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Best current-gen fighting game for newcomers?

  • Street Fighter 5

    Votes: 1 11.1%
  • Mortal Kombat 11

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Tekken 7

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 55.6%

  • Total voters
    9
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I don't know why but I've had a real hankering for some fighting games lately. Maybe I'm just burnt out on big narrative open world games and want a more focused purer experience.

Dunno the reason. Just know I have a mighty need to play fighting games.

Problem is, I'm largely shit-tastic at them. Literally, this is my sum total experience with fighting games:

- Played Street Fighter II way back as a wee nipper, insisted on only playing as Vega, was terrible at Vega, cried when my brother kept beating me.
- Played original Mortal Kombat and managed to reach, but never defeat, Shan Tsung.
- Bought Street Fighter IV on impulse, couldn't get to grips with the controls, gave up and sold it in like 3 days later.
- Bought Mortal Kombat X, same problem.

That's it.

I've had a fondness for the genre since childhood but whenever I try and play one I can sit there and learn all the commands and combos but as soon as I get to an actual fight my brain just reverts to panicked button-mashing and reckless jump attacks.

But I've got hold of Street Fighter V and Mortal Kombat 11 and have been pissing about with them here and there to see if I can get my head around them this time.

Thing is obviously I know fuck all about fighting games so I figured I'd ask anyone here who does know about them what example of the genre on current gen consoles is kind of best in terms of integrating and training idiotic noobs.
 

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NBA
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Try Tekken 7. It's the most stale out of all the franchises you've listed, but it's also the most casual friendly by far, which is both good, since one can have a good time without having any previous exp with the game, and bad, since player can abuse certain sucker patterns and easy to spam combos.
 

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I'm gonna go with two routes/options you could go here tbh.

Option 1: Easy to play classic franchises - Tekken 7 or Soul Calibur VI. Both have super simple controls and are very noob friendly, exactly how they were years ago.

Option 2: Very easy to play but way more cinematic anime fighters: Naruto Ultimate Ninja Storm 4: Road to Boruto - this one has insanely cinematic fighting, is super easy to play and do massive moves with and looks stunning. Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 - actually Dragon Ball Fighterz is the superior fighting game but requires a lot more skill to play well. Xenoverse is similar to Naruto in that it has simple special move mechanics and is a 3d fighter with a much bigger stage to fight in and ridiculous powerful moves.
 
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Asuka
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Mortal Kombat for me is easily the most accessible. If you put any time into X, you shouldn't have been that bad at it, and same goes for 11. I'm a pretty bad player and I've improved dramatically. You have to commit to it, though. You can't do 10 minutes a day and get better at it. You have to go into practice mode, learn about which attacks have good and bad frame data, and learn about which characters are bad matchups for other characters. If I can get to a point where I'm doing pretty well online, literally anybody can do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mortal Kombat for me is easily the most accessible. If you put any time into X, you shouldn't have been that bad at it, and same goes for 11. I'm a pretty bad player and I've improved dramatically. You have to commit to it, though. You can't do 10 minutes a day and get better at it. You have to go into practice mode, learn about which attacks have good and bad frame data, and learn about which characters are bad matchups for other characters. If I can get to a point where I'm doing pretty well online, literally anybody can do it.
For what it's worth Mortal Kombat is always the series I feel the most weird fondness for in terms of fighting games, and I probably did give up on MKX way too fast after I got initially frustrated with it.

My problem with Mortal Kombat in terms of me playing it is that I can sit there in practise mode rattling off combos and special moves and even managing to string them together pretty damn well, but as soon as an actual fight starts my brain hits the panic button and all the carefully-practised button coordination goes out the fucking window.

That and I somehow manage to be apocalyptically shit at blocking consistently which is kind of a fundamental skill.

And then I see videos online of people stringing together god-tier ludicrous combos and special moves and I just get disheartened that I'm never gonna be able to pull off half of that shit.
 

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Regarding Street Fighter V (and the Street Fighter franchise in general) what you could do is:


-Start with the more accessible yet effective characters such as Ryu and Ken (and maybe Akuma though he is arguably a tad advanced compared to the other two.)


-Practice. A lot. With patience and disciplined focus.


-After you have gained some confidence in handling Ryu/Ken hit the Arcade/Story modes and then work from there. Set up a goal, come out victorious from the mentioned modes and then go on and practice with Vega. (who although I do not main is very fun to play as in Street Fighter V.)


-Last but probably the most important note: Get out of your own way. Reasonable self-criticism causes healthy growth which is fantastic but unreasonable self-criticism, combined with unchecked overthinking during very heated and active battles during the rounds, will only hamper you from growing as a player.
 

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Try Dragonball Fighter Z. It's noob friendly with a lot of depth and unlike the others mentioned people you play won't have 20 years of experience on the game's engine.
I second this! Been trying to get in at least an hour a day so I'm not rusty when janemba is released.

While there are minor differences throughout the roster, there are universal combo paths for about 90% of the cast that you can do major damage with. There are auto combo options that you add to once you have your go to team.

It's still pretty active as well. My internet sucks and I can still find player matches at very high connection rate.

The game runs on the guilty gear engine so it's absolutely gorgeous! 2d playstayle with 3d models. It really looks like you're playing the show.

And if you're an anime fan you can really appreciate all the love and effort that went into the game. From the banter some of the characters have with one another before and after fights. To the dramatic finishes that recreate some awesome moments from the show. (Yamcha getting yamcha'd!!!)
 

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For what it's worth Mortal Kombat is always the series I feel the most weird fondness for in terms of fighting games, and I probably did give up on MKX way too fast after I got initially frustrated with it.

My problem with Mortal Kombat in terms of me playing it is that I can sit there in practise mode rattling off combos and special moves and even managing to string them together pretty damn well, but as soon as an actual fight starts my brain hits the panic button and all the carefully-practised button coordination goes out the fucking window.

That and I somehow manage to be apocalyptically shit at blocking consistently which is kind of a fundamental skill.

And then I see videos online of people stringing together god-tier ludicrous combos and special moves and I just get disheartened that I'm never gonna be able to pull off half of that shit.

I suffer from this myself. One thing that helped me is trying to break the habbit of fishing for combos and sometimes being ok with just landing a few hits. If one of those hits results in a knockdown, that's when you go for the big damage off your opponent's wake up. All the pressure is on them in that situation. Also if it's a game with few wake up options or if your opponent is on auto pilot, you can really wreck someone for waking up wrong .

If you go for something that doesn't work. Like it gets blocked or just doesn't come out, don't keep trying to do it over and over again. You thought to do it because you saw the opening. If that move or combo fails, you're not doing it again because that opening is there, you're doing it again because it failed and you had your mind set on doing it.

The real skill gap in players is the players that have a set game plan, and the players who are able to adjust their game plan.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Regarding Street Fighter V (and the Street Fighter franchise in general) what you could do is:


-Start with the more accessible yet effective characters such as Ryu and Ken (and maybe Akuma though he is arguably a tad advanced compared to the other two.)


-Practice. A lot. With patience and disciplined focus.


-After you have gained some confidence in handling Ryu/Ken hit the Arcade/Story modes and then work from there. Set up a goal, come out victorious from the mentioned modes and then go on and practice with Vega. (who although I do not main is very fun to play as in Street Fighter V.)


-Last but probably the most important note: Get out of your own way. Reasonable self-criticism causes healthy growth which is fantastic but unreasonable self-criticism, combined with unchecked overthinking during very heated and active battles during the rounds, will only hamper you from growing as a player.
I'm probably committing fighting game blasphemy here but my main problem thus far with Street Fighter V is that the controls just seem way too weird and imprecise.

Like, you've gotta drag the control stick in an exact quarter-circle then press a button to do this move, but if you don't do it exactly right and instead move it in a more diagonal motion you'll do a totally different move if you do anything at all, but if you don't move the control stick enough you'll just a crouching kick and if you do it too much you'll just jump forward right into an enemy attack because fuck you.

Maybe this is why any footage I see of Street Fighter tournaments everyone's using custom arcade-style game pads, because on standard controllers that shit's fucking ludicrusly pissy with you about what it registers as the correct fucking input.
 

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Pretty much all fighting games can be noob friendly, yet require a deeper understanding of the mechanics for the competitive arena. If you play any given fighter at your skill level, chances are you'll develope an understanding for the basics in no time at all. My little 6 year old sister knew how to play Ken within the first hour, but she would've gotten smoked online.


There ARE franchises that take far more time to master and even understand the basics, like Guilty Gear and Samurai Shodown, but even then you can still button mash your way against someone of similar skill.
 
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