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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:14 PM Thread Starter
 
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US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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US measles outbreak is largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

(CNN) Measles cases in the United States have surpassed the highest number on record since the disease was declared eliminated nationwide in 2000.

Overall, there have been 681 measles cases across 22 states this year, according to CNN's analysis of data from state and local health departments.

The states reporting measles cases are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas and Washington.

As of Monday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 626 individual cases of measles confirmed in those 22 states. This includes illnesses reported by state health departments to the CDC through April 19 and therefore does not include cases reported since then.

The agency updates the number of measles cases each Monday.

Previously, the highest number of reported cases since elimination was 667 in 2014.

'Most of the cases that we're seeing are in unvaccinated communities'

Measles is a highly contagious disease caused by a virus that can spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes or if someone comes into direct contact or shares germs by touching the same objects or surfaces. Measles symptoms may include fever, cough, runny nose, watery eyes and a rash of red spots.

Most cases in the United States have emerged in communities with low rates of vaccination against the virus, according to public health officials.

"I do believe that parents' concerns about vaccines leads to undervaccination, and most of the cases that we're seeing are in unvaccinated communities," Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the CDC, said in February at a congressional hearing about measles outbreaks.

Nationally, the United States has high measles vaccination coverage. The CDC says 91.5% of US children aged 19 months to 35 months received at least one dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine in 2017, the most recent year available.

"However, there are pockets of people who are vaccine-hesitant," Messonnier said.

"Outbreaks of measles occur when measles gets into these communities of unvaccinated people," she said.

"The only way to protect against measles is to get vaccinated."

A source familiar with the measles situation in the United States previously told CNN that of the 626 cases of measles that federal officials counted as of last week, 72% are unvaccinated, and 18% have an unknown vaccination status. Among those who are unvaccinated, it may be because of personal beliefs and medical reasons. The other 10% were vaccinated with either one or two doses.

Of those 626 cases, 487 were in people 19 and younger.

Measles outbreaks -- defined as three or more cases -- have been ongoing this year in Rockland County, New York; New York City; Washington state; Santa Cruz County, California; New Jersey; Butte County, California; and Michigan.

The CDC has noted that those outbreaks are linked to travelers who were infected and brought measles back from other countries, including Israel, Ukraine and the Philippines.

For instance, the outbreak in New York, which was declared a public health emergency last month, began when an unvaccinated child became infected while visiting Israel, according to health officials.

A person from New York who was unknowingly contagious with the measles then visited Southeast Michigan, spreading the illness to at least 38 people there, according to Lynn Sutfin, public information officer for the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

The history of measles in America

In 1912, measles became a nationally notifiable disease in the United States, meaning it was required that health care providers and laboratories report diagnosed cases. In that first decade of reporting, an average of about 6,000 measles-related deaths were reported annually.

In the 1950s, researchers isolated the measles virus in a patient's blood, and in the 1960s, they were able to transform that virus into a vaccine. The vaccine was licensed and then used as part of a vaccination program.

Before the measles vaccination program was introduced in the United States in 1963, an estimated 3 million to 4 million people got the disease each year nationwide, according to the CDC. Afterward, cases and deaths from measles in the United States and other developed countries plummeted. There were 963 cases reported in the United States in 1994 and 508 in 1996.

By 2000, when there were only 86 cases, measles was declared eliminated from the United States, meaning there was no continuous transmission of the disease for more than 12 months.

Since 2000, the annual number of reported measles cases has ranged from 37 people in 2004 to 667 in 2014.

The measles, mumps and rubella vaccine -- known as the MMR vaccine -- is very effective. One dose is about 93% effective at preventing measles if you come into contact with the virus. Two doses are about 97% effective.

Experts recommend that children receive the vaccine in two doses: first between 12 months and 15 months of age and a second between 4 and 6 years old.

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of reactions, according to the CDC. These are usually mild and go away on their own, but there is a "remote chance" of side effects and even serious injuries.

Experts say the benefits outweigh the risks when it comes to the measles vaccine.

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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:18 PM
 
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

thanks right wingers

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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:22 PM
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

UGH.

Can we just shoot all these people to the moon or something?

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thanks right wingers
This has nothing to do with this.

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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:23 PM
 
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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UGH.

Can we just shoot all these people to the moon or something?



This has nothing to do with this.
Yes it does
its the dumb ass religious right wingers that dont want to vax their kids

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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:33 PM
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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Yes it does
its the dumb ass religious right wingers that dont want to vax their kids
no

http://theconversation.com/anti-vacc...rization-81001

Anti-vaccine stupidity is bipartisan.

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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:37 PM
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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Yes it does
its the dumb ass religious right wingers that dont want to vax their kids
What? Yeah they don't want to but the Hollywood "Left" such as McCarthy was pushing this crap and she's not some Conservative right winger.

Lots of posh and even yuppies and "holistic" types are anti-vaxxing.

Right Wingers wish they had the media attention these people do, let's not forget the main part of the anti-vaxx movement was because it caused Autism, not because "Muh Jesus". It was all based on junk Science that was disproved that still gets traction.

Seriously ease off with your Politics.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:39 PM
 
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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Yes it does
its the dumb ass religious right wingers that dont want to vax their kids
Literally every "dumb ass religious right winger" i know have vaccinated their kids.

Thinking about it, from my facebook friends list, I have seen 2 "friends" that have opted out of vaccinating their kids and neither are very religious and making a guess one is dem and one is repub. One is mid 30s and educated, married to a police officer and the other is mid/early 20s, not very educated and I dont believe her husband/significant other is very educated either.

Trust me when I say I am on the same page as you on vaccinating your children, I just dont know that there is one specific group you can apply it to, at least not from what I have seen.

IF there is a trend, it seems younger, less educated, almost hippy-esque women are the ones that are not vaccinating or at least anti vax. The younger girl I know, all her friends are starting to have kids so its creating some "interesting" conversations between her and the other parents.
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 02:43 PM
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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Originally Posted by birthday_massacre View Post
Yes it does
its the dumb ass religious right wingers that dont want to vax their kids
It's been a bipartisan thing.

https://theconversation.com/anti-vac...rization-81001

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When health officials learned that the 2015 measles outbreak was caused by clusters of unvaccinated children, Americans once more wanted to understand why some parents do not vaccinate their children. In our highly polarized culture, media commentators and even academics began to connect opposition to vaccination to either the left or right of politics.

So a question arises: Who is more likely to be opposed to vaccination, liberals or conservatives? As a sociologist who studies infectious disease, I took a look at this. The answer seems to depend on what question you ask.

Because the outbreak started in the wealthy, liberal enclave of Marin County, California, and because some of the best-known “anti-vaxxers” are Hollywood actors, some right-leaning media outlets connected opposition to vaccination to liberals and related it to other “anti-science” beliefs like fear of GMOs, use of alternative medicine, and even astrology. Other writers have opposed such a caricature and have argued that opposition to vaccination is actually either bipartisan or a specifically conservative problem. Academic research on the topic is also conflicted.

While historians have shown that there is a long history of opposition to vaccination in America, the contemporary anti-vaccination movement got its major boost in 1998 when Andrew Wakefield published faulty research in The Lancet that falsely claimed that the mumps, measles and rubella (MMR) vaccine was related to autism.

As to whether liberals or conservatives are now more likely to be opposed to vaccination, some researchers have suggested that, while anti-vaccination beliefs have spread to libertarians on the right, the anti-vaccination movement originates and finds its strongest support in the political left. A later article by the same researchers similarly argues that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evidence shows that states that voted for Obama in 2012 have higher rates of nonmedical vaccination exemptions.

Yet, other research suggests that it is in fact conservatives who are more likely to believe that vaccines cause autism, that it is liberals who are more likely to endorse pro-vaccination statements and that the more strongly someone identifies with the Republican Party, the more likely he or she is to have a negative opinion of vaccination.
If you really wanna be technical about it, two of the last big outbreaks were in the Ultra-Othodox Jewish community in NY (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/n...-jews-nyc.html) and the Somali-American community in Minnesota (https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...asles-outbreak). Both actually identify as democratic.

Really though, this is an EVERYBODY versus stupidity problem, it's not a party affiliated issue.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 06:14 PM
 
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

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Originally Posted by Dr. Middy View Post
It's been a bipartisan thing.

https://theconversation.com/anti-vac...rization-81001



If you really wanna be technical about it, two of the last big outbreaks were in the Ultra-Othodox Jewish community in NY (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/n...-jews-nyc.html) and the Somali-American community in Minnesota (https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...asles-outbreak). Both actually identify as democratic.

Really though, this is an EVERYBODY versus stupidity problem, it's not a party affiliated issue.
LOL it does not matter how bit an area is for democrats is the sect in an area that does not vaccine.

You could have an area that is 10,000 people 8,000 dems and 2,000 reps and if 500 republicans are not vaxxing are you going to blame the dems because the area has more dems.

That is not how it works.

When ever I see the anti-vaxxers is almost always right winged reglious nuts

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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019, 06:18 PM
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Re: US measles outbreak is now the largest since disease was declared eliminated in 2000

Yeah, Republicans are to blame for a measles outbreak in a Somali community.

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