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post #1 of 3 (permalink) Old 09-15-2009, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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Special Attraction Match: Headliner vs adnimbot

Since TDL is on an apparent hiatus, this is something I'm doing alone.

Which is more valuable to a professional wrestler, in ring ability or mic ability?

We can go back and forth until 11:59PM Thursday September 17th. Since you picked the topic, you can go first adnimbot.

No one else can post in this thread but me and adnimbot, btw.
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post #2 of 3 (permalink) Old 09-17-2009, 10:17 AM
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Re: Special Attraction Match: Headliner vs adnimbot

Sure mic work can be very helpful in order to be a successful professional wrestler, but it is by no means the most important thing in pro wrestling. The most important thing for someone who is a pro wrestler to do is to wrestle. It may sound crazy, but it's true.

Those who are able to work the mic well can be useful to some wrestling companies, but if you aren't above average in the ring, you aren't going to be a consistent main eventer, regradless of you mic skills (see The Miz).

When it comes down to it, the matches are the most important things in pro wrestling. Every wrestling show will have 4 to 8 wrestling matches and every PPV, the biggest events in wrestling, are composed almost entirely of wrestling matches. The better you are in the ring, the more likely you will be able to excel and be apart of these matches, simple logic.

Wrestling matches are the things that people remember most. When people are asked about their favorite moments in wrestling, not many are going to talk about a promo in their answer. They are much more likely to talk about Hart/Austin or HBK/Taker, moments in wrestling that will go down in history simply because of the in ring work involved.

Without matches and wrestlers capable of putting on good matches, pro wrestling wouldn't exist. Take Japanese wrestling. There is very little promo work involved over there. If you are not a very, very good in ring worker in Japan, it is unlikely you will be successful as a pro wrestler.

There are many pro wrestlers today who rely mainly on their in ring work. AJ Styles, Bryan Danielson, and Jeff Hardy aren't known for their mic work, but they were all able to become the most over and exciting wrestlers in their respective companies. Almost soley on their in ring work, not their mic skills.

In conlusion, being good on the mic is a big plus in pro wrestling, but without being a good in ring worker, you aren't going to get anywhere in pro wrestling.
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post #3 of 3 (permalink) Old 09-17-2009, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Special Attraction Match: Headliner vs adnimbot

Mic skills. And it's not even a contest. Mic skills is what connects the wrestler to the audience. Mic skills is what ultimately decides how over a wrestler will be with the audience.

Chris Benoit was a great worker, but he was never as over as the big time mic workers because he sucked on the mic, and was forced to rely on his wrestling ability each week to stay over. Either that, or he had to hope that he had an opponent that could work the mic so that their feud can go to the next level.

Eddie Guerrero was awesome in WCW. Had awesome matches with numerous cruiser weights, but it wasn't until WWE gave him the mic that he got over that brick wall of popularity that he couldn't get over in WCW.

As a matter of fact, every successful WWE era has been headlined by a great mic worker. Hogan (who is regarded as a terrible ring worker by most), Austin, Rock and now Cena. Why? Because they have been able to connect to the audience in ways that other workers couldn't (Cough, New Generation era). Not only that, but before Austin became Stone Cold, before the Rock became the People's champion, and before Cena became the Champ, they weren't doing much in WWE and they didn't seem to have that much character to them. Once WWE gave each of them the mic, they all blew up. So does it surprise you that these guys are the most over wrestlers in history?

Speaking of character, mic work defines character. Evan Bourne can do all the shooting star presses he wants, but unless they put him on the stick, and he's actually decent on it, he'll never be that over. You can't rely on the announcers putting you over as a high flyer each week. You have to do it yourself. Why do you think Ted Jr's first appearance was him talking on the mic instead of being in the ring? People wanna see what you're about.

This also explains why Miz is so awesome. Because he puts himself over each week to the point where his character is established, and his catchphrase identifies him with the audience. (Oh yea, did I mean that catchphrases are a form of identifying a wrestler? Guys can use the same moves, but nobody will have the same quotes, at least not at the same given time, making each quote designed for that pacific wrestler)

Mic skills is also a marketing tool to help companies advertise and gain revenue. Notice all the catchprases on WWE T-shirts? Yea, most of them come from a wrestler that has said it, and the phrase got over so much that it got on a T-Shirt. Austin 3:16? The Rock's nursey rhymes and even Triple H's angry phrases from the start of this decade. Which means: Mic work=revenue, wrestling moves? not so much.

Ring work has become so minimized in value to the point where the only time you'll see wrestlers do something out of their ordinary routine is during a PPV. Mic work however, is forever and has been used to establish wrestlers from FCW, all the way to the main roster and PPV. Mic work has become the foundation of wrestling.
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