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As most of us are, I am fascinated by the behind-the-scenes world of professional wrestling.

Politics, as we all know, is more apparent in this field of entertainment than maybe any, ever. If you're a sportsman and you're good, you'll most probably get what you deserve sooner or later, same goes with acting/music and the likes since there are so many different teams, production houses and record labels, who always want to showcase the best talent and outdo each other. With professional wrestling however, thing are a bit different. The business has evolved (or maybe methodically made by Vince) to an industry with a near-monopoly by one huge entity, and other smaller promotions being almost non-existent (maybe TNA can be an exception to this).

Everyone wants to get into the WWE, and vast majority of wrestlers would rather be a jobber in the E than be a big fish in a small pond, for the pay and the global exposure. With only two weekly shows, not even strictly separated as brands anymore, there aren't too many spots to fill on the top. The well documented backstage group, the Kliq, were a group of close friends who were all major stars in their own rights and stuck together to not only party hard, but to protect each other politically as well.

Now, what truly baffles me is why people only ever talk about this group as one of its kind (or at least that I know of). I know Undertaker hung out together with some guys called the BSK, but I've never heard/read of anything political to do with them. Also, I think Jericho, Malenko, Guerrero, Juvi, Rey and Benoit used to hang out but I'm not sure if there were a legitimate group or just close friends.

My question is am I just misinformed?
Or is the Kliq really one of it's kind?
And what about backstage groups in WWE, NWA turfs, and ECW?

Surely, some other group of guys before/after the 90s must have thought of getting stronger backstage and ensuring their top spot. There is strength is numbers after all. Plus, as frowned upon as it may be, the Kliq really did well for themselves and are all legends today.
 

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I don't really understand how the Kliq gained any sort of influence.
Well, here's my understanding behind the idea, someone correct me if I'm wrong

Shawn Michaels was fucking Shawn Michaels. Razor Ramon and Diesel had both become top level talent and were both main event players. Razor was massively over, and Diesel was huge with the crowds plus had gotten monster pushes and was winning titles very fast. Hunter Hearst Helmsley may have been stuck with a crap gimmick, but many believed he was a fine talent (as he was) and would do great things for the company in the future. 123 kid was a very good worker, but really not as prominent as the others were.

They were all close friends, and so they decided to get together to basically 'watch each other's backs' politically. They weren't being ridiculously unreasonable and saying fire everyone else or anything, but it is documented that they were extremely douchey and would only have any sort of regard for what they wanted. Say, HBK didn't want to do a job, he'd flat out tell Vince he wasn't doing it, and Vince would have to either increase his pay and beg him for it, or just listen to him, because he couldn't afford to lose his 3 of his biggest stars. And the problem wouldn't be them simply walking out like now, WCW was gaining prominence and no way could Vince let the people he made stars go elsewhere and compete with him (of course this ended up happening anyway).

I've read (in dirtsheets, so beware) that they pretty much ruled the locker room and the only other two people that Vince would even consider going against the Kliq's wishes were Undertaker and Bret Hart. Anyway, it all had to end, Hall and Nash left, with the kayfabe breaking Curtain Call. Hbk was Hbk like previously mentioned, so Triple H was jobbed out for fucking months on end since the Kliq were no longer the power they once were. But as destiny would have it, the outsiders/nwo as well as the DX were massive successes and the Kliq members went on to each become true legends in their own rights
 

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The Kliq werent the only group that were notorious in the 90s. There were many at the time but the difference is Kliq was mostly in the spotlight thanks to Shawn Michaels.
 

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I don't really understand how the Kliq gained any sort of influence.
Well this is it because in reality they didn't have any more influence or backstage power than The Undertaker or Bret Hart but because they were the most talented and big name group the majority of them had top spots and were seen as having such backstage power because the majority of the group were in the spots they were. I remember watching a shoot interview in which it was said no one said anything about Shawn Michaels or Scott Hall having backstage power when they were helping write parts of Raw in 1993 because they were mid card wrestlers who got tv time but lots of it but once 1995 rolled around and Kevin Nash was WWE champion, Shawn Michaels was being built up to be the new top guy and Scott Hall was the main staple of the mid card it was backstage power.

A lot of people say they would only work with each other because of their friendship so that way they would make big money with each other as back then there were no guaranteed contracts and most big money that could be made was cuts of PPV money. The thing is as said by others Bret Hart basically worked with his family and friends in Owen Hart, The British Bulldog, Jim Neidhart, Bob Backlund and Jerry Lawler from mid 1993 through to late 1995 almost exclusively and The Undertaker worked with either people associated with Ted DiBiase or Yokozuna who was one of his best friends and a member of their BSK group from late 1993 through to late 1995 as well so both The Undertaker and Bret Hart were doing the same and making money with their own family and friends.

I'm not going to defend The Clique in the fact they were said to be pricks to people backstage and were hard to get on with because they were such a close knit group who rarely let outsiders in they alienated almost everyone backstage but the reality was it was only in 1995 that they were a group as Kevin Nash, Scott Hall and Sean Waltman were gone in 1996. I've never heard a bad story about the group from before 1995 which was the year they were mainly on top but it seems a lot of what was said was jealousy because of the success the group had in 1995 and it was perceived as backstage power because people could understand how a group of friends could all be on top like that despite Bret Hart's friends and family doing so the year before.
 

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apparently , Taker , Yoko , Savio Vega , and the Godwins were a group backstage and called themselves the "Bone Street Krew" , it's the reason why "BSK" is tattooed on Taker's abdomen

they weren't dicks like the Klique tho , they were to keep backstage shennanigans away , Savio tells a story on how Taker and Yoko were waiting for Scott hall and HBK to hassel him just so they could fuck them up

these guys weren't joking , they were legit and didn't fuck around or take shit from anybody , they were the anti-klique
 

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apparently , Taker , Yoko , Savio Vega , and the Godwins were a group backstage and called themselves the "Bone Street Krew" , it's the reason why "BSK" is tattooed on Taker's abdomen

they weren't dicks like the Klique tho , they were to keep backstage shennanigans away , Savio tells a story on how Taker and Yoko were waiting for Scott hall and HBK to hassel him just so they could fuck them up

these guys weren't joking , they were legit and didn't fuck around or take shit from anybody , they were the anti-klique
I never knew about the BSK tbh, thanks for that.
 

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Fuck the Kliq. If you think about it, they fucked wrestling over hard.
 

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Hulk Hogan had his buddies: Brutus Beefcake and Jimmy Hart. Not so much a group, but very close. He was also good pals with Earthquake and Jim Duggan, who he helped bring to WCW and keep in employment for some time.

Perfect, Rude and the Legion of Doom were possibly pretty close.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The Kliq werent the only group that were notorious in the 90s. There were many at the time but the difference is Kliq was mostly in the spotlight thanks to Shawn Michaels.
What were these other notorious groups?
 

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Lets be honest here, the Klique's whole attitude and personality was a major factor for the revolution in wrestling in the mid-90's - first the nWo in WCW with Nash and Hall, then HBK bringing "attitude" to the WWE (yeah, he brought attitude before Austin). The reason they get hated on is because they made it to the top.
 

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Lets be honest here, the Klique's whole attitude and personality was a major factor for the revolution in wrestling in the mid-90's - first the nWo in WCW with Nash and Hall, then HBK bringing "attitude" to the WWE (yeah, he brought attitude before Austin). The reason they get hated on is because they made it to the top.
Goldust brought attitude before all of them...
 

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Bret Hart's book has an excellent chapter on The Kliq and is an excellent read.

While groups of friends and allegiances are common in every workplace, The Kliq was a very deliberate attempt at taking control of the industry, inspired by Buddy Rogers who had done the same thing decades earlier.
 

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During the 90's many of the wrestlers would form groups and the sole purpose of this group was to watch each others back. The Kliq was more well known because they would use their backstage power on many occasions. While most groups objective was to '' look after each other and protect one another'' the Kliq took that objective to a whole new level and in the process destroyed peoples career or lives for the sole purpose of protecting their own interest or for the pure enjoyment of it because they could. The Kliq buried many wrestler during the 90's and its kind a sad what they put Chris Cardido through during his time in the WWF.

And while were on this question here's a photo from 1996 that feature the BSK and the Kliq
http://www.percypringle.com/Gallery-Pictures/Room-1/Photos/WWFonTour.gif
From left to right is Henry Godwin, Kevin Nash, The Undertaker, Phineas Godwin (Mideon), Stone Cold, Scott Hall, Shawn Michales, X-Pac and at the front Triple H, Brisco and Paul Bearer.
 

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Wasn't the difference with the Kliq and other groups is that the Kliq would RARELY job to non Kliq members?
How many people did Bret Hart lose to in between late 1992 and WrestleMania 12 outside of his group of his friends and family in Owen Hart, The British Bulldog and Jerry Lawler or how many people did The Undertaker lose to outside of people with Ted DiBiase or his best friend Yokozuna. It's just The Clique had the WWE champion in Kevin Nash and two of the best all round in ring performers in Shawn Michaels and Scott Hall in their group who were top of the card so were heavily pushed for why you hear about them but not Bret Hart's friends and family or The Undertaker and the BSK.
 
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