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Okay, so I'll kick things off with Owen Hart. I'm a huge fan of Owen & really felt the "Black-Hart" gimmick was the beginning of something really exciting for him.

After taking a brief hiatus following SS '97, Owen returned to the WWF as a lone wolf & a score to settle. The Black Hart had major beef with both Vince & DX, with two seemingly ready-made feuds waiting right there on the table for him. Owen first made an impact by repeatedly attacking WWF champ HBK during his matches, storming the ring at unexpected times from the crowd, but it was when he confronted none other than Vince McMahon his stock started to truly rise. And boy, was he ever over at that time! The crowd were firmly in Owen's corner without a shadow of a doubt. Owen was a truly unpredictable entity during this timeframe & had completed a genuine 180 by turning from a heel to a face with some righteous indignation.

Saldy though, the push fizzled when he was politicked out of the main-event, booked to lose against HBK on an episode of Raw & was eventually shoehorned into the NOD for no real reason at all. Owen would never return to the main event scene following this move.

My idea? To give the fans a bit of a feel good moment, especially after the controversial endings to both the One Night Only (UK) & Survivor Series PPVs, sometime in early 1998. Owen defeats Shawn Michaels at the 1998 Royal Rumble to capture his first and only WWF World Championship, before losing it back to HBK at the February PPV, No Way Out of Texas, which in turn sets up the HBK/Austin/Tyson conflict at WM 1998. Owen would then peel off into a feud with HHH, before going on to face opponents such as Ken Shamrock & Dan Severn throughout the rest of the year.



Owen Hart: WWF Champion January 18, 1998 - February 15, 1998

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What are some scenarios that you could imagine happening in a perfect world?
 

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In the 80's WWE Piper could have gotten the belt briefly in 84.

There are litterally dozens of heels who could have broken up Hogan's title run and made it fresh.

But the WWE was stuck in old school storytelling.

Orndorff, Piper, Rude, Dibiase, Andre...It would not have hurt the product to have made those moves. I guess I just grew up watching a wrestling product where the belts changed hands often. But the WWE was a company that thought long term babyface title runs were what folks wanted.

No one will even know if switching the titles could have helped like the quicker changes of the late 90's.
 

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In the 80's WWE Piper could have gotten the belt briefly in 84.

There are litterally dozens of heels who could have broken up Hogan's title run and made it fresh.

But the WWE was stuck in old school storytelling.

Orndorff, Piper, Rude, Dibiase, Andre...It would not have hurt the product to have made those moves. I guess I just grew up watching a wrestling product where the belts changed hands often. But the WWE was a company that thought long term babyface title runs were what folks wanted.

No one will even know if switching the titles could have helped like the quicker changes of the late 90's.
If I was booking WWF/E back then, I would have booked Piper to win the belt from Hogan at the War To Settle The Score in February 1985. Imagine Madison Square Garden about to riot when Hogan gets cheated out of the title. Then book the rematch as the main event of the first Wrestlemania.
 

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If I was booking WWF/E back then, I would have booked Piper to win the belt from Hogan at the War To Settle The Score in February 1985. Imagine Madison Square Garden about to riot when Hogan gets cheated out of the title. Then book the rematch as the main event of the first Wrestlemania.
I gotta disagree with that. Feel the inclusion of the celebrities at WM 1 was vital to its success.

Also, I think Hogan holding the belt for as long as he did was what really helped prolong Hulkamania. I don't disagree with preferring more title changes in general, but I think that was partly why that run was so successful. Then again we'll never really know one way or the other haha.
 

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In hindsight the idea of anyone in pro wrestling defending a belt for more than a year is horribly outdated.

I have gained more respect for companies who changed titles more often.

I understand what the AWA, NWA, and WWE were doing in the 70's and 80's but I think the smaller companies like World Class, Memphis and Mid South were more believable because they actually turned over their belts more often. Especially in the kayfabe era.

The UFC is case and point. There are very few fighters who can actually hold on to their titles.
 

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I gotta disagree with that. Feel the inclusion of the celebrities at WM 1 was vital to its success.

Also, I think Hogan holding the belt for as long as he did was what really helped prolong Hulkamania. I don't disagree with preferring more title changes in general, but I think that was partly why that run was so successful. Then again we'll never really know one way or the other haha.
You could still have the pomp and circumstance of the celebrities at Wrestlemania. The only thing changing would be Mr. T鈥檚 role on the card. Here鈥檚 how I would have booked it鈥

Orndorff jumped in when the referee was down (in the real match that鈥檚 where everything started to break down). Cyndi Lauper jumped on the apron and when Piper and Mr. Wonderful came to confront her was when Mr. T jumped into the fray. Piper jumps T from behind and Orndorff and Hogan join in. Orton is getting involved at this point as police and security swarm the ring. The referee at that moment came to his senses and disqualified Hot Rod. That鈥檚 how it actually went down.

In my booking, Orton hands Piper a pair of brass knuckles or roll of coins. As Orton and Orndorff tend to beating on Mr. T on the floor, th茅 match continues with Piper blasting the champ with the foreign object. He tosses the offending weapon out and covers the Hulkster as the referee (just coming to) makes the three count. The police and security now focus on dealing with the fans who throw trash into the ring and a few brave souls start to climb the railing. In the pandemonium (in the words of Gorilla Monsoon), Piper and his cronies get the hell out of the ring and back to the dressing rooms with the belt.

During the post-match happenings, Hogan is furious about getting screwed. Alan Hunter and Mean Gene interview WWF President Jack Tunney who says he will review the footage and get to the bottom of the situation.

Two weeks later, Piper is holding a celebration on Piper鈥檚 Pit with food and champagne. He then announces his surprise guest which is Tunney. Tunney says he has a gift for the new Champ鈥he object used to win the belt for Hot Rod. Piper says the referee raised his hand and that鈥檚 that. Tunney says he鈥檚 right and he is the WWF champion for now. However, Hogan is exercising his rematch clause and on March 31 at the original Wrestlemania the rematch will take place. Orndorff and Orton in Piper鈥檚 corner, Captain Lou Albano and Mr. T (who has been granted a manager鈥檚 license) in Hulkster鈥檚 corner. Further, the match will take place inside a steel cage to prevent outside interference. Piper throws a tantrum and overturns the feast and breaks the champagne bottles.

Hogan goes on to beat Piper in the rematch and exits the cage to regain the title. He鈥檚 helped by T who fights off both Orton and Mr. Wonderful to allow the referee to open the cage door and Hogan exits for the win.

In hindsight the idea of anyone in pro wrestling defending a belt for more than a year is horribly outdated.

I have gained more respect for companies who changed titles more often.

I understand what the AWA, NWA, and WWE were doing in the 70's and 80's but I think the smaller companies like World Class, Memphis and Mid South were more believable because they actually turned over their belts more often. Especially in the kayfabe era.

The UFC is case and point. There are very few fighters who can actually hold on to their titles.
The lower belts I can live with being passed around more often. But I think you should hold the top title to a higher standard. If not a year-plus, at least a six month reign is in order for your World champ. Passing the belt around like a bowl of mashed potatoes cheapens it in my eyes.
 

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When I think of the guys that didn't get the belt, there are "Could Haves" and "Should Haves"

I'll use someone I am a mark for as an example. Rick Rude is someone I am a huge fan of, loved his work, and his overall presentation. However, I never felt like he got to the point where he ABSOLUTELY NEEDED to get the World Title. He did just fine at that upper midcard IC Title level and did very well with it. And then in WCW there was that confusing situation where he was the International Champ and there was a separate World Champ...ok. But Rick Rude is someone that I would absolutely love to have on my roster, but never looked back on as a guy that should have gotten the belt. But had they done it, I wouldn't have been opposed to it either. Its a weird position. If they were ever going to pull the trigger on Rude, I guess 1990 would have been the time to try and in WCW, I guess 1992 would have been a good time to try it (though he was on the same roster as Vader, who was the best option for a heel champion at that point).

Paul Orndorff is a similar position. Had they given him the belt during his feud with Hogan, I wouldn't have been opposed to it, but everything worked out fine the way it did any way, so I don't necessarily see it as a missed opportunity either.

The "Should Haves" to me, especially during that 1980s period, are Roddy Piper and Ted DiBiase. In 1984-1985, there was no heel hotter than Piper and I feel like he should have gotten the belt from Hogan at some point. To see that over the top personality holding the strap and saying whatever he wanted would have been amazing. Ted DiBiase, in 1988, was the top heel without question and that angle they shot for The Main Event was one of the best things the WWF/E ever did. If it were up to me, his title reign would have been upheld and he would have gone in WrestleMania IV as the defending champion. If he drops it quickly to Savage, then so be it, but to me I really would have liked to have seen DiBiase as an official world champ because no heel was hotter at that point.
 

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Ted DiBiase would have made a great late 80s heel champion. I picture him like one of the kingpin bosses you have to fight at the end of an old NES game. He isn't always the biggest or strongest, but he's tough to beat due to how clever he is and because he has so many people working for him to help him hold onto the belt. Would make for a very rewarding victory for Randy Savage to dethrone him at WrestleMania 4, especially with DiBiase defeating Hogan for the belt and possibly even having a successful title defense against him before facing Savage at WrestleMania.
 

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Anyways to give my answer here's a couple off the top of my head....

Farooq: WWF Champion from RAW: February 17th, 1997 to WrestleMania 13: March 23rd, 1997.
Could have won the title on the February 17th, 1997 RAW. Just slot him in Sid's place and everything stays the same. Can still build to the Hart/Austin feud and get the belt on Undertaker etc.

Mike Awesome: WCW Champion from Slamboree: May 7th, 2000 - Bash at the Beach: July 9th, 2000.
Could have just had Awesome as the face of the "New Blood" and let Bischoff do all the talking. Would have resulted in better matches probably.
Sure he was 35 in 2000, but that was young for ol' Wheel Chair Wrestling.
 

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As for Hogan: I think he should've lost the belt sometime after Wrestlemania 3. During those months he had no real opponents (he fought the likes of Sika and Killer Khan, you can't take that serious) and a heel Champion would've been a good chance of pace.
At the time they wanted to do a feud with Jake Roberts and that's definitely something i would've wanted to see. Especially on the promo level this would've been just good and you can book it believable by just going the Rocky 3 route: Hogan gets too arrogant and comfortable after defeating everybody and slaying the Giant. He considers himself untouchable, undefeatable. Roberts comes around and in a shocking upset defeats him. Hogan is stunned, the world is stunned. He pisses off for a couple weeks, while Roberts defeats contenders. Hogan comes back, says he is refocused, realized his errors and arrogance and Hulkamania is stronger than ever. He regains the belt in a re-match.

And speaking of Roberts: I also think that a short run in 1992 in WCW would've worked in his feud with Sting. It certainly would've been better than watching Ron Simmons destroy their entire business for months. The only thing preventing that was Bill Watts though.

Mike Awesome: WCW Champion from Slamboree: May 7th, 2000 - Bash at the Beach: July 9th, 2000.
Could have just had Awesome as the face of the "New Blood" and let Bischoff do all the talking. Would have resulted in better matches probably.
Anything that prevents Jeff Jarrett from holding a belt is a good idea in my book. Awesome got completely screwed over by Russo. Those gimmicks...ugh. He definitely deserved better. He actually was a pretty good wrestler, great look, had charisma and a great powerbomb. I can imagine him working as Champion for a short run.

Sure he was 35 in 2000, but that was young for ol' Wheel Chair Wrestling.
Would've been young for the WWF as well, considering they put the belt on a 54 year old non-wrestler 馃槣
 

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I gotta disagree with that. Feel the inclusion of the celebrities at WM 1 was vital to its success.

Also, I think Hogan holding the belt for as long as he did was what really helped prolong Hulkamania. I don't disagree with preferring more title changes in general, but I think that was partly why that run was so successful. Then again we'll never really know one way or the other haha.
Nah. I was a big Hulkamaniac back then but even I got sick of seeing him win all time after a while and was hoping to see him lose it for a little while to Piper or one of the others. I mean, Flair's 16 title reigns were because he didn't hold it for many years at a time. What was his longest title reign anyway?
 

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I know he got his opportunity in 2006 but given how over he got himself during The Alliance Storyline I wouldn't have minded them giving one of the world titles to Rob Van Dam for a month or two in the second half of 2001.
 
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