Wrestling Forum banner

1 - 20 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In high school and college, all the teachers and guidance counselors told me that college was so important for your future.

Today?

I'm a college graduate currently working full-time. Nothing I learned in college relates, even slightly, to my job duties (or to the job duties of my co-workers, including my supervisors).

Likewise, during the job hunt that lead to this job, I did around 5-6 interviews at various places. Not one person ever inquired about what I learned in college, nor did I ever feel that the material I learned was relevant to anything.

It seems to me that a college degree is just something that fulfills the requirement on a job ad; employers just want to see that you have one. I truly believe that college shouldn't be so necessary in a job search.
 

·
Indeed
Joined
·
16,945 Posts
I prefer Tech Schools or Vocational Schools just for this purpose. Most are for-profit and thus tuition is expensive, but at the very least, you'll actually be learning your tricks of the trade instead of wallowing in studies that have absolutely nothing to do with what you want to do in life. For those who are going to major somewhere in the academic field, though, traditional colleges and universities are obviously much better.
 

·
Magic, sparkles and Strap-ons!
Joined
·
14,226 Posts
A lot of what I learned had to be unlearned when I did my job. I'm perplexed why College and real world application differ for some Careers so greatly. You think they'd be on par with each other.

It does explain why some College kids are completely delusional about the real world and cannot function outside of college.
 

·
From parts unknown
Joined
·
22,942 Posts
Sociology, yes. Holy fuck it took me more than a decade to get rid of the insane amount of Canadian socialist/anti-corporatist/Keynesian brainwashing that I experienced in those 3 years of my college. I was an early 2000's SJW and was one till at least 2010 based on my earliest facebook posts.

MBA, No. It helped me eventually wipe the slate clean and free myself of the college indoctrination that I experienced - even though for the initial part of my career it made me a less effective employee as I was still in the fog of believing that every corporation I worked for was "evil" in some way or the other ... Believing that making money was innately evil and therefore had resigned myself to a bit of a hippie non-materialistic life. Eventually however, I realized that that was a form of religious indoctrination and I had to unlearn what I had learnt in my bullshit Canadian education experience to become a better worker and person as a whole.

This Christmas I let myself go and enjoy the fruits of the labor of hard work. We went on a shopping spree and spent close to $2000 bucks in a month (on top of bills) and it feels damned good. I'm the happiest I've ever been ... and I attribute some of my earlier discontent and unhappiness to my college indoctrination. I also wouldn't be surprised if a lot of SJW's that appear to be so unhappy are such as a result of the horrible content of their college courses today. I'm sure there's a "sociological study" in there somewhere :troll
 

·
JANUARY 5TH
Joined
·
4,034 Posts
Unless your department is about arts or sports or practical things like that, and if you don't pursue to be an academic; YES it is pointless in most of the time.

I am about to graduate in 2 weeks now and already understand what you are going through.
 

·
Magic, sparkles and Strap-ons!
Joined
·
14,226 Posts
Sociology, yes. Holy fuck it took me more than a decade to get rid of the insane amount of Canadian socialist/anti-corporatist/Keynesian brainwashing that I experienced in those 3 years of my college. I was an early 2000's SJW and was one till at least 2010 based on my earliest facebook posts.

MBA, No. It helped me eventually wipe the slate clean and free myself of the college indoctrination that I experienced - even though for the initial part of my career it made me a less effective employee as I was still in the fog of believing that every corporation I worked for was "evil" in some way or the other ... Believing that making money was innately evil and therefore had resigned myself to a bit of a hippie non-materialistic life. Eventually however, I realized that that was a form of religious indoctrination and I had to unlearn what I had learnt in my bullshit Canadian education experience to become a better worker and person as a whole.

This Christmas I let myself go and enjoy the fruits of the labor of hard work. We went on a shopping spree and spent close to $2000 bucks in a month (on top of bills) and it feels damned good. I'm the happiest I've ever been ... and I attribute some of my earlier discontent and unhappiness to my college indoctrination. I also wouldn't be surprised if a lot of SJW's that appear to be so unhappy are such as a result of the horrible content of their college courses today. I'm sure there's a "sociological study" in there somewhere :troll
A friend of mine is a very smart cookie and she took sociology and became a completely different person, she's now more even but before it was awful. The problem with some College classes is that some aren't factual but taught as fact, it's pretty dangerous when you think about it.
 

·
Ilya Smirnov ate my puppy.
Joined
·
4,920 Posts
College, with a few exceptions, isn't so much about what you learn, but how you learn. You can't possibly be taught everything you will ever need to know in a 4-year program to succeed in the real world, but for the most part a good college education gives you the foundation upon which to build your own success. Life, after all, is a never-ending learning experience. It is by no means the only way, depending on your areas of interest, levels of self-motivated and other factors. But generally speaking, college grads tend to have a better rounded background to hit the job market with. What you get out of an undergrad college education is not what you've learned, but learning how to learn. Kind of the same concept as teaching a man to fish. That's very much less the case in grad school, where concentrations are so much more specific and applied.

I've heard many educators deliver a similar message at graduation time: school is done, now your education begins.
 

·
All out of bubblegum.
Joined
·
5,301 Posts
In the UK, university applications are done as part of the curriculum for most who continue in education past 16.

As part of this, the myth is still perpetuated that you will walk into a £30k job post uni but this hasn't been true (and going to uni hasn't been a big deal) since at the latest the early 2000s.

It's still worth it for high flyers with specific goals but for 90% of uni students, they are just putting off the jobs they eventually do anyways (and would of been better off going straight into) to do a pointless humanities degree.

My city is full of graduates working minimum wage jobs in retail, care, hospitality and call centres.

I recently hired a guy who's been out of Uni 2 years with a degree in Law and a masters in European law to do the baseline minimum wage job at my company.

The guy has the common sense of a toothpick though and that's another issue, I lived alone and worked full time for 2 years before I went to uni but many people come out with not only a pointless qualification but minimal lifeskills cause they've lived off a loan, their parents and microwavable meals for 3 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,642 Posts
I honestly think college is pointless. A lot of the jobs that people pay a shitload of money to get a degree for that career field can be done without a degree. All they need is 1-3 weeks of paid on the job training before actually working and they're ok.
 

·
From parts unknown
Joined
·
22,942 Posts
It's still worth it for high flyers with specific goals but for 90% of uni students, they are just putting off the jobs they eventually do anyways (and would of been better off going straight into) to do a pointless humanities degree.

My city is full of graduates working minimum wage jobs in retail, care, hospitality and call centres.
This is the key here but with certain countries more so than others. Canada, Australia and UK seem to have a much harder time creating jobs for graduates than America where I consistently still hear about college graduates getting very decent high paying jobs.

Everyone that my wife worked with that went to school found a job right after which is why my wife is in Business School right now herself. We're extremely confident that she's going to find work near one of the mega-cities right after and she's already made senior management at her company just on the basis of high school (that said, my wife is one of the high flyers you're talking about too so I suppose that does make a difference as well).

In any case, I think it's a government regulation issue (over-taxation, higher barriers to entry for entrepreneurs, high minimum wage rates etc) that has created a climate of poor job prospects for college grads in certain cities and even countries in the western world rather than lack of decent college education itself. Of course, the fact that people are getting ridiculous degrees in shit like "feminist dance therapy" and the like has a lot to do with their lack of job prospects as well. Schools are definitely ripping students off by implying good job prospects with bullshit degrees.

I honestly think college is pointless. A lot of the jobs that people pay a shitload of money to get a degree for that career field can be done without a degree. All they need is 1-3 weeks of paid on the job training before actually working and they're ok.
Not all college degrees are pointless in America. Only the ridiculously specialized social "science" ones are for the most part but even those cultural marxists have created an industry amongst themselves.

As long as you get a degree in something that's in high demand, you're set for life. I mean, if you're getting a degree where you watch movies and read books for 3 years, then of course that's useless. But if you're majoring as an engineer or any kind of technical expertise, then you're pretty much guaranteed a career.

This idea that "you should do what your heart desires" is a bigger problem than we're told. If you want to work, then you don't always or shouldn't always simply do only what you like to do ... until and unless you have an entrepreneurial spirit and can create your own brand out of it.
 

·
All out of bubblegum.
Joined
·
5,301 Posts
It's still worth it for high flyers with specific goals but for 90% of uni students, they are just putting off the jobs they eventually do anyways (and would of been better off going straight into) to do a pointless humanities degree.

My city is full of graduates working minimum wage jobs in retail, care, hospitality and call centres.
This is the key here but with certain countries more so than others. Canada, Australia and UK seem to have a much harder time creating jobs for graduates than America where I consistently still hear about college graduates getting very decent high paying jobs.

Everyone that my wife worked with that went to school found a job right after which is why my wife is in Business School right now herself. We're extremely confident that she's going to find work near one of the mega-cities right after and she's already made senior management at her company just on the basis of high school (that said, my wife is one of the high flyers you're talking about too so I suppose that does make a difference as well).

In any case, I think it's a government regulation issue (over-taxation, higher barriers to entry for entrepreneurs, high minimum wage rates etc) that has created a climate of poor job prospects for college grads in certain cities and even countries in the western world rather than lack of decent college education itself. Of course, the fact that people are getting ridiculous degrees in shit like "feminist dance therapy" and the like has a lot to do with their lack of job prospects as well. Schools are definitely ripping students off by implying good job prospects with bullshit degrees.
I'd assume that a lot of the UK's issue is how London centric our industry is with London inhabitants making up almost a 7th of the population.

After London our next biggest city is Manchester which is a quarter the size of London and tiny in comparison to big US cities.

Obviously stupid degrees don't help, it's ridiculous that they exist and that people pay for them.
But 20 years ago English or History degrees were worthwhile and respected whilst now there no more valuable than David Beckham studies at half the unis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
In high school and college, all the teachers and guidance counselors told me that college was so important for your future.

Today?

I'm a college graduate currently working full-time. Nothing I learned in college relates, even slightly, to my job duties (or to the job duties of my co-workers, including my supervisors).

Likewise, during the job hunt that lead to this job, I did around 5-6 interviews at various places. Not one person ever inquired about what I learned in college, nor did I ever feel that the material I learned was relevant to anything.

It seems to me that a college degree is just something that fulfills the requirement on a job ad; employers just want to see that you have one. I truly believe that college shouldn't be so necessary in a job search.
Depends on what you study and what is your work, wouldnt it mean that are careers that are useless?, or that there is not enough jobs to do for your area of studies
 

·
From parts unknown
Joined
·
22,942 Posts
I'd assume that a lot of the UK's issue is how London centric our industry is with London inhabitants making up almost a 7th of the population.

After London our next biggest city is Manchester which is a quarter the size of London and tiny in comparison to big US cities.

Obviously stupid degrees don't help, it's ridiculous that they exist and that people pay for them.
But 20 years ago English or History degrees were worthwhile and respected whilst now there no more valuable than David Beckham studies at half the unis.
This is why I brought up government regulations as part of the problem. Small towns get built on the strength of local entrepreneurship and eternally surviving family businesses that almost never grow beyond a certain size. I don't think that a lot of hybrid social welfare/capitalist states should foster anti-small business climates in their countries and encourage towns to grow on the strength of pro-small business policies - which would decrease the pressure on big cities with regards to providing employment opportunities.

Before moving to small town America, I thought it was all mostly a wasteland as is implied within movies ... but that's far from the case. Even a small town as this one (population of 70k) has a relatively thriving middle class on the strength of several major industries (tourism towards Orlando, Tampa and Miami and NASA around Daytona and Cape Canaveral), but at the same time, the town itself has sustained a lot of opportunities for locals because of relatively well to-do small businesses that compete well with mega-chains through business-friendly policies. You can see similar situations throughout American States where the small businesses are creating jobs for their communities ... One of the primary complaints about Obamacare was that it made it near impossible for small business owners to sustain themselves and saw that vote shift from democrat to republican with the hope that it would be repealed. I believe that nationalized healthcare in other countries has similar burdens on small businesses and prevent people from creating businesses in their communities.

The one-size fits all capitalism of UK imo hurts small towns and that in turn has a negative impact on bigger cities which simply don't have the jobs in comparison to the larger American ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
It's pretty bad to generalize education. At least I consider it so because of the title of the thread. Would you go to a doctor who thinks 'oh, education is pointless'? I trust you wouldn't. Some aspects of education can be pointless. For instance, I, as an engineering student, had to write tons of essays. That's strange. Anyways, with a diploma, I had no problems with job searching. Well, I asked for help a firm which helps to write a decent CV https://edureviewer.com/resume/resumeprofessionalwriters-com-review/ (it's a review). But it's not a big deal.
 

·
The Sundance Kid
Joined
·
18,291 Posts
no because I didn't major in something that isn't worth anything to anyone

social science degrees are largely an indoctrination scam. turn you into a psuedo-marxist with no marketable skills. that way you won't have a good job, you'll be stuck with insurmountable debt, and will vote for a bigger government.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
595 Posts
Higher Education was fantastic for me. Apart from being a platform that introduced me to complex doctrines and problems, it gave me the capability to adopt critical thinking skills and logic.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
It's pretty bad to generalize education. At least I consider it so because of the title of the thread. Would you go to a doctor who thinks 'oh, education is pointless'? I trust you wouldn't. Some aspects of education can be pointless. For instance, I, as an engineering student, had to write tons of essays. That's strange. Anyways, with a diploma, I had no problems with job searching. Well, I asked for help a firm which helps to write a decent CV https://edureviewer.com/resume/resumeprofessionalwriters-com-review/ (it's a review). But it's not a big deal.
I got an engineering degree as well. If you want any kind of higher up job in a engineering field you need to have a degree. I know I would not be where I am without getting my degree.

I can see where some degrees are a waste of time and money though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,906 Posts
In high school and college, all the teachers and guidance counselors told me that college was so important for your future.

Today?

I'm a college graduate currently working full-time. Nothing I learned in college relates, even slightly, to my job duties (or to the job duties of my co-workers, including my supervisors).

Likewise, during the job hunt that lead to this job, I did around 5-6 interviews at various places. Not one person ever inquired about what I learned in college, nor did I ever feel that the material I learned was relevant to anything.

It seems to me that a college degree is just something that fulfills the requirement on a job ad; employers just want to see that you have one. I truly believe that college shouldn't be so necessary in a job search.
My degree does nothing for me. In reality, the people I see making loads of money are developers. I have 2 good friends who are making bank and they've always told me "I just chose computer science because I didn't know what to do". I should have just thrown darts at a board and studied whatever it landed on. 95% of what you learn in college will not be a factor at your job.

I will say that the idea of being in a routine, having to prove you're responsible, pursuing something that takes more than a few weeks...that's what should be focused on. I can't speak from a hiring standpoint, as it all seems random and dumb and employers are fucking awful in the US, but college serves the purpose of straightening up some people.

But, yeah. education wise college is no longer educating people; aside from some really good colleges and breakthrough professors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,855 Posts
I'd assume that a lot of the UK's issue is how London centric our industry is with London inhabitants making up almost a 7th of the population.

After London our next biggest city is Manchester which is a quarter the size of London and tiny in comparison to big US cities.

Obviously stupid degrees don't help, it's ridiculous that they exist and that people pay for them.
But 20 years ago English or History degrees were worthwhile and respected whilst now there no more valuable than David Beckham studies at half the unis.
In the UK it seems to be more about the university you came from as opposed to the degree itself (with the likes of Medicine and Engineering being an obvious exception). A degree in Media Studies or Film Studies at Oxbridge (if they even have them), and maybe even some of the Russell Group Universities is probably of more value than Law and Economics at some low ranking ex-poly like University of West Scotland or London Met in the eyes of employers, especially those multinational City of London types.

After London our next biggest city is Manchester which is a quarter the size of London and tiny in comparison to big US cities.
EDIT: Slightly off topic, but I thought Birmingham and Glasgow were bigger than Manchester? I thought the top 3 cities in the UK were London, Birmingham and Glasgow in that order?
 
1 - 20 of 57 Posts
Top