Wrestling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 84 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
965 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am surprised no one put this here?

Later this week, a cricket phenomenon whose talent captured the hearts of a billion Indians, will play his last test match – an unparalleled 200th. That could be curtains for a gigantic brand called Sachin Tendulkar whose massive appeal dominated the big-money game and sold dozens of products, leveling with every stratum of India.

Tendulkar’s brand allure was on full display early this week as ticket-hungry hordes swarmed the Wankhede stadium in his home town Mumbai where his last cricket game, an India versus West Indies five-day match, is to start on Nov 14. But the fans returned disappointed as a meager 6,000 tickets are to be sold, and only online. Local media reported that website Kyazoonga.com which offered online ticketing crashed after being hit by millions of visitors.

Tendulkar’s middle-class background, his dazzling rise as a world cricketing great and his unfussy demeanor made him popular with dozens of Indian and multinational advertisers for an unusually long two-and-a-half decade career. His longevity and impeccable record, untarnished despite a spate of scandals and outrage in the game of cricket, will make his brand near-impossible to replace.

Tendulkar made his prodigious debut in 1989 at the age of 16, amassing a multitude of world records along the way. His climb coincided with India’s own economic rise, landing him multi-million dollar endorsement deals with brands such as Coca-Cola, Adidas, Toshiba, Canon and Visa. Tendulkar ranks #51 in Forbes’ list of the World’s Highest-Paid Athletes.

The 40-year old Tendulkar’s brand appeal may continue to sell products and services past his test match retirement. Many Indians fondly say, ‘cricket is our religion and Sachin our god’. For now, brands are piggybacking his swansong game. Twitter honored Tendulkar by asking users to tweet messages to him and the Indian cricket board with the hashtag #ThankYouSachin in return for a digital autograph of the icon. Brands like Adidas and Coca-Cola have said that they will continue their endorsement relationships with Tendulkar.

But some advertisers secretly fear that the attraction could wane on the dip in visibility of a star who had a billion Indians glued to their television and mobile screens year-round for close to 25 years. This week, the Tendulkar brand will bring India to a halt one last time as he marches to the crease to wield his genius bat in his last test match. That too will be a fitting farewell for the humble icon – Tendulkar’s mother who has never seen her son play an international game, is to watch him live from the spectator stands.
Forbes

Well goodbye but 24 years is too long in cricket, far too long considering when I started watching in 2001 people retired at 33 and now people retire at 42.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
586 Posts
Have to agree he stayed on to long and did put himself above the team in later years going after records. Great player with a great record though.
 

·
Locker Room Leader
Joined
·
12,168 Posts
It's amazing when you think he's been playing international cricket for more than half his life.
 

·
Locker Room Leader
Joined
·
12,168 Posts
Should have retired after winning the 2011 World Cup imo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
One of the All Time Greats, too bad moronic edge tweens try to belittle his performances, without giving a semblance of an explanation. His ODI career strike rate was higher than almost all of his contemporaries, and somebody in this thread said he played to slow in ODI's, toplel.

Average of over 50 in AUS, ENG played against some of the fiercest bowling attacks, most importantly a great role model. His time has definitely come though, no doubt his love for the game kept him playing these past 2 years, at least he managed to help groom the next generation instead of being just a passenger.
 

·
Locker Room Leader
Joined
·
12,168 Posts
Yeah I was shocked when someone said he had a low run rate (which should be strike rate anyway).
 
  • Like
Reactions: BOOTS 2 ASSES

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Amazing crowd reaction,and amazing penultimate knock(perhaps the very last since its highly unlikely that we would bat again).


Fare thee well to simply the Greatest Batsman Ever in International Cricket history.#Thank You Sachin


I can go on and on about his inimitable class and unsurpassable greatness,but rather I leave you all with this quote from Pakistani Legend Hanif Mohammad:

"I am one of those fortunate people who have seen Bradman and Tendulkar bat in my lifetime and in my opinion Tendulkar is the best batsman I have seen in my life."


Once again Than you Sachin,thanks for the memories.You will always be the greatest to ever weild that cricketing bat.




Sachin Sachin,Sachin Sachin!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
586 Posts
Amazing crowd reaction,and amazing penuntimate knock(perhaps the very last since its highly unlikely that we would bat again).


Fare thee well to simply the Greatest Batsman Ever in International Cricket history.#Thank You Sachin


I can go on and on about his inimitable class and unsurpassable greatness,but rather I leave you all with this quote from Pakistani Legend Hanif Mohammad:

"I am one of those fortunate people who have seen Bradman and Tendulkar bat in my lifetime and in my opinion Tendulkar is the best batsman I have seen in my life."


Once again Than you Sachin,thanks for the memories.You will always be the greatest to ever weild that cricketing bat.



Sachin Sachin,Sachin Sachin!
Bradman 99.94>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>!>>>>>
G.Pollock 60.97
G.Headley 60.83
H.Sutcliffe 60.73
E.Paynter 59.23
K.Barrington 58.67
E.Weekes 58.61
W.Hammond 58.45
G.Sobers 57.78















S.Tendulkar 53.71

Indians have a different perspective from the rest of the World.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Out for 74 in his last Test, played some great shots felt like he turned back time a bit. Felt like it was the best he played over the last 2 years. Goodbye to an icon, his last walk back to the pavilion felt surreal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,536 Posts
Batting averages rarely tell the whole story though. Brian Lara is arguably the greatest batsman of his generation. He's the best Test batsman after Bradman but he doesn't have a better average than Graeme Pollock. That's partly because he was busy batting alongside Walsh and Ambrose forming a 10th wicket partnership with them for much of his career. My Lord, West Indies of back then when they had Jimmy f'kin Adams and Sherwin Campbell.

Michael Bevan has the second greatest batting average in ODIs but that doesn't make him a better batsman than Sachin. Bevan was one of my favorites back then, btw.

Tendulkar is the most accomplished batsman of all time. Undeniably, he is. He is/was special, gifted. But I'd place Lara ahead of him from his generation.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Funny how Lara and Sachin are both so exceedingly humble while Sachin fans are as rabid as can be.

Lara was on commentary today, along with Dravid and Warne, sharing stories. Was amazing to see so many legends on commentary on this occasion.

I hate comparisons amongst the top players, because most of their performances are decided by context. Each one should be appreciated for what they bring to the game. Best amongst equals, I'd say. Obviously, I have to say that Bradman is above all of them (i think he is, 99.94 says everything, but for me it was a completely different era, which makes it hard to compare), or the rabid Aussies would dismiss my opinion.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
19,407 Posts
Lara having a poor average has nowt to do with him batting with the tail, it has everything to do with the fact that the West Indies were utter garbage in the late 90's. If i had to rank the top 3 batsmen of this generation then it would be Sachin, Ponting, Lara.

I would also argue that Bevan is the greatest one day player of all time. Bloke was an absolute match winner. If you had to back one bloke to get you home in a match then Bevan is right up there.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
586 Posts
I wouldn't say averages rarely say the whole story even though other factors do need to be considered when weighing up how good a batsman is. Take Bradman in one series he averaged considerably less then his career average (56 against England Bodyline series) and that average is still better then most class batsmen overall average. One series his average dropped considerably, no one else can say that only one series did their batting average drop considerably. Averages show consistentcy over time but you can make cases that a batsmens average who is a quality player won't be as high as someone slightly less good because batting position, quality of their team or type of pitches they play on. The point I'm making is Bradman is so far ahead of any batsmen to play the game and his Test and First Class average clearly show that. To say Tendulkar who is a great player and has a fantastic record is better because he played four times as many Tests and made more runs (no shit he played four times as many Test he was hardly going to make less :fpalm) then Bradman is sheer stupidity and Bradmans consistent Test and First Class average shows that.
As far as Lara vs Tendulkar for best batsman of their generation goes thats a hard one, you could make cases for both players. Lara made the bigger scores and played in a poor team where as Tendulkar was more consistent. Against Australia Tendulkar and Lara both were fantastic but McGrath had the wood on Lara whereas no Australian bowler had the wood on Tendulkar. Lara against Australia 1993 and 1999 were his outstanding series against us (wasn't as dominate other series iirc) where as Tendulkar 1991,1998,2000, 2004, 2008 scored centuries and was consistent against the best team in the world at the time. But again it's hard to separate them, case for each can be convincly made.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
19,407 Posts
Funny how Lara and Sachin are both so exceedingly humble while Sachin fans are as rabid as can be.

Lara was on commentary today, along with Dravid and Warne, sharing stories. Was amazing to see so many legends on commentary on this occasion.

I hate comparisons amongst the top players, because most of their performances are decided by context. Each one should be appreciated for what they bring to the game. Best amongst equals, I'd say. Obviously, I have to say that Bradman is above all of them (i think he is, 99.94 says everything, but for me it was a completely different era, which makes it hard to compare), or the rabid Aussies would dismiss my opinion.
It does make it hard to compare but look at how much the game has changed in the favour of the batsman nowadays. Pitches used to be uncovered, no fielding restrictions (until after Bodyline anyway), bats were thin as with less of a middle, boundaries were far bigger, no helmets etc etc. Bradman is that far ahead of anyone from his generation, and that far ahead of anyone else who has ever swung the willow it would be ridiculous to disregard him.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
586 Posts
Innings per Centuries ratio
Bradman 2.75 uncovered pitches, no helmets, primitive bats, the fence was the boundary
Tendulkar 6.45 covered/flat pitches, technology make bats hit harder/longer, protective helmets, rope pulled in metres from boundary

No comparison. Enough said.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
It's funny how people bring up shit like uncovered pitches and helmets as if people who played in that era were inhuman or something, the fact is that the bowling was extremely average and the amount of cricket played on genuinely rain affected pitches was limited, and when the wicket did turn sticky, Bradman's average dipped to 20.29.

Bradman on rain affected sticky wickets -

Wicket I Runs Ave 100s 50s 0s
Normal 65 6712 119.90 29 12 3
Sticky 15 284 20.29 0 1 4

Cricket has evolved, helmets were a necessity in the 70's due to how bowling changed, serious injuries during Bradman's era was infrequent prior to Bodyline. While injurues during West Indes reign of fury was exceedingly common, leading to believe that bowling had evolved into more of a weapon.

Apart from the brief period surrounding the Bodyline series, fast bowling was seldom successful during the era of Bradman, Hammond and the rest. If we go through the scorecards, most of the Tests were played with attacks spearheaded by two to three spin bowlers.

The period was ruled by batsmen, spinners, medium pacers and fast bowlers – in that order.
http://m.cricketcountry.com/cricket...n's-average-on-sticky-wickets-was-20-29/19492

I'd argue that Gavaskar faced tougher bowling than Bradman given that he faced the West Indian pace battery without a helmet and opened the batting and ended up averaging 50+, and no one would argue that the mediocre pace bowling of the 1930's was anywhere close to the West Indian attack. Sunil Gavaskar averaged 65.45 against the West Indies. I actually rate Gavaskar and Dravid higher than Sachin in terms of Indian batsmen.

I think the one thing we can all agree on was the Bradman was head and shoulders above his peers at that time. Cricket was a more of a pastime, than a professional sport during that period. I honestly dont think that the opposition Bradman faced before Bodyline and the evolution of bowling can be compared to the the bowling modern batsmen faced after the 1970's.
 
1 - 20 of 84 Posts
Top