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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to bring things back to January 4th, 2010 which I'm sure most of you probably watched live or have at least heard of. For those unaware this was Impact Wrestling's (Then known as TNA) biggest show ever and was treated as such. TNA signed Hulk Hogan to a contract, Spike TV gave them a three hour television special to celebrate Hogan's debut and TNA had arguably the best roster in the world at the time (Yes even better than WWE in my opinion). The signing of Hogan and the mainstream attention this would bring was thought to be the final missing piece of the puzzle to jump TNA into the mainstream and make them a viable competitor to WWE much like WCW did when they signed Hulk Hogan.

We are almost ten years from that day, I remember watching that afternoon (Australian time) and I genuinely thought TNA could be a competitor to WWE. If you have never seen the January 4th show it's available on YouTube and amazing to watch again. Imagine watching it live, it was a great experience that I'll never forget.

At that time TNA had signed to their active roster:

AJ Styles, Christopher Daniels, Samoa Joe, Kurt Angle, Kevin Nash, Mick Foley, Nigel McGuiness, Motor City Machine Guns, Bobby Roode, James Storm, Homicide, Magnus (NWA's Nick Aldis), Doug Williams, Jay Lethal, The Dudley Boys, Rhino, Scott Steiner, Bobby Lashley, Abyss, Amazing Red, Consequences Creed (The future Xavier Wood), The Young Bucks, Sting and countless others that were either big stars or would go onto become big stars..

On this show TNA had the following debut to join the above list:

Hulk Hogan, Jeff Hardy (A few months earlier he was the second top face in WWE second only to Cena), Ric Flair (Had been a huge part of WWE's WrestleMania the year prior), Eric Bischoff, Jeff Jarrett and a few others that were really quite bad. Mr. Anderson joined a couple weeks later and at that time was considered one of the top future prospects for WWE with some saying he could become as big of a star as Stone Cold (Seriously...) Rob Van Dam came a couple months later for a stint in TNA where he feuded with Sting. TNA must've hit at least 10 million on all this talent they brought in to try and compete with the WWE.

The January 4th Impact averaged 2.2 million viewers for the 3 hour special which was headlined by AJ Styles Vs Kurt Angle with the debut of Hulk Hogan (That went up against the opening of RAW with the return of Bret Hart) saw three million people watching TNA at once which is a record that will unlikely ever be broken by TNA/Impact.

So my question now with hindsight is where did TNA go wrong? The ratings show that January 4th was the highest rated but ratings were still quite good for the next 3 weeks afterwards. Eventually the ratings began to drop to where they were the previous year meaning something occurred in the January 2010 Impacts that turned people off.

What are your views? Where did TNA go wrong? I'll make another post explaining what I thought personally went wrong but I'm interested in some discussion on this historic night for TNA and wrestling in general.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My views:

- I think TNA put too much emphasis in that January 4th show on the ageing talent from WWE or the legends. Yes, Hogan, Flair, Hardy and everyone else coming to TNA was VERY exciting at the time but why not spread them out? You've got the audience because of Hogan so show to the world what TNA is all about. At this point TNA had that amazing roster I talked about in my opening post and many were recognisable guys. Show off what the X-Division is all about with an appearance from a known guy that works that style or use your own contracted talent, show off your tag team division, show off the young guys and how exciting they were at the time. Instead for the first 20 minutes we got Homicide trying to get out of a cage, failing and then a rushed Jeff Hardy debut.

- Hulk Hogan whilst marketable and one of the most famous wrestlers ever didn't need to be all over a wrestling show in 2010. You can have him appear every week and even give him some time but his role should've been as an authority figure. He should've been there from day one highlighting how awesome the homegrown stars were and his kayfabe reasoning for being there should be to help take these talents to the next level. If Impact ABSOLUTELY had to bring the likes of The Nasty Boys, Orlando Jordan, Sean Morley, Hall, X-Pac etc into TNA why not have Eric Bischoff play the role of the guy who feels that Impact needs these ageing stars whilst Hogan gives the nod to the youth?

- A major issue I had was Flair debuts and is interested in finding this young kid AJ Styles that everyone is talking about (So far so good) but upon finding AJ we have Flair convince AJ to become a clone of himself right down to the robes and all. Why couldn't AJ just be a heel champion with Flair as his manager? On another note why did Hogan have to debut Abyss and turn him into a Hogan clone? Why couldn't Hogan just stand behind "The Monster" Abyss? I found that as a massive turn off and I'm sure many long term Impact fans did also.

- As we moved on the stories were more and more focused around these ageing stars. An nWo return could've been a fine midcard angle but we had middle aged Hall and Nash beating top TNA stars for the belts, we saw Hogan and Flair both really damage 2 TNA homegrown stars in Abyss and AJ, we saw random gimmick matches and hotshot booking. None of that can work long term.
 

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Too much use of old guys and inconsistent booking that was all over the place. I actually looked back at some of their shows and they weren't bad at all and had great ring setups with hot crowds. It just never felt like they had any long term plan that they would stick with for anybody.

It really sucked what happened with Desmond Wolfe. That guy was on his way to becoming a star. Once Hogan came in he was treated like a jobber.
 

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Too much use of old guys and inconsistent booking that was all over the place. I actually looked back at some of their shows and they weren't bad at all and had great ring setups with hot crowds. It just never felt like they had any long term plan that they would stick with for anybody.

It really sucked what happened with Desmond Wolfe. That guy was on his way to becoming a star. Once Hogan came in he was treated like a jobber.
Agreed they screwed up with Nigel, he was so good in ROH. I feel that they screwed up both Nigel and Elijah Burke big time, those two guys should have been in the main event title scene being groomed as the next generation of stars to get the belt.
 

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  • That evening in hindsight only needed Hogan, Flair and Jeff Hardy. The rest of the focus should have been on the TNA roster. And they should have gone on the road then, not three years later. 2005-09 in perceived to be a stronger period for TNA than 2011-13.
  • Raw that evening put on a mediocre show. Bret Hart's return is really the only highlight of that episode. That pretty much summed up how WWE felt about TNA, and they turned out to be right. And haven’t put much effort in their shows since, aside from the odd episode or PPV.
  • In the aftermath of that show, TNA should not have pushed Austin Aries over James Storm. They partially got it right by pushing Bobby Roode, and it would have been best if they pushed all three. But if they had to choose between Storm and Aries , they should have stuck with the larger wrestler and the love of beer by the general audience instead of the smaller wrestler and the love of workrate by smarks. Pushing Austin Aries was a mistake I feel.
  • TNA did not have the advantages that exist now for AEW, regardless if was social media (including the knowledge of how to use social media), the popularity of indy/women's/puroresu/lucha, the right tv channel (TNT would have been far better than Spike), or the enmity that WWE have developed among the fanbase that had only gotten worse over the last decade.
  • Plus they Just. Wouldn't. Advertise.Themselves!!!
  • January 4 is now Wrestle Kingdom day and AEW is around and doing a lot of things that TNA failed to do or live up to, and in some ways better than TNA. So this day, while important for the wrestling environment we have now, doesn't really matter all that much anymore.
 

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Damn it's 10 years to the day. Where does time fly? What does the next 10 years have in store I wonder. I predict that AEW will make it big whilst WWE probably get dropped of tv deals in the US. Impact and MLW will continue at indy level before they die off.
 

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Damn it's 10 years to the day. Where does time fly? What does the next 10 years have in store I wonder. I predict that AEW will make it big whilst WWE probably get dropped of tv deals in the US. Impact and MLW will continue at indy level before they die off.
You'll probably be wrong with all your predictions then.
Besides, IMPACT is not indy.
 

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The signings wre suppose to be for creative ideas and instead they turned out to be on air talent which screwed everything up.
 

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I wanted to bring things back to January 4th, 2010 which I'm sure most of you probably watched live or have at least heard of. For those unaware this was Impact Wrestling's (Then known as TNA) biggest show ever and was treated as such. TNA signed Hulk Hogan to a contract, Spike TV gave them a three hour television special to celebrate Hogan's debut and TNA had arguably the best roster in the world at the time (Yes even better than WWE in my opinion). The signing of Hogan and the mainstream attention this would bring was thought to be the final missing piece of the puzzle to jump TNA into the mainstream and make them a viable competitor to WWE much like WCW did when they signed Hulk Hogan.

We are almost ten years from that day, I remember watching that afternoon (Australian time) and I genuinely thought TNA could be a competitor to WWE. If you have never seen the January 4th show it's available on YouTube and amazing to watch again. Imagine watching it live, it was a great experience that I'll never forget.

At that time TNA had signed to their active roster:

AJ Styles, Christopher Daniels, Samoa Joe, Kurt Angle, Kevin Nash, Mick Foley, Nigel McGuiness, Motor City Machine Guns, Bobby Roode, James Storm, Homicide, Magnus (NWA's Nick Aldis), Doug Williams, Jay Lethal, The Dudley Boys, Rhino, Scott Steiner, Bobby Lashley, Abyss, Amazing Red, Consequences Creed (The future Xavier Wood), The Young Bucks, Sting and countless others that were either big stars or would go onto become big stars..

On this show TNA had the following debut to join the above list:

Hulk Hogan, Jeff Hardy (A few months earlier he was the second top face in WWE second only to Cena), Ric Flair (Had been a huge part of WWE's WrestleMania the year prior), Eric Bischoff, Jeff Jarrett and a few others that were really quite bad. Mr. Anderson joined a couple weeks later and at that time was considered one of the top future prospects for WWE with some saying he could become as big of a star as Stone Cold (Seriously...) Rob Van Dam came a couple months later for a stint in TNA where he feuded with Sting. TNA must've hit at least 10 million on all this talent they brought in to try and compete with the WWE.

The January 4th Impact averaged 2.2 million viewers for the 3 hour special which was headlined by AJ Styles Vs Kurt Angle with the debut of Hulk Hogan (That went up against the opening of RAW with the return of Bret Hart) saw three million people watching TNA at once which is a record that will unlikely ever be broken by TNA/Impact.

So my question now with hindsight is where did TNA go wrong? The ratings show that January 4th was the highest rated but ratings were still quite good for the next 3 weeks afterwards. Eventually the ratings began to drop to where they were the previous year meaning something occurred in the January 2010 Impacts that turned people off.

What are your views? Where did TNA go wrong? I'll make another post explaining what I thought personally went wrong but I'm interested in some discussion on this historic night for TNA and wrestling in general.
Hogan and Bischoff killed everything that made TNA unique, turned Jeff Hardy heel, and put all the emphasis on the main eventers while not giving a shit about anyone else.
 

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A bit like WCW, took too long elevate their homegrown stars and had too much emphasis on older generation stars.
 

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To me the dumbest thing was, that Sting had just passed the torch to AJ at BFG, then all of a sudden he needed Flairs help & turned heel.

That and they got rid of the 6-sided ring, thats what made TNA different
 
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