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interesting article and i thought id post. Credit: Bleacher report



Bleacher Report said:

"This whole subject got me and my friend to thinking, and like any responsible single males would do in this situation we decided to experiment with this topic. Over the course of several hours we proceeded to casually and randomly ask multiple groups of females their opinions on professional wrestling. We told them we were writing an article on the subject at first, but as the answers became more stereotypical and bizarre it quickly turned into a game that I'm sure every self-respecting single male, who enjoys wrestling, should play at some point. Just trust me on this."

Life is full of funny moments that should always be appreciated. Moments that capture the human spirit and set fire to your soul when the perfect moment and the perfect source of humor collide and explode within you like an atom bomb. A good joke, pets being pets, watching someone trip and fall, watching Sin Cara wrestle, someone falling up a case of stairs, sports bloopers, and everyday, mundane life accidents. These are all moments that when paired with the right company, timing, and sarcastic commentary can ignite laughter in even the most pessimistic person.

Life may be full of funny moments, but it's sure as hell full of moments that aren't funny to you, but definitely hilarious to others around you. These moments are notoriously known as awkward moments.

You know, like that awkward moment when you tell someone you watch and/or write about professional wrestling...

Such was the case this weekend when a newly, begrudgingly single William Gullo told an attractive female at a local "watering hole" that he did just that.

The female in question didn't really have much of a response when I informed her about this particular hobby of mine. Not only did she not seem to care, seem impressed, or even remotely crack a smile, but she came off as a little disgusted, as if I had said something that truly offended her.

Have you ever stared into the eyes of someone and immediately thought "Yep, I'm being judged right now"? That rush of anxiety when you realize the person staring at you might have just lost all their respect for you? It's not like I told her I was a meth dealer whose main office was located behind the playground of an elementary school. It's not like I told her she could stand to lose a couple of pounds, or that I thought her friend looked like she got smacked around with the "ugly stick". Why was this female all of a sudden this disgusted with me?

Has professional wrestling developed such a stigma that even briefly mentioning it in passing now gets you labeled, looked down upon, and condemned in the eyes of females? This had to be an isolated incident, right? There's no way that every female has a repressed grudge against professional wrestling. I know female wrestling writers exist. I know female fans exist. But, they usually only exist within the small sample size of the online wrestling community, or can only be found at actual events.

When this particular female left my table, after I had apparently just murdered any interest she had in me, the first face I saw was the face of my friend who had the biggest smile I have ever seen.

My Friend: I can't believe you told her you write about professional wrestling. You just came right out with that didn't you? For your sake maybe you should just let people get to know you before you tell them about that particular passion. It's hilariously clear that wrestling is definitely frowned upon in the female community. Thanks for the laugh though! That was priceless.

Is wrestling that frowned upon within the female community? Can enjoying professional wrestling really be that bad? In a world full of materialistic, shallow, stereotypical television, music, movies, and social media platforms, is wrestling really that big of a social no-no? Would I have been better off telling her I spend my free time going to the gym, tanning, and doing laundry?

Tell any guy that you watch, read, or write about professional wrestling and you'll most likely get the same responses.Responses that range from "cool" to rehashing old memories of the sport when they watched as kids. Even if they have no memories of watching, more than likely they at least know names like Hogan, Austin, and The Rock. They'll know enough to find common ground on the subject, but even if they were never a fan and lived under a rock, at least judging you is the last thing that will happen.

What makes wrestling so unattractive to females?

It's an age old dilemma in the lives of professional wrestling aficionados. How can I successfully convey to and adapt my significant other to the world of professional wrestling? It took me a good, solid year to finally get my last girlfriend to understand, appreciate, watch, and enjoy the WWE. Now, I have to relive the whole process over with a new person! They weren't kidding when they said breaking up is hard to do.

I began to wonder how many girls at this particular establishment were actually fans of wrestling and how I could go about finding out who was and who wasn't...

This whole subject got me and my friend to thinking, and like any responsible single males would do in this situation, we decided to experiment with this topic. Over the course of several hours we proceeded to casually and randomly ask multiple groups of females their opinions on professional wrestling. We told them we were writing an article on the subject at first, but as the answers became more and more stereotypical, bizarre, and asinine, we quickly turned it into a game that I'm sure every self-respecting single male, who enjoys wrestling, should play at some point. Just trust me on this.

Here's a brief summary of the rules:

How to play: Find a friend/wingman who has past or present knowledge of the WWE product. While approaching females use the following scoring system to mentally remember your score as you try to have a coherent conversation with the respective females. The first "player" to reach ten points wins the round. First to win three rounds wins the game.

Got completely ignored when you started the conversation with "Did you see Raw last week"? 2 points

Use a wrestling catchphrase during your conversation? 1 point per phrase. I almost died when I heard my friend respond with, "Woo, woo, woo, you know it" when asked if he lived in the area.

Recap the latest news, rumors, and wrestling gossip without being asked? 2 points.

Told them all about your days of backyard wrestling, your character, finishing move, and entrance music? 5 points.

This might sound like an exercise in frustration or a game designed to make sure you never date anyone ever again, but the truth is, it actually worked...a little. Alright, it briefly works until you start getting cocky and competitive and forget why you started playing in the first place, but it works.

I actually found actual females who had just the same amount of passion as I did. Whether their brothers, dads, or grandfathers watched it, they understood and appreciated the love I have for professional wrestling. I was 0-4 with four strikeouts at one point, but eventually you'll hit a home run, or at least hit a single.

Listen, let's all be honest with each other. If you're reading this than you're probably an above average to mildly obsessed fan of professional wrestling. It's in your blood. You love it, those around you know you love it, and anyone else who comes into your life will at some point have to deal with your passion. It's only inevitable that wrestling will get in the way of certain plans.

There's four hours of weekly programming, monthly pay-per-views, and God only knows how much extra online content you can sniff out if you really wanted to. You can't hide your love for wrestling forever, so you might as well come straight out with the truth. You're not trying to define yourself with your passion for wrestling, but you certainty shouldn't have to live within a cloud of shame about it either.

Don't let anybody fool you into thinking honesty is the best policy. Sometimes a little discretion or white lie goes a long way, but when it comes to finding love, your best bet is to be an open book. No secrets usually equals no drama. Being a professional wrestling fan comes with a certain stigma for whatever reason so it's completely understandable why one would feel timid about displaying that initially, but it's the right thing to do in this situation.

Fact is, do you really want to date someone who can't even understand or appreciate your passions? Why keep something that is a big part of your life hidden? Express your love for wrestling...to a certain extent.

This brings us to the first rule: Know when you're being the "creepy wrestling guy"...

If this "game" taught me and my friend anything, it's when to slow your roll on your love, knowledge, or anything relating to wrestling. There comes a certain moment when you go from being a likeable male with a passion and hobby, to being the guy who won't stop talking about how Brock Lesnar should have won at Extreme Rules.

This also directly relates to another valuable rule to follow: Show them that it's a passion and hobby...

Everyone has a passion for something and enjoys doing something. Sure, you might run into a person who judges, demeans, and is condescending towards your own likes, but that person is probably going to wind up divorced and lonely at some point, so the joke's on them. Pay no attention to these people.

Eventually you'll find someone who may not like wrestling, but will at least appreciate your passion, enthusiasm, and commitment. These feelings generally translate well into other characteristics that are the foundations for a successful relationship, such as trust, compassion, understanding, and empathy.

The third rule is something I think needs to be said because it can immediately train wreck any conversation based solely on the fact that you might sound like a crazy person.

Rule number three? Don't try to initially sell the whole "wrestling is art" thing right off the bat...

Only a select group of individuals understand that concept as it is. It's only designed for those who have seen the magic in action and know what to watch and listen for. It's like telling someone who just barely passed algebra how easy it is to find the co-sign of tangent squared. I had to painfully watch as my friend tried to explain to a girl how exactly wrestling was like a masterpiece painting. It ended with her confused and uninterested, with him desperately trying to gain her attention back as well as spouting off a few last minute catchphrases to up his point total before she walked away.

What about those stereotypical and bizarre answers we received that originally drove us to create the game? The following is the list of reasons why females don't like wrestling according to females.

1. Men wrestling each other in tights.

2. Steroid use.

3. It's to0 fake and campy.

4. They sell sex.

5. Just don't understand why men like it.

With a list like this it's easy to see why it's so hard to come clean about how much joy you get from watching grown men in tights wrestle, use steroids, and fake fight each other.

There's about a handful more that were more poignant, albeit highly inappropriate, reasons why this certain sample size of females didn't like wrestling. This list, to those who enjoy wrestling, is obviously filled with lapses in logic, a lot of hypocrisy, and uniformed statements of facts, along with a touch of homophobia. We pretty much received the standard answers we thought we would get. Hence the game to make things more interesting, not to mention hilarious.

Is this game dumb? Yes, most definitely. Are me and my friend idiots for trying this? Probably. Does the game somehow work? Absolutely!

As the taxi carried us away from the scene of our epic night—a night filled with meeting lovely girls, drinks and talking profusely about wrestling—we could only talk about one thing. They exist!

Hidden amongst all the perfume, fake hair extensions, makeup, vodka tonics, leggings, furry boots, and short skirts lies an awesome truth. A truth that was only found after we became numb to the blunt sting of rejection, the burn of dirty looks, and the rush of anxiety when we knew we had just lost all of our respect. The truth is that females who share or will at least understand and allow you to express your passion for wrestling exist.

We left that night walking amongst the gods. We bravely threw ourselves into the sea and swam with sharks and not only survived, but now possessed valuable data on how exactly to approach women when it comes to professional wrestling. What had started out as a social experiment, ended up turning into one of the greatest life lessons of all time.

The final and most vital rule for you to remember is simple, but it takes awhile for people to realize just how simple it is. The final rule? Be yourself, hide nothing, and always remember your passions in life. If someone honestly doesn't like you because they hold some weird grudge against wrestling, than you're most likely better off without them.

The game is good. The game is absolute. The game is life.
 

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cena could use some tips :lol
 

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Stopped reading at "Bleacher Report". It sounds like a funny article though. If your life is that consumed in wrestling where finding a wrestling fan partner is that important.... Then well, you're screwed.
 

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At the end of the day, I like what I like and anyone that has something to say about it can fuck off.

It'd be a bit hypocritical for the general population to poke fun at Wrestling fans when they listen to shitty music like Lady Gaga, Madonna, Rihanna, Kesha etc. Or when they watch shitty TV shows like American Idol, Dancing with the Stars, Jersey Shore and any other garbage on TV.

It's all a matter of conformity. People gravitate towards what's popular and move away from what's unpopular. In the late 1990s Wrestling was popular so everybody was happy to prance around with WWE apparel. Now that it's "uncool OMG" people cower into their little closets like sissies.

I swear it seems like everyone are cowards these days. Even grown men are too much of pussies to enjoy what they want. What the hell ever happened to pride, mental-strength and individuality? I live in a world full of mental cuckolds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
At the end of the day, I like what I like and anyone that has something to say about it can fuck off.

It'd be a bit hypocritical for the general population to poke fun at Wrestling fans when they listen to shitty music like Lady Gaga, Madonna, Rihanna, Kesha etc. Or when they watch shitty TV shows like American Idol, Dancing with the Stars, Jersey Shore and any other garbage on TV.

It's all a matter of conformity. People gravitate towards what's popular and move away from what's unpopular. In the late 1990s Wrestling was popular so everybody was happy to prance around with WWE apparel. Now that it's "uncool OMG" people cower into their little closets like sissies.

I swear it seems like everyone are cowards these days. Even grown men are too much of pussies to enjoy what they want. What the hell ever happened to pride, mental-strength and individuality? I live in a world full of mental cuckolds.
so our paths have finally crossed...


Cena's #1 Fan Vs. Cena's #1 Hater WM29 Main event
 

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Totally enjoyed reading that article. Nothing new, but sounded like a lot of fun. I have no qualms with admitting I like wrestling, but I only do so after I get a vibe from the woman if they're even remotely interested in me to begin with. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
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