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Not to try to steal thunder from the General Discussion thread but I thought that this would be an appropriate place to talk about this particular decade. This will also be a place for me to give thoughts for the project that I'm doing.

It's also interesting how not even a year after the decade has ended, we are starting to see what kinds of movements in style that have been forming. There was this style of realism that had really taken hold in Europe, Latin America and in the independent cinema of the U.S. Probably because it was a response to the highly political times that we live in, but it really set itself apart from the ever increasing stylized cinema of Hollywood. Eastern European filmmakers had a lot to say this decade and produced many great films.

We also saw the rise in popularity of documentaries, in part thanks to Michael Moore, for regular film watchers. It is also a fitting genre for such a political decade. But there were also great non-political documentaries that were released as well such as Grizzly Man and Man on Wire. There will be plenty of these films that will make my ballot.
 

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This is a good topic that should have its own thread. I'm not sure I had ever watched a documentary before the 00s save The Thin Blue Line. Unless History Channel stuff counts as documentaries of course. There just wasn't as much exposure for them as there is now, thanks to this Information Age which pretty much dawned in the late 90s, but didn't pick up steam until the 00s. It's a great time to be alive.

I still love Bowling for Columbine even though I believe in the Second Amendment. I also loved the European and Latin American films that were produced last decade; there are still quite a few I need to see. There is no question these filmmakers wanted to make films that were everything mainstream American cinema wasn't. Hollywood does suck hard for the most part.

Off the top of my head I was exposed to the magnificent work of Guillermo Del Toro, who is definitely one of my favorite filmmakers. I'll watch anything this man does. I think he captures Magical Realism on film better than anyone I've ever seen.
 

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Documentaries rising in popularity, realism you already spoke of, and big name stars seemingly more replaced by franchises as the box office draw were notable trends of the decade as well as computer animation dominating at the box office and generally seen as being more intelligent in terms of writing than previous popular animated films.

Documentaries rise in popularity is the one that stands out most to me, Bowling For Columbine and Super Size Me are recognizable names people not heavily into film know about and may have seen and the hype around Fahrenheit 9/11 was unlike anything I've ever seen for a documentary.
 

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Probably one of the worst decades ever for film, well especially mainstream, like 90% of that is garbage. At least there are some true directors out there still dropping gems, but most of them are from a different era so it's expected, not many great new young filmmakers are breaking through anymore, because the industry has pretty much become a joke, and unless you know someone in it, chances are you ain't making it.

I wouldn't really call this decade the rise of the documentary either, out of the ten best, only maybe one would come out of this decade....that probably being Capturing the Friendmans, Grizzly Man might slide into the top 10 also actually.
 

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Yeah and he's got that Mississippi Mudflap, as you so perfectly put it, all kickin in too.

I need to see King of Kong again.
He's one of a kind, that's for sure.

I'd be heartbroken if he got rid of the Mississippi Mudflap.


I can watch that documentary over and over again.



-- My favorite documentary of all time might well be Standing in the Shadows of Motown. It's a 2002 documentary if I'm not mistaken. Maybe 2003.

It's about the Funk Brothers. A group of musicians who played on a lot of Motown hits. I think they have played on more hits than anyone in history... and so few people even know who they are.

Great stuff. Ya'll need to check it out if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Watched Grizzly Man last night and that goes on my list as best documentary that I've seen this decade, so far. It's weird, Werner Herzog has disappointed me with one film, My Son, My Son What Have Ye Done? but that in itself wasn't a terrible film, just disjointed and boring. Grizzly Man really moved me and I think it'll rank really high on my ballot.
 

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New Blood have you seen the Herzog film Even Dwarfs started small - that is seriously the weirdest shit I've ever seen. I don't even know how to go about rating it - it's just extremely odd.
 

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No I haven't but I want to.

It's the films of Werner Herzog, Andrei Tarkovsky, Federico Fellini, Jean Luc Godard, David Lynch, Luis Bunuel and Alejandro Jodorowsky that made me give up the rating system. Those are films that you can't quantify with a number. Since film is art (I don't care what people say -- the ones who say that film is only for entertainment), it should confront and destroy conventions and these filmmakers do it.

The film essays that I write are not reviews of whether the film is good or bad but I take a look at its stylistic and technical influences relating to its genre, culture or time period. I actually find that route is far more rewarding when looking at a film then simply giving it ***** or thumbs up or thumbs down. I was able to cement Mulholland Drive, Wild Bunch and Apocalypse Now in my all time favorites after having to write a critique (as opposed to a film review) or a history piece as I had to watch them multiple times, take notes and really think about them.

Wow, talk about a tangent that went off the wall. But anyway, I don't use rating systems. LOL.
 

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No I haven't but I want to.

It's the films of Werner Herzog, Andrei Tarkovsky, Federico Fellini, Jean Luc Godard, David Lynch, Luis Bunuel and Alejandro Jodorowsky that made me give up the rating system. Those are films that you can't quantify with a number. Since film is art (I don't care what people say -- the ones who say that film is only for entertainment), it should confront and destroy conventions and these filmmakers do it.

The film essays that I write are not reviews of whether the film is good or bad but I take a look at its stylistic and technical influences relating to its genre, culture or time period. I actually find that route is far more rewarding when looking at a film then simply giving it ***** or thumbs up or thumbs down. I was able to cement Mulholland Drive, Wild Bunch and Apocalypse Now in my all time favorites after having to write a critique (as opposed to a film review) or a history piece as I had to watch them multiple times, take notes and really think about them.

Wow, talk about a tangent that went off the wall. But anyway, I don't use rating systems. LOL.
Certain aspects of this I agree with but I still rate films because a lot of them ultimately amount to enjoyment to me even when they're challenging/thought provoking.

Even though I liked them quite a bit it's hard for me to say The Town, Shutter Island, or Inception is "beyond a rating", they just weren't those type of films that feel worthy of that level of dissection to me. Although they did provoke analysis beyond the basic they still amounted to just great entertainment to me, whereas 2001, Apocalypse Now, and even the Social Network are in that "beyond a rating" category in that I consider them challenging, socially relevant art worthy of dissection and repeated viewings.
 

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Documentary films were awesome in the ;ast decade, my favourite being Touching the Void.
I have had Brown Girl in The Ring in my head since I watched this, the irony. A very well made documentary this one though man.
 
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