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Represent
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1,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11711228

The whole damn thing is worth reading but I know some people hate reading so I'll just post the whole article and bold the cool parts. Italic'd the main point, too

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) generates a 'mini-Big Bang'
Dr David Evans: "From conception to design and building this, it's taken about 20 years."
The Large Hadron Collider has successfully created a "mini-Big Bang" by smashing together lead ions instead of protons.

The scientists working at the enormous machine on Franco-Swiss border achieved the unique conditions on 7 November.

The experiment created temperatures a million times hotter than the centre of the Sun.

The LHC is housed in a 27km-long circular tunnel under the French-Swiss border near Geneva.

Up until now, the world's highest-energy particle accelerator - which is run by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Cern) - has been colliding protons, in a bid to uncover mysteries of the Universe's formation.

Proton collisions could help spot the elusive Higgs boson particle and signs of new physical laws, such as a framework called supersymmetry.

But for the next four weeks, scientists at the LHC will concentrate on analysing the data obtained from the lead ion collisions.

This way, they hope to learn more about the plasma the Universe was made of a millionth of a second after the Big Bang, 13.7 billion years ago.

One of the accelerator's experiments, ALICE, has been specifically designed to smash together lead ions, but the ATLAS and Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiments have also switched to the new mode.

'Strong force'

David Evans from the University of Birmingham, UK, is one of the researchers working at ALICE.

He said that the collisions obtained were able to generate the highest temperatures and densities ever produced in an experiment.

"We are thrilled with the achievement," said Dr Evans.

The ALICE experiment has been designed specifically for lead ion collisions

"This process took place in a safe, controlled environment, generating incredibly hot and dense sub-atomic fireballs with temperatures of over ten trillion degrees, a million times hotter than the centre of the Sun.

"At these temperatures even protons and neutrons, which make up the nuclei of atoms, melt resulting in a hot dense soup of quarks and gluons known as a quark-gluon plasma."

Quarks and gluons are sub-atomic particles - some of the building blocks of matter. In the state known as quark-gluon plasma, they are freed of their attraction to one another. This plasma is believed to have existed just after the Big Bang.

He explained that by studying the plasma, physicists hoped to learn more about the so-called strong force - the force that binds the nuclei of atoms together and that is responsible for 98% of their mass.


After the LHC finishes colliding lead ions, it will go back to smashing together protons once again.
Pretty awesome stuff...posted this on another forum and quite a few people couldn't understand how something could be a million times as hot as the core of the sun...my response was the following:

It's just physics guise! It was extremely, extremely small and short lived. Like those shrimp who can snap their claws and create light as well as brief temperatures around that of the sun~

The ALICE experiment and ATLAS and the other two or three are all super-duper technologically advanced. ATLAS alone records hundreds of millions of proton-proton collisions a second and tracks the movement of every particle that results.

Also, the quark-gluon plasma requires such ridiculously high temperatures to exist. That's somewhat why it's considered a mini big bang, because very very early on in the Universe when it was really friggin' hot there was [hypothesized at least, but more likely correct than not] quark-gluon plasma.

Quarks combine to make hadrons, like protons, and to "get the quarks out of the protons" so to say requires a LOT of energy all concentrated on a subatomic dot which = a million times hotter than the core of the sun.

The core of the sun is 15 million degrees C, the nuclear fusion facilities get their little balls of tritium up to 100 million degrees C. [Exerting more pressure than 100 billion atmospheres. Fun fact]

I hope it is plain enough to understand how something so small can be so hot for such a little period of time. The hadron Epoch in which quarks began to combine into hadrons like protons and neutrons out of the quark-gluon plasma was 10^-6 seconds after the big bang, so not very long lolz.
Hope I'm not the only one interested in this kind of stuff :$. Science is awesome, I can't fathom where we'll be in a decade or two or three...lol.
 

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EIRE
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15,862 Posts
I've been following this for awhile now, I'm fascinated by it. Joe Rogan actually got me into it after I heard him talk about it in his podcasts a few times and it got me interested in it. Did some research on it and became fascinated by it. Glad it was successful, I know they were kinda worried that it would create a black hole that they wouldn't be able to control and we could have been in some trouble.
 

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Super Moderator
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19,328 Posts
If I'm being perfectly honest, and I probably am, I was hoping this would have created zombies....



It is fascinating stuff though. I'm glad it worked properly.
 

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GOAT
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4,523 Posts
I remember first hearing about the LHC, and the risks attached, thinking that we were all gonna die :lmao

It's fascinating how they've done it, glad they've been successful.
 

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Represent
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1,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Is it sad that when I first read the title, I pictured a group of midgets dressed as the cast from The Big Bang Theory?
Lmao. YES

And dudes, and Ladeh Croft; the returns from the LHC are far from done. I know years seems like a long timescale, but with the JWST going up in 2013 and the LHC operating for those extra years we will have all of the science we can handle, lol.

The JWST, Hubble's "successor"- is probably going to blow our minds because of what we unexpectedly find out, we already know what its capable of within our current knowledge of the Universe. And it is capable of some coo shit- +1'ing the Hubble a million times over.

As for the LHC, once they ramp up the collisions to 14 TeV and collect data from billions of collisions over years and analyze it, they'll have certainly found the 'God particle' (The Higgs Boson) if it exists [Probably does] and, like the JWST and Hubble, what we don't expect to find may be more mind boggling than fathomable. I'm talking new physics and shit- possible, no doubt. Supersymmetry is particularly fascinating if you want to look it up and have a read on it real quick ;x

Science is cool. Each half decade my mind gets blown...anyway, for those interested, here are three other stories that have come out in just the past week...

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The invisibility cloak is on its way to being real. They've gotten the invisibility "device" down from the size of a building to the size of a tent, which is good. Engineering a 'cloak' is one hell of an engineering prospect not yet realized, but it isn't at all impossible.

3d Holograms like in Star Wars are on their way to being real, too. The best technology sucks atm but its pioneering shit. In 3-4 years they estimate it will be commercially practical. This includes things like surgeons around the world seeing a surgery being performed live, 3D, and being able to help and shit. Lots of other things too I expect, all of which are much more impressive than finding another way to send each other trivial messages xD

A retinal chip in the eye of blind people (Not blind from birth) has successfully turned the incoming light into electrical pulses, allowing them to "see". One man made out 11 different shades of grey, was able to approach people amazingly, and with big enough letters could read his name and noticed that it had been [deliberately] misspelled. They have already removed the chips and are upgrading them, like the other areas of technology this one is exponentially growing. Which is awesome. Medical technology is the best man :$
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Just thought I'd share :D
 

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Damn Fine Cup of Coffee
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12,954 Posts
I find the study of Cosmogony to be very interesting indeed. This video is great for gaining a basic grasp of this expanding and exciting field of science.

 

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Represent
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1,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
To follow up on something from nothing, here is a lecture from one of the most brilliant physicists alive today...


A must watch for everyone in my opinion. Helpful in shutting up fanatics who drool, "SO U BELIEVE SOMETHING CAME FROM NOTHING"
 

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Damn Fine Cup of Coffee
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I only watched the first 15 minutes of it. It's quite long so I'll come back to the rest later but from what I've seen so far, I am quite impressed.
 

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Represent
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1,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
CERN has done it again, capturing for the first time antimatter. (They've "made" it since 2002, but haven't been able to hold onto a single atom. They successfully held onto 38 anti-hydrogen atoms for two tenths of a second each.)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11773791

Keep in mind, if matter-antimatter annihilation could ever be exploited on even a relatively small 'large scale'- many of our problems would be solved. This form of energy production is more energy efficient than not only nuclear fusion, but supernova explosions (which allow stars to outshine their entire galaxy).

Cool stuff (Y)
 
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