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You spent too much time looking at my avatar and s
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I remember when they rented consoles so you could try before you buy them
 

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I was born in 1987, and I remember my family and I rented movies and video games from Hollywood Video in the 90's.

It would be really cool to see video stores return. It would be so nostalgic and bring back great memories of before the 21st century.

I still think physical media is better than digital media, and I still buy physical media, when possible. With physical media, you get box art, paper inserts, the actual disc itself, etc. I love physical media. I like physically owning, collecting, etc, movies, TV shows, video games, music, etc, that I really like.

As outdated as it might seem in 2019, I've never bought a movie on a streaming service like Google Play or Vudu. I like to actually own the movies I like and physically display them on the shelf.
 

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In the late 90s and early 2000s Blockbuster was THE place for new video games and DVDS. It was more like a meetup place where you would bump into people you know, Netflix really does not have that feel.

Good memories renting Tomb Raider 2 here when it dropped, Good memories renting The Mummy returns DVD when it dropped, just so many memories renting new games when they dropped, Gamestop can not compare. Who can forget when Max Payne dropped and there was a line of 14 people trying to rent it lmao.
What many people don't realize is that BlockBuster at one point had exclusive first rights release which means many new movie releases went to BlockBuster to be rented before anywhere else, and in some cases weren't available to be purchased. When Viacom owned BlockBuster that was the deal...theatre release, then exclusive BlockBuster rental, and then eventually available to purchase the hardcopy somewhere else or rent it somewhere else for cheap.

Although, many didn't agree with that model of exclusivity or first rights, it certainly was a strong model that worked for them for a while.

The problems with BlockBuster internationally started in the late 90's, but we just didn't notice it until 2005-2010.

Kind of hard to feel sorry for a company that eventually started overcharging its own customers to rent movies, video games, popcorn, and then started calling its loyal customers as pirates when streaming movies became popular.

Blockbuster's execs never took streaming seriously, and even dismissed Netflix.

Calling customers Pirates, and then mocking streaming and refusing to buy Netflix for $50 Million dollars really showed how incompetent their execs had become.

Although I do miss going to BlockBuster and renting a new video game or a new movie....it became too expensive. If you wanted to rent a season of a show such as Family Guy or Friends at BlockBuster you had to pay per dvd, not per season.

Compare the price of a Netflix account today at let's say $10.99/month for a library of movies, television series, and then you realize just how bad BlockBuster was ripping you off considering their parent company.

There is a way to bring back the traditional version of renting a hardcopy video or game, but it will have to involve exclusivity.

The one company that can bring back BlockBuster is for Disney to purchase it from Dish Network and then open a couple of locations in every major city.

I know Disney is going to create their own online streaming service and also include Hulu, ESPN, 21st Century Fox, etc in that, but people still want the hardcopy.

A hypothetical revived BlockBuster via Disney exclusive would have to include a two tiered rental payment....one monthly for cheap like at $10/month for 10 movies and videogames or the traditional style one but for cheap at like $1.99 per movie for 3 days.

Disney exclusive BlockBuster could bring in a new wave of competition with Paramount and Netflix getting back into the hardcopy rental industry. Netflix/Paramount partnership could work if they buy Family Video or revive the old Hollywood Video.

I still want to see a place that rents out new video games for cheap instead of buying a video game and then rarely playing it after a couple of months. Rent it, play the crap out of it for a week, and then return it.
 

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certainly miss having experiences like picking an n64 game to rent for the weekend, however its really not needed anymore with today's technology
 

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I must away and tend to my ravens
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What many people don't realize is that BlockBuster at one point had exclusive first rights release which means many new movie releases went to BlockBuster to be rented before anywhere else, and in some cases weren't available to be purchased. When Viacom owned BlockBuster that was the deal...theatre release, then exclusive BlockBuster rental, and then eventually available to purchase the hardcopy somewhere else or rent it somewhere else for cheap.

Although, many didn't agree with that model of exclusivity or first rights, it certainly was a strong model that worked for them for a while.

The problems with BlockBuster internationally started in the late 90's, but we just didn't notice it until 2005-2010.

Kind of hard to feel sorry for a company that eventually started overcharging its own customers to rent movies, video games, popcorn, and then started calling its loyal customers as pirates when streaming movies became popular.

Blockbuster's execs never took streaming seriously, and even dismissed Netflix.

Calling customers Pirates, and then mocking streaming and refusing to buy Netflix for $50 Million dollars really showed how incompetent their execs had become.

Although I do miss going to BlockBuster and renting a new video game or a new movie....it became too expensive. If you wanted to rent a season of a show such as Family Guy or Friends at BlockBuster you had to pay per dvd, not per season.

Compare the price of a Netflix account today at let's say $10.99/month for a library of movies, television series, and then you realize just how bad BlockBuster was ripping you off considering their parent company.

There is a way to bring back the traditional version of renting a hardcopy video or game, but it will have to involve exclusivity.

The one company that can bring back BlockBuster is for Disney to purchase it from Dish Network and then open a couple of locations in every major city.

I know Disney is going to create their own online streaming service and also include Hulu, ESPN, 21st Century Fox, etc in that, but people still want the hardcopy.

A hypothetical revived BlockBuster via Disney exclusive would have to include a two tiered rental payment....one monthly for cheap like at $10/month for 10 movies and videogames or the traditional style one but for cheap at like $1.99 per movie for 3 days.

Disney exclusive BlockBuster could bring in a new wave of competition with Paramount and Netflix getting back into the hardcopy rental industry. Netflix/Paramount partnership could work if they buy Family Video or revive the old Hollywood Video.

I still want to see a place that rents out new video games for cheap instead of buying a video game and then rarely playing it after a couple of months. Rent it, play the crap out of it for a week, and then return it.
I've never used them but https://www.gamefly.com/games may be what you're after.
 

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Never been to a Blockbuster in my life, there was one in my town but it was a 15 minutes from my house by car whereas the local independent video rental place was 3 minutes away on foot and 50p cheaper.
I thought I was the only with that situation. On my case, the nearest Blockbuster was one hour away on a car... In Capital City!

I had Netflix. Sadly, my modem was disgraded and signal was weak on my Smart TV. In addition, a few months ago, parents cancelled because it is expensive to pay right now. I'd like to hire Amazon Prime Video to watch "The Boys" or "Carnival Row" or "The Golden Compass Series".
 

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You need to be yourself, you can't be no-one else.
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Calling customers Pirates, and then mocking streaming and refusing to buy Netflix for $50 Million dollars really showed how incompetent their execs had become.

Although I do miss going to BlockBuster and renting a new video game or a new movie....it became too expensive. If you wanted to rent a season of a show such as Family Guy or Friends at BlockBuster you had to pay per dvd, not per season.

Compare the price of a Netflix account today at let's say $10.99/month for a library of movies, television series, and then you realize just how bad BlockBuster was ripping you off considering their parent company.
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I think a main problem with many of these big companies is that they build themselves into a success based on a model and stick hard to that model under the belief that "if it aint broke don't fix it"........problem is that doesnt work, time moves on, newer technology becomes available and they get left behind and start struggling.

Thats pretty much what happened with toys r us. They basically didn't look at the online market, they stuck to primarily selling out of stores when people were predominantly buying online (and getting better deals at that). They basically pushed themselves out of the market by refusing to evolve. People are not going to drive to a store and pay more for a product that they can buy on amazon cheaper and get it delivered to their door.

whether going to a store is more "fun" doesnt matter, people are busy and generally lazy so want the most convenient method possible. Online streaming and shopping therefore trumps driving all the way to the store. If online is cheaper than the store (it usually is) then they are doomed, there is no upside there besides getting a "classic experience".
 

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I do miss the feeling of going to the store, looking through stuff, holding the actual thing.

I don't miss having to take it back when I'm tired or busy. I don't miss the late fees.
 

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Oh Becky Becky, Becky Becky Becky Becky Becky Lync
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No, Blockbuster (or Xtravision) shouldn't return at all as they're quite pointless nowadays. Why go into a store to rent a movie you may like when it's perhaps easier to find a stream, and the stream is free, or you can pick up DVD's quite cheap nowadays? It served it's purpose but they don't need to return.

I used Xtravision once whenever the South Park movie was released before my Dad used to have an account with them - returned the film when it was finished and never really felt the need to use them again.
 

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I think a main problem with many of these big companies is that they build themselves into a success based on a model and stick hard to that model under the belief that "if it aint broke don't fix it"........problem is that doesnt work, time moves on, newer technology becomes available and they get left behind and start struggling.

Thats pretty much what happened with toys r us. They basically didn't look at the online market, they stuck to primarily selling out of stores when people were predominantly buying online (and getting better deals at that). They basically pushed themselves out of the market by refusing to evolve. People are not going to drive to a store and pay more for a product that they can buy on amazon cheaper and get it delivered to their door.

whether going to a store is more "fun" doesnt matter, people are busy and generally lazy so want the most convenient method possible. Online streaming and shopping therefore trumps driving all the way to the store. If online is cheaper than the store (it usually is) then they are doomed, there is no upside there besides getting a "classic experience".

I know streaming is more convenient and I have already stated how Blockbuster's former execs screwed up, but a revived Blockbuster would work with first or exclusive rights for a few months on new releases for movies, games, television series, and with a low price tiered membership. If you take the Disney example mentioned earlier, you will see how much Disney now owns. Large companies such as Disney with distribution, production, content could easily do it, and do it for cheap. I understand streaming is cheaper, but in the long run that might not always be the case when you realize that large content companies such as Google, Disney, etc are now renting out abandoned factories, caves to house data. You also have large telecom companies (ISPs) claiming unlimited internet only to eventually throttle their customers bandwidth at times.

With the right execs, marketing, philosophy, technology, exclusivity, locations it can be done. If you can wait 20 minutes at a drive-thru for a cup of coffee then you can go to a new video store and get that physical copy of that new release.

It's going to come to a point in a couple or so years when $20/month for Disney+ or Netflix might not be worth it and instead just rent 10 videos, series, games for like $15 a month from a revived Blockbuster knowing they have first rights on new releases. If people want a new release and they can get the physical copy for cheap then yes they will go out of their way to rent it knowing it can only be at a revived Blockbuster first.
 
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