Wrestling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
754 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
NOTE: (I'm also against official ratings boards for movies and music for the same reasons I'm about to argue against the ESRB. I'm just focusing on the ESRB because I figured it's the most relevant to me personally.)


The ESRB is completely stupid and unnecessary. There's absolutely no reason what so ever to have an official ratings board for video games. Why should there be an official ratings board telling us what is or isn't appropriate for our children, when we haven't even agreed to the standards that it's using to judge games?

During the development of Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Masahiro Sakurai responded on the official Smash Bros. website to a fan question asking what types of weapons Snake would be using in the game. Sakurai said that Snake would not use any guns or knives, because he wanted to make sure the game didn't get higher than a T rating. In the final game, Snake ended up using rocket launchers and hand grenades.

Now call me crazy, but I'm pretty sure that rocket launchers and hand grenades are more violent than guns and knives. Not only that, but there are plenty of characters in Smash Bros. who fight with swords. Aren't swords just bigger knives?! Why is it that it's okay to shoot Pikachu with an exploding missile, but if you shoot him with a bullet you've gone too far? Why is it that you can smack Princess Peach in the face with a sword, but if you use a knife you've crossed the line? And furthermore, why should the ESRB have the authority to draw this completely arbitrary line for what is or isn't appropriate?

What if I don't agree with those standards? What if I'm buying a game for my 11 year old sister and I don't think that games with knives are less appropriate for her than games with swords? But, when I go to look at a game in a store, all I see is the big 'M' rating warning me that the game I'm looking at is inappropriate for my sister to play. I have no idea that the reason they consider it inappropriate is because it has knives instead of swords. So now a developer and a store has lost a sale because I've been deceived into thinking a game that I would normally buy for my sister is inappropriate for her to play.

Also, what about the parents who think that swords are too violent? If there are people who think that games with knives are inappropriate for children under 17, then surely there must also be people who think the same thing about games with swords. What about the people who don't want their children playing games with swords, but who buy games that have swords for their children because the ESRB told them the games were appropriate for children? Aren't those people being deceived? Is it fair that they're being mislead into allowing their children to play games that have content that they don't want their children exposed to?

The ESRB basically came into existence due to the constant whining of people like Jack Thompson. Why should we rely on a ratings board that came into existence to please people like Jack Thompson, as if Jack Thompson in anyway represents the mainstream of society?

You're probably wondering how people would know which games were appropriate for their children without a rating system. It's simple, there would still be a rating system. It's just that instead of having an official rating system, games would be rated by websites and magazines like Destructoid and EGM. Reviewers would rate a game's appropriate age group as part of their review of the game. Over time, people would learn which ratings they trusted the most and those would be the ones they'd base their purchasing decisions on.

Eventually certain rating systems would become so popular that they'd end up being the unofficial 'official' rating systems. If people decide that Ted's Rating System is the most fair and accurate, then developers will start putting things like "Ted says this game's appropriate for all ages" on the front of the box. Developers would still have to cater to the rules of ratings boards in order to get the specific ratings that they wanted for certain games, but the ratings boards that they'd be catering to would be the ones that the consumers have decided are the best, instead of the one that's being shoved down our throats now.
 
Joined
·
375 Posts
Puggle here.

PEER COUNSELING

This Friday, I will be holding a Peer Counseling session. It will be of no cost to anyone who chooses to come, just an opportunity to talk about your feelings and "chillax" as the kids say.

There will be cookies and fruit punch. Don't miss out, bro!

The session will be held at 108 Plum Street and starts 7:00 pm.

Don't be late!

Puggle
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,666 Posts
I can't be bothered to read the whole thing but I'll just say that little kids shouldn't be able to play 18 rated games.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Answer to OP debacle: There's no blood.

Grandma will always buy you Call Of Duty next time, don't worry!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
754 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Rocket launchers, hand grenades, and swords aren't as easy to obtain as (hand)guns and knives. Knives are probably the worst as every home has knives in them.
What does obtainability have to do with anything? Playing a game doesn't require you to have items featured in the game in real life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
It's for parents who don't play video games. How would they know what is in the video game if they don't see the rating for it. Maybe a parent doesn't want their child to see some of the stuff in the game.
 

·
I must away and tend to my ravens
Joined
·
11,236 Posts
It's for parents who don't play video games. How would they know what is in the video game if they don't see the rating for it. Maybe a parent doesn't want their child to see some of the stuff in the game.
Except that parents are even clueless about that. I used to work for GameStation and constantly had parents buying 18 rated games for their young kids. Even if I tried to tell them they didn't get it/give a shit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
Except that parents are even clueless about that. I used to work for GameStation and constantly had parents buying 18 rated games for their young kids. Even if I tried to tell them they didn't get it/give a shit.
Well maybe it's for a selected few then. It's just their to benefit people, maybe people don't like seeing gore in games and just want the rated T ones, who knows.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,721 Posts
Well maybe it's for a selected few then. It's just their to benefit people, maybe people don't like seeing gore in games and just want the rated T ones, who knows.
Yeah, the main difference between a m rated game and a t rated game is if there's gore involved.that's why a game like Medal of honor will be rated T, while Modern Warfsare will be rated M.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
754 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Except that parents are even clueless about that. I used to work for GameStation and constantly had parents buying 18 rated games for their young kids. Even if I tried to tell them they didn't get it/give a shit.
Maybe not everyone in the world agrees that games that the ESRB gives an M rating to are inappropriate for children under 17. That's why there should be multiple ratings systems, so that people can choose which one they trust the most, since 'appropriate' and 'inappropriate' are subjective terms.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,072 Posts
It actually is pretty pointless considering the amount of lazy parents who complain about the violent videogames they themselves buy for their kids. It's even more pointless when you think about just how many people actually fucking listen to those stupid genetic shit stains and their spawn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
Most developers (including Cliffy B.) support ESRB and see its use plus its not like there is a magic block that stops people who are not of the proper age from playing the game. Sure an 11 year old can't buy the game on their own but if a responsable adult buys it its fine.

The whole no guns for Snake thing was probably just ass covering. I doubt that guns would have gave the game an M rating but they were making sure that they didn't have any really parent unfriendly content. The game was already rated T and they didn't want to push it.

Plus how the hell would you beat guns? The fire faster than your eyes can detect and watching Snake gun down Mario or Kirby would be ridiculously stupid
 

·
DAVID OTUNGA's Personal Assistant
Joined
·
9,748 Posts
it's pointless because people don't pay attention to it, but it's NOT pointless for the reasons the OP stated. it could be very effective and helpful if most people weren't idiots.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
754 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
stevefox1200
Most developers (including Cliffy B.) support ESRB and see its use plus
That's fine. I'm not saying that the ESRB can't exist at all. I'm saying that it shouldn't have the monopoly over game ratings, and it shouldn't have the authority to tell stores who they can or can't sell to.

Why not have multiple ratings boards and let the free market decide whose rating they trust the most?

stevefox1200
its use plus its not like there is a magic block that stops people who are not of the proper age from playing the game. Sure an 11 year old can't buy the game on their own but if a responsable adult buys it its fine.
There are people who don't want their kids playing Street Fighter. Why is it that kids can buy Street Fighter without their parents' permission? Why should ESRB be the one who gets to draw the line for what is or isn't appropriate for a certain age group?

stevefox1200
The whole no guns for Snake thing was probably just ass covering. I doubt that guns would have gave the game an M rating but they were making sure that they didn't have any really parent unfriendly content. The game was already rated T and they didn't want to push it.
If we had several ratings boards, the one that the most people used would be the one whose standards developers followed while making their games. Then they'd be appealing to a ratings system that the consumers have decided was the best, instead of a ratings system that uses standards none of us ever agreed to.

stevefox1200
Plus how the hell would you beat guns? The fire faster than your eyes can detect and watching Snake gun down Mario or Kirby would be ridiculously stupid
There are guns that fire fast in Smash Bros., it's just that they all shoot lasers. Which brings up another point; what if I don't want my kids playing games with laser guns, because I think that laser guns are just as violent as any other kind of gun? The ESRB doesn't mention that there are laser guns in Smash Bros. on the box, and they label it as appropriate for teenagers. Because ESRB is the only rating system there is, parents who don't want their kids playing games with laser guns have no ratings board to go by.

Rawlin67
it's pointless because people don't pay attention to it, but it's NOT pointless for the reasons the OP stated. it could be very effective and helpful if most people weren't idiots.
Most people don't pay attention to it because it doesn't accurately represent the values of most people. Most parents don't think it's a big deal for a kid in high school to play an M rated video game. There are also some parents who don't agree that games that include any violence at all, like Street Fighter, are appropriate for teenagers. That's probably why most people don't use it. They've probably used it before and realized that they don't agree with it.

If I never agree with IGN's game reviews, I'm going to stop basing my purchasing decisions on what they say. I'll find another site that reviews games, one that I tend to agree with more often, and I'll use their reviews to help me decide which games I might like.

I can't do that with ratings, because there's only one ratings system. If I find that I almost never agree with ESRB's ratings, I have no other ratings systems to go by. So I'll end up just not paying attention to ratings at all when I'm buying a game for a minor. That's why most parents don't care what the ESRB says. If there were more ratings boards, more parents would find one that they liked and go by what that one says is appropriate for their children.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top