), that Scully was trying to pull off being a woman but not altogether well. By contrast, Mulder, so stone-faced and chilly, is considered to likely be an android by this possibly untrustworthy storyteller.

So "Men in Black," or Men in Black, as the title of a 1990s Ghostbusters-style aliens investigation agency Hollywood spoof (turned serial with its nascent spin-off) has an historic rationale beyond the rather obvious point pertaining to aforementioned language-related matters.
 

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The Empire will Reign again
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The whole point is that "Men in Black" is terminology from the UFO-obsessives who contend that for decades and possibly longer the enigmatic entities stemming from the circulated tale from June 27, 1947 on Puget Sound. It was relayed by the mid-1950s book They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers by Gray Barker.

Harold Dahl, at the time working as a conservationist around the eastern shoreline of Washington's Maury Island, stated that he spotted six doughnut-shaped objects hovering overhead. According to the story, one of the six fell about 1,200-1,400 feet, with metallic debris, which was stated to have hit Dahl's son, Charles, and killed their dog. Fred Crisman, Dahl's supervising official, was given photographs of the flying objects. Crisman went to the location himself to see, and was reported as saying that he saw the doughnut-shaped aircraft, too.

Dahl said that an unwelcome visitor arrived the next morning in a black suit, who impressed upon Dahl that he knew about the event of the previous evening, and told Dahl to keep quiet.

The U.S. government declared the entire matter a hoax.

BUT OF COURSE THEY WOULD!!!

And subsequent "men in black" stories have bounced around the far reaches of UFO/paranormal studies. Intriguingly The X-Files beat the Men in Black franchise to the punch, so to speak, with a Season 3 episode featuring a Jesse Ventura cameo in which the fabled "men in black" is referenced, "Jose Chung's From Outer Space."

Of course that episode was exceptionally clever in deploying a Citizen Kane/Rashomon-style alternating perspective narrative, in which witnesses provide wildly disparate accounts of the same events. In one such case, a character labels Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) as one of the notorious and eerie "Men in Black" alongside her FBI Agent partner Fox Mulder (David Duchovny). He does state, for the sake of humor (since it is one of the series's better comedy-centric episodes), that Scully was trying to pull off being a woman but not altogether well. By contrast, Mulder, so stone-faced and chilly, is considered to likely be an android by this possibly untrustworthy storyteller.

So "Men in Black," or Men in Black, as the title of a 1990s Ghostbusters-style aliens investigation agency Hollywood spoof (turned serial with its nascent spin-off) has an historic rationale beyond the rather obvious point pertaining to aforementioned language-related matters.
What are your thoughts on the Fermi paradox?
 

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Devil's Blood
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Men in Black nickname is based on the phenomenon of anonymous government men visiting UFO abductees or people who have seen or interacted with extra terrestrial happenings. It's been around since its inception. It's the proper term.

People In Black sounds completely moronic. This franchise is now 3 films deep past what it should've had anyways. First movie was only one worth a shit and I'm not even huge into it.
 

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Just for amusement
 

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Ex Con With A Heart Of Gold
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I feel I would be amiss if I didn't mention the fact that Men in Black is an intergalactic agency that starting from Malibu Comics onwards, and especially as established in the cartoon series and film series, has many "Men" in Black agents that are neither male nor even human. The reason Earth's alien issues agency has so many human men in it is that they begin in 1940s Earth and recruited from military members, government agents and police officers in the 1940s. Every other planet aware of aliens has its own "Men in Black" style agency, needless to say the agents are not White Male Earthlings.

After going to BoxOfficeMojo and RottenTomatoes they're going to need to change it to Slim Pickins in Black because they're going to need to learn how to love the bomb.

Edit: The film franchise went off the rails when the actress who portrayed the County Medical Examiner Laura Weaver character, Linda Fiorentino didn't reprise her role and feature in the franchise as Agent L. The woman heading up the 4th MIB isn't up to snuff.
 

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There is no duty we so much underrate as... being
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What are your thoughts on the Fermi paradox?
It is exceedingly fascinating to consider, and the entire premise reminds one of an excellently piquant line of dialogue from Carlo Emilio Gadda's murder mystery novel which roughly translates from the original Italian, That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana, from the protagonist who contends that when looking to uncover the reasons why for something, one should look at the interconnecting constellation of influencing points, and that it is never quite one thing.

Enrico Fermi's simple conversation in summer 1950 at Los Alamos with Edward Teller and Emil Konopinski was presumably over lunch and they discussed the idea of aliens in outer space, and wondering aloud, "Where are they?" or "Where is everybody?" the latter of which as a questioning phrase became the first-ever episode of Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone, is worth pondering.

Fermi's contention regarding the millenniums of years' required for travel versus the potential probability that at the very least some stars possess qualities resembling this planet on which we live with the possibility that a race of beings has formulated the means by which to make the interstellar trek seems like a plausible explanation unto itself. Having said that, scientist David Brin provides provocative insights relating to the nuances into which one could delve.

Michael Bodin wrote a solid book that I read a few years ago on the Fermi paradox when it was brand new. It convincingly established the point that when weighing the biological progression and evolution of life, communication seems to be of a vanishing potentiality. The book was hardly groundbreaking but it was reasonably well-balanced while almost single-mindedly pursuing the cosmological ramifications, which is Bodin's one undeniably fecund contribution.

It does fit with what is known of our own development of inquiries pertaining to the possibilities beyond our own planetary concerns that myriad other stars that have older beings may take much longer in sharing the curiosity displayed by at least some homo sapiens. Also enjoy reading about the "water world" hypothesis which David Brin makes entertainingly fascinating. The earth being more pronouncedly covered by land with large continents is at least a reasonable position.
 
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Used to be a Dreamer, Dreamin' of a Fire
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Thanks to post-modernism, you can have a movie called Men in Black with women in it.

The movie was really bad for the record. All it did was make me miss Will Smith
 
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