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-   -   Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers (http://www.wrestlingforum.com/classic-wrestling/641264-classic-jobbers-jim-powers.html)

Mike Zybyszko 10-26-2012 01:19 AM

Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
This guy turned up in 1985 or so, and despite having the prototypical physique McMahon wanted, he just lacked charisma and the "it factor" in the ring. He didn't suck, but he didn't dazzle either. According to wikipedia he was trained by Big John Studd.

I used to catch every WWF program in those days as I had a VCR (big time awesome in those days), and set it to timer record all WWF weekly shows in case I forgot or couldn't watch. I stupidly used the same tape over and over again rather than save all the shows. I still regret it. Anyways, Jim Powers was a frequently used jobber in those days. It seems like every week he was getting pinned, put to sleep, or submitting to anyone mid card and above. History of WWE has many listings for Jim Powers jobbing to everyone. Once in a great while they would let him beat another jobber like Jose Louis Rivera, but the vast majority of his time in WWF was spent taking 3 counts. He did get to mount offense unlike the total squash jobbers such as Frankie Williams.

Click here for a bunch of Jim Powers jobber youtube vids

Eventually, he was partnered with another jobber in Paul Roma to form the jobber tag team of The Young Stallions. I remember it seemed like the WWF was going to give these guys a push and make them into midcard talent at least, and they did defeat the jobber team of Barry Horowitz & Brooklyn Brawler as well as get a DQ type win over The Hart Foundation. The WWF even gave them some theme music.







So after these two matches the WWF had sold me on the Young Stallions as a valid tag team, but alas, it was not to be. The Hart Foundation got their revenge on Saturday Night's Main Event.



After this the team of The Young Stallions went back to being mere jobbers and were fed to Demolition many times as well as pretty much all the other top heel tag teams of the day. I can't link a Demolition vs Young Stallions match as youtube has taken them down. Eventually they began to argue and the team disbanded. Powers went back to singles jobbing on a regular basis though Gorilla and Vince would always refer to him as an "up and comer", and that he would be a great wrestler once he matured.

Flash forward to the mid 1990s and Jim Powers turns up in WCW. He continues to job. Even though he is now in his late 30s he is still referred to as a young "up and comer". I guess he really never did hit his peak.

Oh yeah, Jim Powers was one of the few jobbers to get an action figure:


Hotdiggity11 10-26-2012 01:22 AM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Ideal physique for Vince but he was only 5"11. Another 4 inches and Vince woulda made him a main eventer lol.

Mike Zybyszko 10-26-2012 01:24 AM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hotdiggity11 (Post 12184557)
Ideal physique for Vince but he was only 5"11. Another 4 inches and Vince woulda made him a main eventer lol.

Yep, his lack of height definitely put him at a disadvantage.

Greenlawler 10-26-2012 11:58 PM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Zybyszko (Post 12184565)
Yep, his lack of height definitely put him at a disadvantage.

I think once again the WWF pr department struck here. Jim Powers was no way 5'11, maybe 5'9at best. The WWF always added at least 3 inches to everyone, and the wrestlers themselevs believed the WWF pr people. If Jim Powers had been 5'11 it would have put him at a legit height at the time. Many superstars were less than 6'0 including Ric Flair (who I know is not 6'0 tall). I am 6'0 tall and I have towered over many of the supposed 6'0 plus guys billed by wreslting companies in the pictures I have taken over the years.

The deeper question here is what constitutes a jobber? I am not arguing Powers was not a jobber, he was. Although we would all admit he was a little better than your typical jobber because he did score lots of wins here and there in the loaded WWF. Lots of guys we would consider WWF and even WCW jobbers had solid careers in the territories.

I think Jimmy Powers would have been a star in some of the territories early in his career, but by the time he left the WWF his lot was cast because of exposure.

Many "classic jobbers" due to WWF television were really treated as main event wrestlers in and managed to get titles in the territories: Guys like Barry Horowitz was a contender in Florida and Memphis. The Italian Stalion perhaps the ultimate jobber in the 80's NWA held titles in the territories. Len Denton, Tony Anthony, even Iron Mike Sharpe served as little more than jobbers in the "big two" but were all headliners throughout their career.

So there is a difference to me in a classic jobber (and Mike I am agreeing with your threads not disagreeing) and a "glorified jobber" who had a gimmick or music, or a "Big Two" jobber who was a star in other areas.

Elipses Corter 10-27-2012 01:15 AM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Last I heard, Jim Powers was in pretty bad shape. IIRC, he had to have a hip replacement.

Mike Zybyszko 10-27-2012 03:42 AM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Greenlawler (Post 12187917)
I think once again the WWF pr department struck here. Jim Powers was no way 5'11, maybe 5'9at best. The WWF always added at least 3 inches to everyone, and the wrestlers themselevs believed the WWF pr people. If Jim Powers had been 5'11 it would have put him at a legit height at the time. Many superstars were less than 6'0 including Ric Flair (who I know is not 6'0 tall). I am 6'0 tall and I have towered over many of the supposed 6'0 plus guys billed by wreslting companies in the pictures I have taken over the years.

The deeper question here is what constitutes a jobber? I am not arguing Powers was not a jobber, he was. Although we would all admit he was a little better than your typical jobber because he did score lots of wins here and there in the loaded WWF. Lots of guys we would consider WWF and even WCW jobbers had solid careers in the territories.

I think Jimmy Powers would have been a star in some of the territories early in his career, but by the time he left the WWF his lot was cast because of exposure.

Many "classic jobbers" due to WWF television were really treated as main event wrestlers in and managed to get titles in the territories: Guys like Barry Horowitz was a contender in Florida and Memphis. The Italian Stalion perhaps the ultimate jobber in the 80's NWA held titles in the territories. Len Denton, Tony Anthony, even Iron Mike Sharpe served as little more than jobbers in the "big two" but were all headliners throughout their career.

So there is a difference to me in a classic jobber (and Mike I am agreeing with your threads not disagreeing) and a "glorified jobber" who had a gimmick or music, or a "Big Two" jobber who was a star in other areas.

Yeah I agree that his height was fudged by the PR dept. I have been close enough to Paul Roma to notice that I was a bit taller. I'm 5'10" on a good day.

I also agree that Powers would likely have been a small territory or indy champ with his look and overall abilities.

My answer to what constitutes a "classic jobber" are guys who lost 90% or more of their matches in a big promotions and most of the time they lose clean. WCW, AWA, and WWE would be the qualified companies for the jobber label to stick. Lesser companies, and NWA territories that were small compared to JCP are not applicable here in regards to how I am defining a jobber.

I should note that I have three levels of jobber in my view:

1) Squash Jobber - never wins, loses to credible jobbers, and mount no offense.
2) Credible Jobber - beat squash jobbers, but virtually never beat anyone lower mid card on up. they get to mount some offense even against main eventers.
3) Jobber To The Stars - usually an aged star, still beats lower level jobber types, but almost always loses to midcard on up.

Jim Powers would be a Credible Jobber according to my scale.

Greenlawler 10-28-2012 11:23 PM

Re: Classic Jobbers: Jim Powers
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Zybyszko (Post 12188160)
Yeah I agree that his height was fudged by the PR dept. I have been close enough to Paul Roma to notice that I was a bit taller. I'm 5'10" on a good day.

I also agree that Powers would likely have been a small territory or indy champ with his look and overall abilities.

My answer to what constitutes a "classic jobber" are guys who lost 90% or more of their matches in a big promotions and most of the time they lose clean. WCW, AWA, and WWE would be the qualified companies for the jobber label to stick. Lesser companies, and NWA territories that were small compared to JCP are not applicable here in regards to how I am defining a jobber.

I should note that I have three levels of jobber in my view:

1) Squash Jobber - never wins, loses to credible jobbers, and mount no offense.
2) Credible Jobber - beat squash jobbers, but virtually never beat anyone lower mid card on up. they get to mount some offense even against main eventers.
3) Jobber To The Stars - usually an aged star, still beats lower level jobber types, but almost always loses to midcard on up.

Jim Powers would be a Credible Jobber according to my scale.

Very good, I like your scale. Looking forward to further posts.


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