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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
BBC News said:
The head of the British army has complained to the BBC about a drama showing bullying among troops in Afghanistan, calling it "deeply offensive to all those serving".

The episode features a corporal who bullies two friends who join the Army, one of whom goes on to commit suicide.

The BBC said it was in no way an attempt to denigrate the Army.

The writer of the series, Bafta-winning TV dramatist Jimmy McGovern, has said that Accused is a work of fiction and that he had the greatest respect for British soldiers.

McGovern, who also created Cracker and The Street, said: "As a dramatist, I was interested in exploring how soldiers have to be at a certain mindset to kill.

"It is not my intention to slur British soldiers, for whom I have the greatest respect. At the heart of the drama is my belief in the sanctity of life."

"We have asked the BBC to make it clear that this is a fictitious programme, is not accurate and that the Army has nothing to do with making it."

The episode is one of a six-part series following different people accused of crimes as they await the verdict of their trials. It stars Mackenzie Crook as a bullying corporal.

The Ministry of Defence said Sir Peter, the Chief of the General Staff, believed the episode was offensive to both troops and their families.

A spokesman said: "There are fears that those watching it will believe this is what is really happening to their loved ones.

A BBC spokeswoman said: "In the promotion of this new drama series... it has been made clear that Accused is a work of fiction.

"It is in no way an attempt to denigrate the servicemen and women of the British Army."

Last week prominent 2003 Iraq war veteran Colonel Tim Collins said the drama "fails the soldiers on the front line" and "abjectly fails the responsibility test".

Col Collins gained worldwide recognition for the eve-of-battle speech he gave his men in the Royal Irish Regiment in March 2003.

The decorated soldier, who retired from the Army in 2004, attacked the episode for its "gratuitous violence" and use of "foul and abusive language".

"There is no point to Accused except to try to shock," he told the Radio Times.
I'd be interested to know what everyone - particularly British people - think about this. I don't see why this is at all "offensive". It is a work of fiction and I don't believe that any organisation should be off-limits.

The BBC has Spooks, a drama that covers MI5 and often depicts British spies getting involved in murderous or other nefarious activities. Why is that permissible but a show about the army is declared heinous?

No offense meant to our American friends, but I fear we are moving towards an American model in respect to our armed forces, where any attitudes other than total submission, deference and canonisation are decried as unpatriotic or somehow evil.
 

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I'm pretty sure that anybody who's fighting out in Iraq, Afghanistan or wherever else is probably thick-skinned enough to not give a dogfuck what some fictional show is portraying their career choice to be like. I'd say they're probably a lot more concerned with all those bullets flying by their heads and just being able to reach the end of a road in one piece.
 

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These army blokes just don't want anything being released that could give the armed forces a bad name, so now this bloke has said it's offensive to the troops to try and get the public to think along the same lines of him, so when they see the show they don't think "oh the army is a horrible place, full of bullying". They think "what horrible people the BBC are, offending our dear troops like this."
 

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I'd be interested to know what everyone - particularly British people - think about this. I don't see why this is at all "offensive". It is a work of fiction and I don't believe that any organisation should be off-limits.

The BBC has Spooks, a drama that covers MI5 and often depicts British spies getting involved in murderous or other nefarious activities. Why is that permissible but a show about the army is declared heinous?

No offense meant to our American friends, but I fear we are moving towards an American model in respect to our armed forces, where any attitudes other than total submission, deference and canonisation are decried as unpatriotic or somehow evil.
Didn't see it but I don't see why the word offensive even constitutes an arguement. Newsflash, people do not have the right not to be offended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Didn't see it but I don't see why the word offensive even constitutes an arguement. Newsflash, people do not have the right not to be offended.
OMG. I love those lines, I'm upset that I didn't think of them myself. I'm appropriating them for future usage. If I ever make it big in politics I'll give you all due credit.
 
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