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The EST of NXT
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

This shit is so draining to read about every day. Literally EVERY day this week we've heard about some retarded racist cop getting off for MURDERING an innocent Black person "because they felt threatened." Now, it's extended INTO the police force. I wonder how the closet racists who shout "COMPLY" are responding to this one.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/white-st-louis-police-officer-shoots-off-duty-black-officer/

A black off-duty St. Louis police officer was shot by a white on-duty police officer from the same department who apparently mistook him for a fleeing suspect, according to a statement from the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department.

At about 10 p.m. Wednesday evening, St. Louis police received a report that a stolen vehicle had been spotted. Officers laid down spike strips and turned on their lights, but the occupants of the vehicle allegedly opened fire on police. Officers followed the car until it crashed.

According to the police statement, the armed suspects then fled on foot. Meanwhile, an off-duty officer who lived near where the crash occurred came outside with his department issued firearm after hearing the commotion.

Two officers "challenged the off-duty officer and ordered him to the ground," the department said. The officer complied and once they recognized him the on-duty officers told him "to stand up and walk toward them."

At about the same time, another officer who had just arrived on the scene saw what was happening and "fearing for his safety and apparently not recognizing the off-duty officer, discharged a shot, striking the off-duty officer in the arm."

The injured officer was taken to the hospital and has since been released. He is described as 38 year old with 11 years of service. The department says that the officer who allegedly shot him is 36 years old with over eight years of service.

Two of the three suspects in the stolen car chase were taken into custody and booked on $500,000 cash bond. One suspect is still at large.

Seven officers have been placed on administrative leave while the shooting is investigated.
 

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Re: St. Louis Policeman Shoots Off Duty Black Officer "Because He Felt Threatened"

At this point the whole of the police force needs to be disassembled and reorganized
 

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Re: St. Louis Policeman Shoots Off Duty Black Officer "Because He Felt Threatened"

At this point the whole of the police force needs to be disassembled and reorganized
And retrained, Jesus Christ.

At this point, the qualifications for law enforcement should be raised to the upteenth degree. I'd rather have a bunch of Judge Dredds walking around than Chief Wiggums.
 
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Re: St. Louis Policeman Shoots Off Duty Black Officer "Because He Felt Threatened"

And retrained, Jesus Christ.
That too. And aren't tranq guns available these days?
 

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Magic, sparkles and Strap-ons!
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I agree with the dismantling because obviously there is a flaw in the recruitment or training part.

There needs to be a lot more training, I'm talking 2 years of training + another 2 of duty before becoming an official cop.

You got a bunch of morons and jumpy scaredy cats shooting people because they're either inept, racist, morons or should have never got the job. I think more than anything it's the hiring of inept people.
 

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There's has to be some sort of standard operating procedure in place for cops that walk into a possible crime scene late and don't have the whole story. Has to be. I don't see any grey in this one. There is a gargantuan difference between feeling scared and rationalizing that your life is in danger. Doesn't look like cops today are trained to understand the difference. As long as "feeling threatened" justifies a gun legally this will never change. Until cops fear that they might not be able to prove they had sufficient reason to shoot this will never change.
 

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Two officers "challenged the off-duty officer and ordered him to the ground," the department said. The officer complied and once they recognized him the on-duty officers told him "to stand up and walk toward them."

At about the same time, another officer who had just arrived on the scene saw what was happening and "fearing for his safety and apparently not recognizing the off-duty officer, discharged a shot, striking the off-duty officer in the arm."
He was walking toward them after he was told to get on the ground, would it stand to reason he either had his hands up, or behind his head? You see that and shoot? Even if you did feel threatened and thought he was a legit criminal, did it not occur to tell him to put his hands up? To ask the other officers what was going on?

The injured officer was taken to the hospital and has since been released. He is described as 38 year old with 11 years of service. The department says that the officer who allegedly shot him is 36 years old with over eight years of service.
8 years of service and not only do you not recognize someone from your department, but you feel so threatened by someone who is unarmed, while you are armed and have two other officers there with you.
 

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There's has to be some sort of standard operating procedure in place for cops that walk into a possible crime scene late and don't have the whole story. Has to be. I don't see any grey in this one. There is a gargantuan difference between feeling scared and rationalizing that your life is in danger. Doesn't look like cops today are trained to understand the difference. As long as "feeling threatened" justifies a gun legally this will never have change. Until cops fear that they might not be able to prove they had sufficient reason to shoot this will never change.
Police are trained to be scared shitless of every situation. It is repeatedly drilled into their heads for years and years that everyone is potentially the enemy and could kill them at any moment. No wonder they end up pulling their guns and shooting at the slightest things.

Excerpt from an article written by former police officer Seth Stoughton.

Police training starts in the academy, where the concept of officer safety is so heavily emphasized that it takes on almost religious significance. Rookie officers are taught what is widely known as the “first rule of law enforcement”: An officer’s overriding goal every day is to go home at the end of their shift. But cops live in a hostile world. They learn that every encounter, every individual is a potential threat. They always have to be on their guard because, as cops often say, “complacency kills.”

Officers aren’t just told about the risks they face. They are shown painfully vivid, heart-wrenching dash-cam footage of officers being beaten, disarmed, or gunned down after a moment of inattention or hesitation. They are told that the primary culprit isn’t the felon on the video, it is the officer’s lack of vigilance. And as they listen to the fallen officer’s last, desperate radio calls for help, every cop in the room is thinking exactly the same thing: “I won’t ever let that happen to me.” That’s the point of the training.

More pointed lessons come in the form of hands-on exercises. One common scenario teaches officers that a suspect leaning into a car can pull out a gun and shoot at officers before they can react. Another teaches that even when an officer are pointing a gun at a suspect whose back is turned, the suspect can spin around and fire first. Yet another teaches that a knife-carrying suspect standing 20 feet away can run up to an officer and start stabbing before the officer can get their gun out of the holster. There are countless variations, but the lessons are the same: Hesitation can be fatal. So officers are trained to shoot before a threat is fully realized, to not wait until the last minute because the last minute may be too late.

But what about the consequences of a mistake? After all, that dark object in the suspect’s hands could be a wallet, not a gun. The occasional training scenario may even make that point. But officers are taught that the risks of mistake are less—far less—than the risks of hesitation. A common phrase among cops pretty much sums it up: “Better to be judged by twelve than carried by six.”

In most police shootings, officers don’t shoot out of anger or frustration or hatred. They shoot because they are afraid. And they are afraid because they are constantly barraged with the message that that they should be afraid, that their survival depends on it. Not only do officers hear it in formal training, they also hear it informally from supervisors and older officers. They talk about it with their peers. They see it on police forums and law enforcement publications. For example, three of the four stories mentioned on the cover of this month’s Police Magazine are about dealing with threats to officer safety.

Officers’ actions are grounded in their expectations, and they are taught to expect the worst. The officers who shot John Crawford may have honestly believed that he was raising his rifle to a shooting position even though security camera footage shows him on the phone, casually swinging the BB gun back and forth. The same may be true of the Phoenix officer who shot an unarmed man because he thought, mistakenly, that the suspect had a gun in his waistband. The officers saw what they were afraid of. They saw what they were trained to see. And they did what they had been taught to do. That’s the problem.
 

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I agree with the dismantling because obviously there is a flaw in the recruitment or training part.

There needs to be a lot more training, I'm talking 2 years of training + another 2 of duty before becoming an official cop.

You got a bunch of morons and jumpy scaredy cats shooting people because they're either inept, racist, morons or should have never got the job. I think more than anything it's the hiring of inept people.
What exactly are they supposed to learn for these 4 years? And who is paying them for these 4 years? Also what do we do about the fact that there would be no new police officers for 4 years?
 

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tombstone blues
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cmon guys he was scared

havent you ever been scared and winged someone who already had guns aimed at him
 

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It seems as though police in the US are essentially taught to be on guard in completely wrong way in every given situation where there is a deemed threat. It certainly seems that way with this incredibly messed up case. I don't know how you can mess up as badly as the police officer here.

Tragic.
 
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