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The following was written by Dave Scherer of 1wrestling.com, and I thought it was a great idea. More to come in the future:

"I often get mail from people asking me what I would do to turn things around if I was in charge of WWE creative. Generally, I don't spend a lot of time fantasy booking because to me it's both frustrating and a total waste of time. No matter how good the ideas are that I could come up with, WWE would never use them so to me, it's just an exercise in futility to even go down that road. Today however, I will venture out and wrap up on a silver platter an idea that could turn around both WWE's recent downturn in business as well as make the brand extension a success, all in one easy step. I also want to say that I realize that egos at WWE will prevent this from ever happening, for a number of reasons, but I won't let that stop me. If they did it, it would be money in the bank.

First let me say that my idea is hardly revolutionary. To be honest, part of the reason to do it is because it has worked so well in the past. In this case however, given that WWE has shown that they are serious about establishing the brand extension, my idea makes even more sense to do, especially now when they have two rosters full of talent that not only are not over, but haven't even been booked to get over. If there was ever a time to wipe the slate clean and start over with a fresh idea, this is it.

What I proposes is that WWE goes all the way with the extension and sets up two true separate companies, both of which they will obviously own. Through an intricate series of events that, in the tradition of how great shoot angles of the past uses real life events to lay the groundwork for the story, uses legitimate incidents to break Raw away from the grasp of WWE and establishes a "new company" that will be run by two people who have the legitimate background to make claim to the ownership.

History has shown that, with the exception of the botched WCW-ECW angle in 2001, invasion angles have always drawn big money. Even in 2001, adding ECW to the mix spurred the July PPV that year to a big buyrate. The balance of power in the US business was turned in the mid 1990s by that very concept when the nWo took over WCW. The fact is, people get behind that storyline and in a market with no competition, what is needed more than anything is "a choice" for the consumers. If they play this idea correctly, they could give the appearance of that choice being a reality.

It all begins on Raw one night. The way you do it is very subtle, over the course of a few weeks or maybe even a month. It starts on an episode where Jim Ross and Jerry Lawler open the show by saying that "Eric Bischoff is not at Raw tonight". Throughout the first hour of the show, they speculate as to why Bischoff is not there. Steve Austin breaks character in the back with Vince McMahon and both men say that they have no idea where Bischoff is. Just then, a courier delivers them a letter. Bischoff informs them in the package that he is in court, and later that night they will get the explanation as to where exactly he is. That is all the letter says. Austin and Vince are perplexed. Vince says he will call Linda in Connecticut and ask what legal business the company has that Bischoff could possibly be attending to.

For the next half hour, Ross and Lawler wonder what is going on and heavily play up that it's never a good thing when someone goes to court and that no good can come from that. At 10:30, a video feed bursts into the TitanTron. From "earlier that day", Eric Bischoff is shown walking up the steps and into a Federal court building in New York City. The clip lasts maybe 30 seconds. Then, because it has already been announced, the night's main event takes place until about 10:50, all while Ross and Lawler wonder what Bischoff was doing. At that point, Austin comes out to the ring and calls out Vince to tell the people what is going on. Vince comes out to the ring, totally out of character (no Rogers strut, etc.) and says that he and Linda have called everyone in the company and they have no idea why Bischoff would be representing them in court. He is totally confused and doesn't know what is going on.

Just then, there is another feed on the TitanTron and we are shown Bischoff walking out of the court house, smiling from ear to ear. He takes a few steps and then stops, turns and looks back. Out of the courthouse comes, Paul Heyman, also smiling from ear to ear. He and Bischoff shake hands and embrace, a true sign of the apocalypse for Vince. A graphic goes up on the video feed that says, "We will see you next week Vince." The show ends with Vince stunned.

Raw starts the next week in normal fashion. As the show begins, Bischoff and Heyman come through the crowd, with a police escort and a guy in a suit, into the ring. Vince and Austin come storming out and the guy in the suit hands Vince a legal document. As Vince is reading it, Bischoff explains that after over two years, he has gone to court to charge McMahon and WWE with monopolistic practices in the quashing Fusient Media Ventures' attempt to buy WCW in 2001. He accused McMahon of using connections inside of AOL Time Warner to drop Fusient's deal so that WWE could buy WCW and destroy it. He lays out true specific points from when Fusient, which he refers to as "my company", lost out in the WCW bidding and tells McMahon that the judge said he had a strong case and expedited his trial date to two weeks or a month from now, depending on how long you want to go with this part of the angle.

Heyman then takes the mic and explains to the crowd that while he had a valid television deal with Viacom and TNN, McMahon undermined him by jumping from USA and taking his TV spot, effectively putting his company out of business. He points out that while he was in the right at the time and WWE was obviously wrong, he was in a poor cash position, which McMahon knew and took advantage of through his intimate knowledge of ECW finances. Heyman said that he didn't have the resources to go to court and sue McMahon for stealing his TV deal because he put everything he had left into saving his company, which ultimately failed.

He then says to Vince directly, "Remember me? I was the guy you were so nice to as my company, ECW, was going down the tubes. I was the guy you promised a job and future to, and who you advised to close down and come work for you and get a fresh start. I am also the guy who, after you stole my company out of bankruptcy court, was sent home to rot when you didn't need me for anything anymore. I didn't see I was being played at the time, but I do now, and so does the judge in New York. I too have an expedited hearing and like Bischoff, am suing you for 500 million dollars. Have a nice night and see you in court."

Bischoff and Heyman leave back through the crowd. Vince reads from the legal document that the case is set to go to trial, on a Wednesday (not Tuesday because that is too contrived) in two weeks to a month, again depending on what they decide for a timeline. Vince is stunned, and scared. Later in the show, he is on a phone call from Linda, extremely stressed, out saying, "I know damn well this could cost us everything. You don't have to tell me that. You have to tell me how we can get out of this."

Over the next two weeks/month of TV, the McMahons are shown going nuts and the company is in disarray. The McMahons lawyers tell them that they have done everything that they are accused of doing and are advised to set up a meeting and settle because if it goes to court, they are doomed. They conference call Bischoff and Heyman and Heyman says, "Vince, you have always loved to live your life in front of the cameras, so we won't stop now. We will have this discussion on Raw next week." Of course, that Raw is two days before the trial.

That Monday on Raw, The McMahons, Bischoff and Heyman, along with their lawyers, meet in that very ring. The McMahons offer a relatively small settlement. Heyman and Bischoff counter that they will not budge from their combined one billion dollar demand.....unless they could have what they wanted all along, a wrestling company with stars and a TV slot. They are not greedy. They don't want to push Vince out of the business they way that he did to them, they just want what should be theirs and Vince's greed and gluttony will be what pays for it.

Bischoff and Heyman say that in order to drop their suits, they want the Raw and Heat television slots and all of the talent from their former respective companies (which would make it easier to balance the roster for a true split, for example by saying the Dudleys are ECW guys). The McMahons have until the end of the show to accept or refuse this settlement. If they refuse, see you in court on Wednesday.

After much angst through out the show, at 11:06, The McMahons finally agree to the demand, realizing that half a company is better than losing everything. The show goes off the air with Bischoff and Heyman in the ring, smiling. Bischoff says, "Fans, tune in next week for the first edition of...." Heyman jumps in and screams, "WECW MONDAY NIGHT RAW!!!""

Well, that's the first part of the storyline, there will be more to come when Dave gets to writing it.


What do you guys think?

I think it's a good idea, since it's true that invasion style angles draw higher ratings, and it's also a nice way to make up for the WCW/ECW Invasion angle, which many say was bad.

Plus invasion angles do seem more like shoots instead of normal storylines.

Input your thoughts.
 

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WOW yur right but another thing they can do is pry triple H's lips of Vinces ASS. And to wake vince out of the dream he's in that the wwe is totally fine and they r in no financial trouble and they r just as popular now as they were in '98-00' (All the great ECW-WCW talent they got in '01 has either been laid off or shoved down the Card

P.s Just ask Tommy Dreamer the wwe has made a mochary of him.
 
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