20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer - Page 18 - Wrestling Forum : WWE, TNA, ROH, Wrestling Videos, Women of Wrestling Forums
Reply

Old 06-14-2012, 06:55 PM   #171 (permalink)
GET MY BAGS
 
Rock316AE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 9,460
Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500Rock316AE 15001 - 15500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Dave put one Observer from 98 on all the Montreal SVS 97 accident, other than that, you need to wait 4 years until 99. Unless you got the actual Newsletters or Dave decides to do it in months/years instead of weeks.
Rock316AE is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 06-15-2012, 12:34 PM   #172 (permalink)
Vince gives me a comedy gimmick
 
666_The_Game_666's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6,121
666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokepepsi View Post
Eventually?

5yrs is a long ass time
yeah well he only does them by week so it takes 52 weeks to do a full year. Currently hes in the middle of April 1995
__________________

3 NBA Champion (1981, 1984, 1986)
3 NBA Most Valuable Player (19841986)
12 NBA All-Star (19801988, 19901992)
2 NBA Finals MVP (1984, 1986)
9 All-NBA First Team (19801988)
All-NBA Second Team (1990)
3 NBA All-Defensive Second Team (19821984)
NBA Rookie of the Year (1980)
NBA All-Rookie First Team (1980)
NBA All-Star Game MVP (1982)
3 Three-point Shootout champion (19861988)
21,791 Points
5,695 Assists
8,974 Rebounds
NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

33 Larry "Legend" Bird

Dave Meltzer > You

Follow Me On Twitter:@AirJordanFan93
666_The_Game_666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 07:50 PM   #173 (permalink)
Bad Times Don't Last, But Bad Guys Do!
 
Headliner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 43,229
Headliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on repHeadliner whored out on rep
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

August 12, 1991 Observer Newsletter: Ric Flair heads to World Wrestling Federation

Quote:
Wrestling Observer Newsletter

PO Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228 August 12, 1991

There are going to be several firsts on this weekend's World Wrestling Federation syndicated television shows, dealing with the introduction of Ric Flair. According to Vince McMahon, voice-overs were done Monday afternoon for the shows, with Flair's name mentioned on both Superstars of Wrestling and Wrestling Challenge shows that air this weekend, as World heavyweight champion (the initials NWA or WCW will never be acknowledged for obvious reasons). Flair's world title belt, but not Flair, will be shown in a vignette with Bobby Heenan on both shows.

The interesting firsts are not only is it the first time the WWF will acknowledge and recognize a champion and/or championship from another promotion since 1984 (when Vince McMahon bought Georgia Championship Wrestling, for a brief period of time he recognized Les Thornton as his junior heavyweight champion and The Spoiler as his National heavyweight champion before jobbing them out) but it's the first time it will talk about a wrestler before a deal has been finalized bringing the wrestler to the WWF.

Obviously this is being done because McMahon must be extremely confident that he can cut the deal with Flair on or shortly after Sept. 1, when Flair's WCW contract expires, although actual contract negotiations won't even start until that date for legal reasons. Equally as obvious, by billing Flair as the other world heavyweight champion, that Flair is being set up for a run with Hulk Hogan. Speculation from this end is that the heel wrestlers will refer to Flair as the real world champion while the face wrestlers will refer to Hogan as the real champion provided everything happens as it appears it will. Flair will first be talked about by Heenan, late in the Challenge show on Saturday, who will have Flair's title belt on his shoulder. Heenan will say that the man who owns the belt is Ric Flair and that comparing this belt with Hulk Hogan's is like comparing Ice Cream to Horse Manure.

This past Wednesday, WCW made another last-ditch effort to get Flair back in a meeting with Jack Petrik and Jim Herd at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Atlanta. Both sides signed confidentiality agreements not to discuss any of the contents of the meeting. Sources in WCW believe Flair was offered the job as booker. In fact, many WCW wrestlers and employees expected that Rhodes' days were numbered early in the week. However when Flair apparently turned down whatever offer was made on Wednesday, the rumors of Rhodes' demise as booker subsided.

Since the firing of Ric Flair on 7/1 and the subsequent disastrous Great American Bash pay-per-view show two weeks later, both Herd and Rhodes have come under heavy criticism both in and out of the company and the wrestling community. Herd, who is under contract until January, and Rhodes, whose contract expires in January of 1993, were taking the brunt of the blame for the somewhat disastrous state of the company and for the circumstances of losing Flair before he dropped the title two weeks before a pay-per-view show where Flair himself was the subject of a promotional campaign and the focal point of Turner Home Entertainment-designed commercials for the show.

According to several sources, Petrik, who heads up the wrestling division, had given both Herd and Rhodes two weeks to come up with a written plan of action for the remainder of 1991 that would turn the company's fortunes around. While speculation went wild during the week concerning both men's future, it appears that Petrik won't be making any moves. Those very close to the situation seem to feel that Herd is definitely safe until the end of his contract term. Rhodes has a guaranteed contract, reportedly for $300,000 per year, and would have to have his contract paid off if he were to be dumped, which would require too many explanations within the corporate world to happen easily. Verne and Greg Gagne were in the office this past week, with one story being they were being talked about for positions but the official word is they were there to discuss some kind of syndicated television deal.

Flair is legally unable to make any moves regarding his career until Sept. 1 unless he re-signs with WCW. There was a lot of talk last week, stemming from Flair's appearance at a fans convention in New York the day before Summer Slam and a report by Jim Ross on the WCW Hotline last week, that Flair would make a surprise appearance with the WWF at the Summer Slam PPV show. However, the airline ticket Fan Convention promoter John Arezzi purchased for Flair was for him to leave New York the morning of Summer Slam. One would think there would be legal problems with Flair making an appearance at the Summer Slam show. McMahon said that any discussion of how Flair would be programmed would be premature considering the deal can't be cut until Sept. 1. Other sources are saying that if Flair were to join Titan, and there is obviously enough confidence that he will to talk about him on television, his debut date would be likely be at the mid-September television tapings. The speculation is that Flair and Hogan would work a major house show run in the fall rather than hold off the inevitable match until Wrestlemania next year. This past Saturday, Joel Goodhart strongly hinted that Flair vs. Terry Funk would headline his 9/21 show in Philadelphia. Flair's name was never mentioned directly, but the implication that Funk would wrestle against a champion whose name can't be mentioned for legal reasons until Sept. 1, now let's hear the chant, and the place started with the "We Want Flair" chants and Goodhart closed with Goodhart always delivers. However, those close to Flair indicate that at best, Flair being hinted at for that date is premature speculation and at worst, is highly unlikely (but not impossible) to ever come off.

While all this was taking place, the name Bill Watts began to surface once again. Watts, who was one of pro wrestling's biggest names in the 1960s and 1970s, a successful booker and later headed Mid South Sports, which is generally acknowledged to have produced the best television wrestling shows of the mid-1980s (Its "A" program was awarded Best Television Show in the 1985 and 1986 Observer year-end awards balloting and was named Best Wrestling Promotion in 1986). Mid South Wrestling, which later became known as the Universal Wrestling Federation, was sold to Jim Crockett Promotions in the spring of 1987, which many thought would be the impetus for JCP to challenge the WWF for wrestling supremacy. At the time of the sale, JCP's syndicated television penetration was roughly the same as the WWF and it had a greater talent roster. It had the disadvantage of not being established on a national basis as the WWF already was, not yet in the PPV game and not based in the largest market. But the purchase of Mid South Sports, instead of being the catalyst for Crockett Promotions being a competitive force in wrestling wound up being one of many reasons JCP suffered huge financial losses and was forced to sell in late 1988 to Turner Broadcasting.

In an amazing interview with Wade Keller in the 8/1 issue of the Pro Wrestling Torch newsletter, Watts was open and very outspoken regarding the failure of Turner Broadcasting in the wrestling business. Watts himself is said to believe that the interview virtually guarantees that he'll never be considered to run the company (during the interview Watts said that he didn't think he'd even be considered). Others read the interview as almost a dare by Watts directed at Petrik. By being brutally honest about Petrik, Herd and Rhodes, some read it as the ultimate machismo dare, kind of an "I told the truth, everyone reading this knows I told the truth, you're afraid to deal with the truth and because of it you don't have the guts to hire me because you want a corporate guy who sugar-coats everything." Watts talked about his interview in the spring of 1990 for the booking job (which wound up with the hiring of Ole Anderson), and said, "I told Petrik, `Hell, I wouldn't work for Herd. Hell, he don't know what he's doing. He's an idiot.' Petrik asked, `Why not?' I said, "First of all, if he had any smarts, any balls, I wouldn't be here having this interview with you. Because he should have hired me when he had the chance (referring to Watts' first interview with Herd in the spring of 1989 after George Scott was fired as booker)." Watts said that last year, Petrik offered him a $300,000-per-year deal to be booker, but Watts claimed his response was, "Let's do it this way. I don't need a salary. Let's do it totally on incentives, on how much I cut your losses, how much your ratings go up, I want a piece of action on the television revenue, on pay-per-views. Anything that is an increase. We'll start with your average for this past year and set it and I want increases on everything. If you do movies, tapes, pay-per-views, whatever." Watts said he believed the reason Petrik didn't accept the deal was because he had to make Jim Herd look good since he's the one who hired him. Watts said: "You know Petrik, your problem is it's become a corporate deal where you have to cover your own ass and you don't give a shit because it's not your money they're blowing." On the problems with the Turner regime, he said: "You've got a corporate structure, Turner Broadcasting has turned into a bunch of feudal systems where very head of his division wants to cover his own ass, and here's Jack Petrik, who doesn't know shit about wrestling and he's hired a guy who is a complete idiot. Herd is a kind of guy who is a complete back door artist. He is a corporate animal. He knows every well how to sit there and butter his own bread with his corporate buddy." Watts later said the only way he'd work for TBS is to deal directly with Turner. "Jack Petrik can never hire me because anybody with a brain on his board would go, `Well, you interviewed this guy a year-and-a-half or so ago, why didn't you hire him then?' So Jack Petrik can't hire me because he's already hired two guys in the interim (Anderson and Rhodes), two guys that I told him couldn't do it and that's on record. And he can't do it and won't do it because I've told him the truth, too. They can't live with the truth." For a complete copy of the three-page interview, send $5 for four issues for the Torch at P.O. Box 201844, Minneapolis, MN 55420.

Speaking of amazing, the performance of Cactus Jack this past Saturday night on Joel Goodhart's show in Philadelphia had everyone raving. Jack, who has a return WCW starting date, as a heel to be among a quartet of crazy villains who will be programmed with Sting until the end of the year, planned for tonight in St. Joseph, MO, worked three matches on one show, all against Eddie Gilbert. Gilbert was also scheduled to return tonight to WCW as a face. Despite the crowd being only 562 fans, Jack had said ahead of time that we was going to try and have the best explosive match (falls count anywhere in the building) in history, followed by the best stretcher match and capped off by the best cage match. As far as the best in history goes, that's open to debate, but I guess there's no debating that both Jack and Gilbert weren't willing to do just about everything to make good on that statement. The explosive match went on second in the show, with it mainly consisting of brawling all over Pennsylvania Hall with tables and chairs and garbage cans. Gilbert juiced heavily in the match with them trading hitting one another with whatever wasn't nailed down until Jack pinned Gilbert in 16:13 in a match described as being between 4 1/2 and 4 3/4 stars. That should be enough for a good week's work, since more than one person said it was the best singles match thus far in 1991 in the United States. They came back two matches later for the stretcher match. Among the highlights of this was Cactus coming off the middle rope to the floor with the elbow drop on a garbage can (Gilbert, who was lying on the garbage can, moved) and later dumping the contents of a garbage can out, and Gilbert broke a non-gimmicked white cooler bottle over Jack's head. Both guys juiced heavily in this one as well, which went 9:50 with Gilbert winning when Jack did a stretcher job after the beer bottle incident in a match said to be between 4 3/4 and 5 stars, which might make it again the best singles match in the U.S. this year. A couple of hours later, after many of the fans had already gone home because the show went four-and-a-half hours, they went out to a completely burned out audience and did a cage match. They ended up both getting out of the cage and brawling all over the building once again (by this time, everyone had seen more than enough brawling all over the building and juice). The highlight of this match was Jack standing on the top of the cage, Gilbert dropkicking the cage, Jack crotching himself and then taking a bump backwards from the top of the cage to the arena floor on his back. The actual finish of this match, said to be 3 1/2 stars, held back because the drained crowd had nothing left to react with, was a double disqualification when Doug Gilbert and Bam Bam Bigelow did run-ins which would set up a tag match on the next show provided none of those mentioned were already staring full-time with WCW (Bigelow is also WCW bound).

As a follow-up to recent items about bodybuilder Lou Ferrigno, Titan Sports will announce his signing a two-year deal on Wednesday in a press conference at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. The bidding war between Titan and Joe Weider was said to have reached $700,000 per year according to several newsstand mags and Pumping Press, a British bodybuilding magazine reported the bidding having reached $1 million (McMahon referred to both figures as "completely ridiculous" which I assumed to mean ridiculous on the high side). I don't know if it's coincidental or not that the press conference is being held in the Los Angeles area, since Weider's offices are in Woodland Hills. Ferrigno is scheduled to come out of retirement (his last bodybuilding competition was the 1975 Mr. Olympia contest, since then he's worked as an actor in some B-grade movies and gained his most fame from "The Incredible Hulk" television show on CBS in the late 70s) for McMahon's next WBF championships which will be held in June of 1992. Because of the expense involved in putting on shows of the magnitude of the show this past June, the muscle shows are going to be less frequent than originally announced (the preliminary reports were there would be four shows per year, and now the plan is for no other shows in the U.S. until the show next June although there is a possibility of a show in London in the interim). McMahon denied the report in The Pumping Press that was reported in the Observer last week that his first show had the outcome pre-determined. "It was a complete shoot. I didn't care who won. All were of equal personality to me. I hadn't even met any of the judges before the contest although I knew of Dave Draper (a big-name bodybuilder from the late 60s and early 70s) and Fred Hatfield (a champion powerlifter) by reputation. The Weider organization is doing everything they can to discredit us." He also said one of the reasons the show went so long live is because it took the judges forever to come up with their decision. As far as it apparently being no secret beforehand about Gary Strydom and Mike Christian being 1-2 (Two days before the show it was somewhat common knowledge among bodybuilding insiders), McMahon said it was clear to everyone who saw the dress rehearsal several days before the event that Strydom was going to win because he was so much better than everyone else that even Mike Christian knew (although the legitimacy of the contest was questioned, all reports from the show indicated Strydom should have been a clear-cut winner).

McMahon's long-term plan to market his bodybuilders as mainstream personalities seems to involve giving them larger-than-life exaggerated and unique personalities. The personalities will be presented on a television show, scheduled for a January start date, which in theory would get the guys over as television stars and celebrities similar to his wrestling television shows. The show wouldn't be a weekly muscle show, such as appears on ESPN as McMahon said that strictly watching bodybuilders flex, except for the hardcore muscle fan, is "as boring as watching paint dry." No idea what the concept will be other than the idea of the show will be to get the personalities of the bodybuilders over as ambassadors of healthy living. He admitted that getting the bodybuilders off steroids will be even more difficult than wrestlers because of their advanced sophistication in their applications, even so far as to say it may take a few years. He even went so far as to say he wants to change the judging criteria for bodybuilders (the re-education process we've spoken of) where it wouldn't reward the steroided-out look. "The natural look will be easier for the mainstream to relate to. We're going to change the judging gradually and we're going in a different direction (than the Weider organization)."

Just a quick note because a few readers, who frequently travel, have asked about cities where wrestling runs under a normal weekly schedule. WCW and WWF, of course, run shows all over the country with no regular schedule as to where and when. The companies that still run weekly shows are the USWA, GWF and Owen Promotions in Oregon. The USWA runs weekly television tapings at WMC-TV Studios in Memphis every Saturday morning, plus weekly house shows on Saturday nights in Nashville, Monday nights in Memphis, Tuesday in Louisville and Wednesday in Evansville. GWF runs every Friday night at the Dallas Sportatorium and also on alternate Saturday's. Owen Promotions runs every Saturday night at the Portland Sports Arena, and I believe most Thursday nights in Salem and Friday's in Eugene.

This is the second issue of the current four-issue set of Observers. If you've got a (1) on your address label, it means your subscription expires in two weeks. Renewal rates in the U.S. and Canada are $6 for each set of four issues, $12 for eight, $24 for 16, $36 for 24, $48 for 32 up through $60 for 40 issues. Rates anywhere else in the world, for overseas airmail delivery is $9 for each set of four issues through $90 for 40 issues. Copies of the 110-page Observer yearbook are still available for $12 within the U.S. and Canada and $18 overseas. All newsletter or book orders, along with letters to the editor, match results, news items and any other correspondence should be sent to the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228.

EMLL

The 8/2 card at Arena Coliseo in Mexico City saw Tony Arce & Vulcano & Bestia Salvaje win 2/3 falls from Volador & Misterioso & Huracan Seville in 23:11 ***, Angel Blanco Jr. & Gran Markus Jr. & Medico Asesino Jr. won 2/3 falls from Pirata Morgan & Ringo Mendoza & Dandy in 19:32 **, in a midget mask vs. hair match, Mascarita Sagrada won 2/3 falls from Piratita Morgan **1/2 (The "real" Pirata Morgan, who is a face, seconded the midget, who is a heel, and Pirata protested his namesake's loss and it at least looked like it was a heel turn) and the main event saw Blue Panther & Javier Cruz & Emilio Charles Jr. win 2/3 falls from Octagon & Apollo Dantes & Atlantis when Panther made Atlantis submit in the third fall. Dantes and Cruz is currently the hottest feud in the company while it appears Panther is being groomed for a shot at Atlantis' NWA middleweight title.

Maybe the biggest news here stems from negative publicity in a one of the major supermarket tabloids. One of the tabloids had as its cover story in this week's issue claims from an unidentified individual that Octagon (who is considered a product of the new television version of wrestling in Mexico City) made homosexual advances toward him. Octagon was for a long time the hottest wrestler in this promotion by leaps and bounds but his popularity in recent weeks has quickly floundered, dropping from No. 1 to No. 8 in quantity of fan mail and some are already writing him off as simply a flash-in-the-pan created by television. The publicity was taken serious enough that in the 8/13 issue of Custodia, had a front page denial of the story in huge headlines, "Octagon no es homosexual!!" (meaning Octagon is not a homosexual) with denials from Antonio Pena (head of the CMLL), Juan Herrera (of the EMLL office), Vicky Palacios (the Queen of Lucha Libre), wrestler Pierroth Jr. and a spokesman for the movie studio that Octagon's recent movies were filmed at.

7/27 in San Luis Potosi saw Tony Arce & Vulcano keep the Mexican tag team titles beating Cachorro Mendoza & Solar II.

7/30 in San Martin Toxmelucan saw Octagon keep the Mexican middleweight title winning 2/3 falls from Satanico.

7/31 in Mexico City saw Octagon & Dandy & Villano IV beat Kung Fu & Fuerza Guerrera (already back from the auto accident of last week) & Caballo Loco in straight falls with the second falling coming via DQ when Loco unmasked Octagon to set up a singles match for next week and they may be building to a mask vs. mask match down the road.

Javier Cruz won a hair vs. hair match from Javier Valaguez on 8/1 in Cuernavaca.

8/1 in Mexico City had Super Astro & Dandy & Chavo Guerrero vs. Charles & Jerry Estrada & Guerrera.

8/4 in Mexico City had a 17 women's Battle Royal.

Canadian Vampire Casanova, who is the group's most popular wrestler based on fan mail, is 24-years-old and grew up in Montreal but wrestled maybe three or four matches total in Canada before debuting in Mexico in February.

Apparently all the top EMLL guys will be working on 8/30 in Tijuana (near San Diego).

UWA

7/28 at El Toreo in Naucalpan saw Mil Mascaras keep his IWA world heavyweight title (the same title from the old Eddie Einhorn promotion in the United States from the 1970s) winning 2/3 falls from The Killer, El Signo & Black Power & Negro Navarro won a non-title match over UWA trios champions Los Villanos with two of the three Villanos juicing, Canek & Baby Face Sr. & Dr. Wagner Jr. won 2/3 falls from Enrique Vera & Dos Caras & Akiyoshi and Los Temerarios (Shu El Guerrero & Jose Luis Feliciano & Black Terry) drew with Yoshihiro Asai & Samurai (Osamu Matsuda) & Fantasma.

7/27 in Cuernavaca saw Vera keep his UWA junior heavyweight title beating Wagner Jr.

Villanos had a trios defense on 7/29 in Puebla against Fishman & Dr. Wagner Jr. & Black Power.

8/1 at Arena Pista Revolucion in Mexico City had Villanos in non-title against Black Power & Signo & Navarro plus Asai & Gran Hamada & Silver King vs. El Indomito & El Engendro & Negro Casas.

8/2 in Netzahualtcoytol had Dos Caras & Hamada & Villano III vs. Rambo & Casas & Wagner, Vera & Villano V vs. Black Power & Signo and Asai & Silver King & Fantasma vs. Pimpinela Escarlata & May Flowers & Rudy Reyna.

8/11 at El Toreo has Villanos defending against Signo & Black Power & Navarro.

A mask vs. mask match with Los Villanos vs. The Mercenaries (usually Billy Anderson & Louie Spicoli and someone else) drew a sellout house (4,000 fans) on 7/19 in Tijuana plus El Hijo Del Santo, Perro Aguayo and Negro Casas worked the undercard.

This group's ratings as of 8/1 were: HEAVYWEIGHT (Canek champion): 1. Dos Caras; 2. Vader; 3. Kokina; 4. Buffalo Allen (Badnews Brown); 5. Gigante Guerrero (Butch Masters); 6. Mascaras; 7. Tinieblas Sr; 8. Scorpio; 9. Fishman; 10. Fatu; JUNIOR HEAVYWEIGHT (Vera champion): 1. El Engendro; 2. Killer; 3. Wagner Jr.; 4. Miguelito Perez; 5. Rambo; 6. Fantasma; 7. El Egipicio; 8. Hurricane Castillo Jr.; 9. Naoki Sano; 10. Tinieblas Jr.; LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT (Villano III champion): 1. Pegasus Kid; 2. Rambo; 3. Signo; 4. Villano V; 5. Villano IV; 6. Texano; 7. Owen Hart; 8. El Indomito; 9. Villano I; 10. Baby Face; JUNIOR LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT (Perro Aguayo champion): 1. Silver King; 2. Solar I; 3. Blue Panther; 4. Mascara Sagrada; 5. Indomito; 6. Engendro; 7. La Fiera; 8. Feliciano; 9. Hamada; 10. Kato Kung Lee II; MIDDLEWEIGHT (Casas champion): 1. Asai; 2. Blue Demon Jr.; 3. Octagon; 4. Falcon; 5. Halcon 78; 6. Charles; 7. Angel Azteca; 8. Eddie Guerrero; 9. Amigo Ultra; 10. Super Raton; WELTERWEIGHT (Santo champion); 1. Ruben Garcia; 2. El Hijo del Diablo; 3. Black Terry; 4. Zeus; 5. Guerrera; 6. Espanto Jr.; 7. Ciclon Ramirez; 8. Fama; 9. Felino; 19. Volador.

JAPAN

Basically a slow week this time around.

New Japan has already sold out the second and third nights of the three nights in Tokyo's Sumo Hall scheduled from 8/9 to 8/11. I believe tickets in the 11,500 seat building were priced from $22 to $72 so you're talking three of the biggest houses of the year since the first night only had a few tickets left as of early this week and it was expected it'll be sold out well before match time as well.

No word on the SWS show on 8/9 at the Yokohama Arena with the Road Warriors and the Tokyo area return of Ashura Hara, which has actually been the biggest news in the magazines of late.

Akira Maeda's Rings ran its second show on 8/1 in Osaka's Furitsu Gym drawing 6,100 (building sells out at 7,000) with Maeda doing a job in the main event losing to Dirk Leon-Vri via TKO in 8:01. Since Maeda has such a small amount of potential foes to work with, it appears he believes he has to do jobs on a regular basis to keep interest alive. A few days before the match, Maeda sent telegrams to all the major magazines that he had torn knee ligaments (no doubt a work sent to give a prior excuse for him doing the job) in training for the match. Willie Wilhelm (6-6, 300), former European champ in judo beat Peter Smit in the semifinal. Wilhelm, whose match with Maeda drew 60,000 fans to the Tokyo Dome in 1989, main events against Maeda on 9/3 in Sapporo. Nobuhiko Takada's UWFI runs 9/26 in Sapporo while Yoshiaki Fujiwara's PWF runs 8/23 in Sapporo, so all three UWF-style promotions are running shows in the same city within a five-week period.

UWFI drew a sellout 2,000 fans at the Hakata Star Lanes on 7/30 with Yoji Anjyo & Jim Boss (indie worker from Tennessee) beating Takada & Kiyoshi Tamura in 31:02 in the main event, plus Kazuo Yamazaki beat Billy Scott (indie worker from Nashville area) with a facelock submission and Shigeo Miyato beat Tatsuo Nakano.

Hara's return after being fired by All Japan for gambling problems a few years back took place on 8/4 in Nagaoka before a full house of 2,000 as Genichiro Tenryu & Takashi Ishikawa beat Hara & Samson Fuyuki in the main event.

Maeda announced he would be running a show in December at the Ariake Coliseum in Tokyo Bay which is the same building where he sold out all 12,000 seats the first few hours tickets went on sale in 1989 when he was the hottest draw in wrestling.

Akira Hokuto is forming a tag team with Bull Nakano in the All Japan women rings to feud with tag team champions Aja Kong & Bison Kimura.

Record, one of the leading mainstream sports magazines in Japan reprinted the Sports Illustrated item on the Zahorian case this past week which was the first real mainstream acknowledgement of the story in Japan. Weekly Gong never covered the story while Weekly Pro Wrestling published by Baseball Magazine Sha just touched on it many weeks ago. Weekly Fight, however, ran a three-page story on the trial mainly with news gathered from issues of the Observer.

New Japan ran a special show on 8/1 in Shimonoseki, which is Memorial Day in Japan, with free admission on the beach and drew an estimated 20,000 fans to see Jushin Liger win a 12 man Battle Royal by pinning Hiroshi Hase in 19:56 and the first singles meeting in many years between Keiji Muto and Liger ended with Muto winning plus Shiro Koshinaka & Masa Chono beat Hase & Kensuke Sasaki.

FMW was the only group running a regular schedule this pat week. 7/30 in Nara drew 2,155 as Tarzan Goto beat Ricky Fuji in a no rope barbed wire match when the ref stopped it and Atsushi Onita & Sambo Asako beat Horace Boulder & The Gladiator. 7/31 in Fukui drew 1,624 as Gladiator & Goto beat Onita & Fuji and 8/1 in Yokkaichi drew 2,254 as Onita & Kim Chu Hwan beat Gladiator & Boulder in a street fight. It is expected that Onita vs. Goto singles match, with talk being that the loser must retire from wrestling, will take place later this month at the 30,000-seat Kawasaki Baseball Stadium.

Fujiwara's 7/26 show at NK Hall in the Tokyo Bay Area was said to be very good, particularly Wayne Shamrock (Vince Tirelli) vs. Duane Koslowski (only in his second pro match). Koslowski, who lives in Minnesota and represented the U.S. in Greco-roman at the last Olympic games, was said to have really learned the style while Shamrock is generally considered the best at the style of the foreigners.

Another amateur wrestling great, Greg Wojeichowski who won something like 11 AAU Greco-Roman championships in the 70s through early 80s and then turned pro in Indiana as the Great Wojo, debuts this week for newly-formed WING promotion. The promotion wanted to push him, because he's a legit shooter, as another Roland Bock (a legit powerhouse shooter from Europe who feuded with Antonio Inoki in the early 80s) or Billy Robinson type but it doesn't appear Wojo, who is in his early 40s and has a job as a wrestling coach, wants to regularly work in Japan. WING put tickets on sale this week for its opener on 8/17 at Korakuen Hall with ringside at $37 and all others at $22 which is inexpensive for that building. All Japan and All Japan Women both have shows the next day in the same building.

Reggie Bennett continues to get a lot of mainstream publicity from her television commercial for an energy drink.

Debbie Malenko and Esther Moreno will be going home at the end of August for one month. Malenko gets her first big show main event on 8/29 in Osaka teaming with Kyoko Inoue against Kong & Kimura.

All Japan television on 7/28 headlined by Jumbo Tsuruta vs. Steve Williams drew a 4.1 Video Research and 4.7 Neilsen rating which is again great for its Sunday 12:30 a.m. to 1:30 time slot. New Japan on 7/27 had a ten-man tag match with TNT & Bam Bam Bigelow & Big Van Vader & The Samoans (Kokina & Samu) vs. Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami & Muto & Chono & Shinya Hashimoto which drew a 6.6 VR and 5.1 Neilsen which is just fair for a Saturday afternoon slot.

Jim Brunzell and Johnny Ace were added to the next All Japan tour which starts 8/17.

JAPANESE TV RUNDOWN

7/27, NEW JAPAN: 1. Hase & Sasaki beat The Mad Bull Busters (American Bulldogs from New Jersey) when Sasaki pinned Rex with a powerslam. Bull Busters weren't bad at all, particularly considering their experience level. Of course, working with Hase & Sasaki doesn't hurt at all. **3/4; They ran an angle on television where heel Masanobu Kurisu tried to attack former wrestler Kotetsu Yamamoto (who wrestled from 1963 to 1980 and is now a key figure in the front office and television color commentator). The place was going nuts for Yamamoto; 2. Kim Duk & Tiger Jeet Singh beat Super Strong Machine & Tatsutoshi Goto in 11:32 when Singh beat Goto with the cobra claw. Kurisu and Yamamoto had words and a near brawl at ringside again. Singh used a beer bottle as a gimmick. Duk is a lot better now than he was a few years back in the WWF as Tiger Chung Lee, but that isn't saying that he's any good. But he works hard, however Singh is just awful but he's a legend so he's over. After the match Hiro Saito and Norio Honaga attacked Duk & Singh and Kurisu came in as well and they brawled with chairs *1/4; 3. Choshu & Muto & Hashimoto & Chono & Fujinami won 2/3 falls from TNT & Bigelow & Vader & Samoans. The match opened really hot with the Americans making the Japanese look good but putting them over in one hot spot after another. Vader went up for a suplex from Fujinami while Kokina (who must weigh around 470) went for a slam by Choshu. Muto was just unbelievable the entire match. Kokina pinned Chono in 8:26 with a big splash for the first fall. Chono pinned TNT with a flying shoulderblock in 6:18 for the second fall. Third fall saw Hashimoto pin Samu with the DDT in 3:12. There were a lot of really good moves, but it wasn't a dramatic or super intense match. ***1/2

GLOBAL

8/2 at the Dallas Sportatorium drew 871 (779 paid) as The California Stud & John Tatum beat Terry Garvin & Chaz (hot opener), Gary Young beat Cactus Jack via count out (another good match), Soul Taker (Chuck Wright) pinned Terry Daniels, Paul Bunyan beat Super Dave & Super Bad (Skip Young with a mask), The Patriot pinned Tom Davis (Tom Burton), Handsome Stranger beat Kenny the Stinger, Chris Walker & Steve Simpson beat California Stud & Tatum via DQ (good), Steve Cox & Steve Dane beat Soul Taker & Kenny the Stinger via DQ, Scotty Anthony (Scotty the Body) beat Chaz, Bunyan beat Ed Robinson & El Diablo, Walker & Simpson beat Mike & Tom Davis, Stranger pinned Bill Irwin, Tatum beat Barry Usher and Patriot beat Cactus Jack by pinning Scotty Anthony who interfered (best match on the show).

This coming weekend is the two-night North American title tournament with Rick Rude, Patriot, Terry Gordy, Kendo Nagasaki, Brian Lee, Irwin, Young, Cactus, Randy Rhodes, Tatum, Stranger, Al Perez, Soul Taker, Jeff Gaylord, Demolition Ax, Stud, Billy Jack Haynes, Cox, Stan Lane, Austin Idol, Anthony, Badnews Brown and Jim Brunzell plus one or two others. It should be the best drawing weekend thus far for the group.

After seeing the lightheavyweight tournament on ESPN this past week, I really wasn't impressed. To me, for this division to get over like it does in Japan, the wrestlers need to work a different style and do things the bigger guys can't. It seemed more like watching typical wrestlers, just some were a little smaller than one usually sees, but with the exception of Lightning Kid, there was nothing to distinguish it from a typical independent group calibre wrestling show. Kid definitely has his strong points, but is so different from what fans are educated that a wrestler is supposed to look like that the odds are against him. Actually he seems like a typical Japanese prelim wrestler, which in some ways does make him a standout because he wrestles the Japanese style a lot.

USWA

Awesome Kong captured the USWA title from Jerry Lawler on 7/29 in Memphis before about 850 fans on the final card, at least for now, at the Pipkin Building. The big news is that Jarrett Promotions and the Mid South Coliseum have settled their problems and Jarrett returned to the building on 8/5. Coliseum management apparently figured out how much revenue they were losing annually and the regular WCW appearances to take up the slack of losing USWA didn't materialize. The remainder of the card saw Jeff Jarrett & Robert Fuller keep the USWA tag team titles beating The Bar Room Brawlers (Doug Vines & Jeff Sword) in a match where the losing team had to split up, Tom Prichard & Eric Embry & Miss Texas went to a no contest with Tony Anthony & Cousin Harold & Dirty White Girl, Referee Paul Nabors beat Tojo Yamamoto, Bill Dundee beat Randy Harris and Danny Davis kept the lightheavyweight title beating Brian Christopher.

They showed a TV video like a movie scene where a woman's car wouldn't start and she went up to a house for help but it was Leatherface's house. Leatherface chased her with his chainsaw into her car, but her car started. Then Leatherface had a match and after winning went after the jobber with a chainsaw but Embry and Prichard pulled him away.

A new feud is between Davis and Dundee for the lightheavyweight title with Dundee apparently on the road to turning heel. The two were scheduled to wrestle at the Coliseum, but had a television tag match as partners. Davis and Dundee first did an interview with Davis saying how they'll go into the ring as friends, wrestle scientifically and leave as friends. Dundee started laughing and said that you won't be saying that in three weeks because I'm going to do anything I can to get the title. When the two started arguing, Dundee told Davis that he was kissing up to the fans. The two ended up brawling and wrestling with one another and had a good match which kept going until they cut for a commercial and when they came back Davis insinuated that he chased Dundee away.

The 8/5 Mid South Coliseum show has Embry vs. Harold in a hair vs. hair match for the Southern title, Lawler vs. Leatherface in a hair vs. mask match, White Boy & White Girl vs. Prichard & Texas in a street fight which goes on until one member of the team is left in their underwear, Jarrett vs. Brawler #1 in a loser leaves town match, Fuller vs. Brawler #2 in a loser leaves town match (At least one of the two must have had a premonition about what was going to happen because I believe Sword missed this shot and instead worked as a TV jobber on the WCW television taping in St. Joseph), Awesome Kong vs. Samson (no idea who, it was supposed to have been a title match against Eddie Gilbert but Eddie missed television and decided not to return), Davis vs. Dundee for the lightheavyweight title and Harris vs. Christopher.

OREGON

The 8/3 card at the Portland Sports Arena saw John Rambo beat The Grappler, Don Harris beat Mike Winner, Jimmy Jack Funk beat Larry Oliver, Mike Miller beat Dirty White Boy Bobby Blair, Bart Sawyer over Doug Masters, Steve Doll drew with Ron Harris and the main event saw Sandy Barr & Jimmy Jack Funk (father-and-son duo) beat Al Madril & Masters.

AUSTRIA

Foreign wrestlers currently in Otto Wanz' Vienna Cup tournament which ends on 8/27 are Takayuki Iizuka, Chris Benoit, Dynamite Smitt (Johnny Smith), The Barbarian (Equalizer from Oregon), Buffalo Patterson (Darryl Peterson aka Max Pain) and Joe Cruze (replacing Terry Funk who had to cancel the tour due to his back injury). The big show of the tour will be 8/18 with Big Van Vader being brought in to try and regain his CWA (Catch Wrestling Association) world heavyweight title from Rambo (Luc Poirer). In order to up attendance, Wanz came out of retirement for the 562nd time to feud with Patterson. Patterson also had a dressing room brawl with Eddy Steinblock and injured his leg and it resulted in Steinblock being out of action. I'm not sure if that was a work to build up a grudge or not, but will have to assume that was the case.

8/3 in Vienna saw Barbarian beat David Taylor (England) via DQ, Steve Wright beat Klaus Kauroff, Rambo beat Cruz, Benoit & Tony St. Clair DDQ David Finlay & Smitt and Wanz pinned Patterson. 8/4 in Vienna saw Rambo win a Battle Royal, Rambo beat Kauroff, Benoit bet Cruz, Wright drew Finlay and Col. Brody & Smitt beat Franz Schumann & Taylor via DQ.

Miles Zrno of Yugoslavia left the tour because of the Civil War in his homeland.

HERE AND THERE

Complete results from Joel Goodhart's indie show on 8/3 at Pennsylvania Hall in Philadelphia before 562 fans saw The Sandman beat Rockin Rebel 3/4*, Cactus Jack beat Eddie Gilbert in an explosive match ****1/2, Luna Vachon beat Madusa Miceli via DQ in a match where Luna juiced **3/4, Gilbert beat Jack in a stretcher match *****, Crybaby Waldo won a handicap match DUD, Austin Idol DDQ Buddy Landel in a match which was strictly a brawl all over the building using all kinds of furniture as weapons ****, The Fantastics (Tommy Rogers & Bobby Fulton) beat Stan Lane & Jim Cornette when Fulton pinned Cornette when Cornette's attempt to throw powder backfired ***1/2, D.C. Drake & Johnny Hot Body & Larry Winters won an elimination tag team match from J.T. Smith & Tony Stetson & C.N. Redd that lasted 35 minutes and seemed like it would never end DUD (all the TWA titles were at stake here so when Smith beat Drake to win the second fall, Smith became the new TWA champion), and Jack DDQ Gilbert in a cage match ***1/2. Goodhart announced for 9/21 the insinuation of a Ric Flair-Terry Funk main event which seems to be unlikely, Madusa vs. Luna in a hair vs. hair match, Eddie & Doug Gilbert vs. Bam Bam Bigelow & Jack (not a definite but it seemed like that it what the cage match set up), The Sheik vs. Abdullah the Butcher in a barbed wire match and Owen Hart vs. Takayuki Iizuka. Goodhart also announced that Keiji Muto and Jushin Liger would be working for him before the year is out, but I'm pretty skeptical about that since New Japan has a working relationship with WCW and is about to send Hiroshi Hase & Kensuke Sasaki in full-time and Muto and Liger in for brief tours before the year is over.

The Wrestling Classics pay-per-view which will run on Request TV throughout the month of September for $6.95. Also, the company that did the Wrestling Classics videos will release two more volumes at the end of September.

A quick note about the Bowdren the Booker column. Because of all the wrestling news, particularly the Zahorian trial and its fallout and Ric Flair's leaving WCW, we've gotten backlogged like crazy on both Bowdren the Booker and the letters pages. At one point we were backlogged something like 15 pages of letters alone (most of which were timely and couldn't be printed simply because of a lack of space). So it's not like Bowdren hasn't booked his ideas on a weekly basis but just that we've had a lot more wrestling news to cover each week than one would anticipate for this time of the year.

Apollo Sports is running weekly wrestling shows at La Fogata Dance Hall at 16133 N. Atlantic Ave. in Long Beach each Wednesday night with Lucha Libre style. Kurt Brown, who does the Viva La Lucha newsletter worked a prelim match recently.

Boris Malenko's UWF drew 200 on 8/3 in Auburndale, FL with Big V beating Southern champ Outlaw Cody Wales via DQ in the main event.

George South promoted a show on 8/3 in Bluefield, WV with himself as junior heavyweight champ plus Wahoo McDaniel and Italian Stallion as Southern heavyweight champion.

Nikolai Volkoff beat Sonny Blaze to headline a show 8/2 in Elmyra, NY which also included Johnny Rodz.

Ricky Johnson promoted three shows in small Ontario towns drawing between 300 and 600 fans using himself, Johnny K-9, Abdullah Farouk Jr. as a manager and Jason Sterling.

Wild West Wrestling drew 150 fans on 7/26 in Aurora, NE as part of the Hamilton County Fair with Johnny Mantell, Kenny the Stinger, Sweet Daddy Falcone and the main event saw Gary Allbright (who attended the nearby University of Nebraska and placed four times in the NCAA tournament) beat Gary Young.

Dan Reilly and Tom Burke's Wrestling Radio show on WNNZ in Springfield, MA Saturday Noon-1 p.m. will have Owen Hart as a guest this Saturday (8/10) and David Sammartino the final Saturday.

Maritimes Championship Wrestling in New Brunswick, Canada is running seven shows per week, generally drawing 250 to 300 fans per night with Bobby Blaze, Rico Fredrico (Malenko trainees), Ron Starr, Eddie Watts and Goldie Rogers as the heel contingent.

South Atlantic Pro Wrestling on 8/1 in Albemarle, NC saw Jeff Kuster beat Trent Knight, Rikki Nelson (junior heavyweight champion) drew Rob Zakowski, Tommy Seabolt & Tommy Angel beat Storm Troopers via DQ, Wahoo McDaniel double count out with Manny Fernandez (who is basically running the operation) and SAPW champ Chris Chavis beat Vince Tirelli via DQ. 8/2 in Monroe, NC saw Brad Anderson beat Husketer, Nelson beat Ricky Starr, Seabolt & Angel beat Storm troopers, Chavis beat Tirelli and McDaniel DDQ Fernandez. They did TV taping in Concord, NC on 8/3 using Bob Caudle as the announcer with the house pretty packed with the name names being put over. Greg Price has given up his Carolina Championship Wrestling promotion to book towns for this group which had 18 towns booked during the month of August, all in small towns at mainly National Guard Armories.

In some newspaper ads, Mario Savoldi's IWCCW wrestling is calling itself a division of the World Wrestling Federation.

New England Wrestling Federation on 9/27 in Burlington, VT has a show with Abdullah the Butcher vs. The Sheik, Paul Bunyan in a handicap match plus Rick Rude and Bam Bam Bigelow will appear.

Frank Sisson will start promoting weekly shows at the Silver Dollar Action Centre in Calgary in September.

Chris Benoit is working in Europe now until December, at which point he'll probably join Global.

WCW

Tons of news starting with syndicated television tapings (for the weekends of 8/24 and 8/31) on 8/5 in St. Joseph, MO before a packed house of 3,249 fans. In a dark match, Terrence Taylor & Richard Morton beat Dustin Rhodes & Robert Gibson when the heels used the computer on Gibson, then for World Wide Wrestling, Ron Simmons won a squash match and issued a challenge to Lex Luger. Luger came out with Mr. Hughes and Harley Race and they triple-teamed Simmons until Barry Windham (now a full-fledged babyface) made the save. When Simmons asked Windham why, Windham said he's been around a long time and is not going to let guys get away with that kind of stuff. So who has the bounty out on Yellow Dog now??? Later Windham was jumped by the same threesome and Simmons made the save for him. The Patriots (Chip the Firebreaker aka Curtis Thompson & Todd Champion doing a military gimmick) debuted and were given a big push but didn't get any great reaction. Kevin Nash was back as Oz and the people hated it worse every time he came out. Between all the grandiose set designs and all the talk and work that went into the gimmick, it has to be the biggest flop gimmick of the year. It's okay when something flops, but in this case, it isn't, because it's flopped so many times that it's past time to cut losses, but since so much money was spent, I guess they have to keep pushing it to try and justify the expenditure. They could have saved themselves a lot of money by asking anyone who is a fan what they thought of the idea before they went and spent all that money because this had flop written all over it before it escaped from the egg (a new terminology for bad gimmicks). Rick Steiner & Bill Kazmaeir worked as a tag team with Kaz doing most of the work, if you can call it that, since Steiner still has a bad elbow. Morton beat Johnny Rich to advance in the lightheavyweight title tournament as did Brad Street by beating Joey Maggs. Putting established TV jobbers in the tournament should do wonders for the credibility of the new title. Dustin Rhodes & Big Josh & Tom Zenk won the 6-man titles beating The three Freebirds when Zenk pinned Brad. Johnny B. Badd worked as a full-fledged face without ever even turning. Patriots beat Arn Anderson & Larry Zbyszko via DQ. Then a big white box was brought to the ring as a present for Sting. Sting opened the big box and out of the box came Abdullah the Butcher who attacked Sting. WCW Pro saw P.N. News rap to a lackluster reaction (the gimmick is rapidly running out of steam), Rhodes beat Porkchop Cash, Simmons beat Anderson in a very good match, Patriots beat Freebirds in a non-title match to set up title matches at house shows in September, Kazmaeir beat Rip Rogers and Taylor beat Gibson when Morton DDT'd Gibson behind the refs back. Dark match main events saw Sting beat Nikita Koloff via count out in a death match and Steiner & Kazmaeir beat Hard Liners in a terrible cage match since Kaz was in most of the way when Steiner pinned Dick Murdoch. Advertised Bobby Eaton vs. Austin never took place (Eaton got the night off to take his driving test) while Young Pistols, One Man Gang and Black Blood didn't appear as advertised.

Eddie Gilbert was scheduled to debut at the tapings but no-showed because he was unhappy about his babyface role. Gilbert was originally scheduled to wrestle Morton in the lightheavyweight tournament semifinals at the Clash in Cleveland on 9/5. Cactus Jack was there and didn't wrestle. Bam Bam Bigelow is supposed to start at tapings either this week or next.

Van Hammer is supposed to come in down the line as a headbanger gimmick.

Diamond Dallas Page and Diamond Studd will be on HBO's Sports Monster show late this month.

Tommy Rich was arrested this past Thursday night in Troup County in Georgia when the car that he was a passenger in was pulled over and the officers smelled marijuana and Rich admitted it was his and was charged with possession and faces an 8/29 hearing.

Jim Cornette sent a funeral wreath to Jim Herd at the WCW offices in Atlanta as sympathy for killing the promotion. Herd was said to have laughed it off.

The Clash show has been revamped without the Georgia Red Clay match and the Luger-Zenk main event has been dropped. Only matches I know of are Dustin Rhodes & Bobby Eaton vs. Taylor & Austin, Steiner & Kazmaeir vs. Anderson & Zbyszko in the finals of the tag team tournament and the two lightheavyweight tournament semifinals, one of which is tentatively scheduled as Pillman (without the Yellow Dog get-up) vs. Brad Street which is at least on paper a hot action match. The tentative main event right now is Simmons vs. Diamond Studd with the winner getting a title shot at Luger at the Halloween Havoc PPV show from Chattanooga. I believe there will also be a test of strength angle with Koloff vs. Kazmaieir.

Apparently several wrestlers (said to be 15 to 19) will be let go as of the end of the Bash tour, although no surprises on the list. Mostly names like Angel of Death and Sam Houston, that nobody really knew were even around to begin with. The biggest names in jeopardy of being gone are JFD and Robert Gibson.

There will be War Games matches this month in Jacksonville and Greensboro.

WCW has worked out a deal with Marvel Comics to have a WCW wrestling comic book starting in the fall.

TV ratings were poor last week with WCW doing a 2.3 on 7/27 with Yellow Dog vs. Diamond Studd, Freebirds vs. Hard Liners and Taylor vs. Badd while Main Event on 7/28 did a 2.0 with Pistols vs. Freebirds elimination match and Simmons vs. Studd while Power Hour did a 1.6.

According to the Wrestling Hotline, the Freebirds may be dumping their manager, Missy Hyatt will be doing a "Missy Does Mail" segment on the Power Hour. Cute name. Missy Does Mail. Now what is that supposed to remind you of? Luckily I never saw that movie so I have absolutely no idea.

They will be taping segments on Ron Simmons training at Florida State University to prepare for his upcoming matches with Luger.

Dennis Brent on the 900 number said that WCW would be testing for steroids the next time they had a drug test but I don't believe any policy decisions on the subject have been made. Brent brought up the subject to say that if you see wrestlers in any organization getting smaller, don't jeer them but applaud them because they and the wrestling business are better for it.

8/2 in St. Louis drew 1,400 as Eaton drew Austin, JFD & Yellow Dog & News beat Badd & Black Bart & Studd, Rhodes & Josh beat Anderson & Zbyszko via DQ, Luger pinned Windham when Race posted Windham and threw him into the ring and then scooped is leg off the rope as Barry got his foot over the rope as the pin was counted, Morton pinned Gibson when Taylor interfered, Freebirds beat Pistols, Sting beat Koloff via count out in a death match and Simmons & El Gigante beat Hard Liners in a terrible cage match.

8/3 in Kansas City drew 2,200 as JFD pinned Bart, Studd pinned Zenk, Badd pinned News, Freebirds beat Pistols, Austin pinned Josh, Rhodes & Gibson beat Taylor & Morton (best match on the card) when Rhodes pinned Taylor, Windham beat Yellow Dog (good match), Sting beat Koloff via count out in a death match, Eaton & Gigante beat Hard Lines in a cage match (terrible) and Luger pinned Simmons when Race interfered behind the refs back and kneedropped Simmons (good match).

8/4 in Topeka drew 1,800 as News beat Badd via DQ when Teddy Long interfered, Studd pinned Zenk, Freebirds beat Pistols (very good match), Rhodes & Gibson beat Taylor & Morton when Rhodes pinned Taylor, Windham (working as a face) beat Brad Street (very good match), Austin pinned Bart (bad), Sting double count out Koloff in a no DQ match, Hard Liners beat JFD & Josh in a cage match (subbing for Rick Steiner & Gigante) that was terrible and Luger pinned Simmons who had his foot on the rope but Race scooped it off.

7/30 in San Antonio drew 650 as News pinned Badd, Rhodes pinned Morton, Austin beat Mike Graham, Bart beat Rudy Boy (Rudy Gonzales), Hard Liners beat Dusty Wolfe & Salomon Grundy (subbing for Zenk & Steiner), Luger pinned Josh and Sting & Zenk & Gigante & Yellow Dog beat Studd & Windham & One Man Gang & Koloff when Sting pinned Gang.

7/29 in Phoenix saw Luger keep his title beating Rudy Boy.

7/31 in Corpus Christi drew 1,500 as Zenk beat Bart, Badd beat a local, Rhodes beat Morton, Luger beat Josh, Hard Liners beat Wolfe & Grundy, Austin beat News via DQ and Sting & Gigante & Simmons & Rhodes beat Koloff & Studd & Windham & Gang when Gigante pinned Gang.

Turner Home Entertainment last week sent out ad sheets for the September release of the Bash video headlined Legend vs. Legacy talking about the Ric Flair vs. Lex Luger main event that never happened and the six-person in a cage match that also didn't happen.

WWF

Wrestling Challenge taping on 7/30 in Portland, ME drew a full house of 9,000 (significant paper but they turned away fans at the door). In the third hour of the taping, which airs the weekend after Summer Slam, before Mr. Perfect attempted to do a squash match, he got into a brawl with Bret Hart and Hart stole the belt. Perfect then went out for a 30 second match (still badly bothered with a bad back) without the belt. I guess you can read into that whatever you want to. Jim Neidhart pinned Sgt. Slaughter, who was wearing his old pre-Iraqi sympathizer outfit with photographer Steve Taylor furiously taking photos for the new magazine so you can read into that whatever you want. Neidhart used one of Andre's crutches to get the win. Sid Justice pinned Typhoon in a 3:00 DUD that had no sustained heat. Sherri did an interview and said she wanted to slap Savage at the wedding and puke on Elizabeth. Maybe there's a place yet for Eric Embry in the WWF. Vince Apollo and Pete Doherty worked as jobbers. Randy Savage (subbing for Ultimate Warrior) pinned Undertaker in 5:00 clean in a bad match.

The wrestlers were all apparently told on 7/29 that they would be testing for steroids and told to get off the stuff and also warned that the feds were vigorously enforcing the new steroid law. As far as application of the testing, still no word on who, what or how as they are in the process of interviewing labaratories. At the same time, there doesn't seem to be any imminent change in those in the top positions.

Hulk Hogan filmed a Toyota commercial for the Middle East.

Prime Time Wrestling on 7/29 did a 2.4 rating, which is well down from normal while All-American on 7/28 did a 1.8, which is one of its lowest in history.

The new WWF magazine on the inside front cover reprints Vince McMahon's article in the New York Times.

Did you notice over the weekend when Sid Justice was out with Hogan and Warrior how the camera made it seem that Justice was the focal point and they were simply background? .

Big Bossman's interview for Summer Slam seemed to infer that he's going to win it for all the Mounties (since there has been so much publicity in Canada about the RCMP being so against the Mountie gimmick). My gut feeling is the character will undergo a change after serving time "in Prison." .

8/3 in Orlando drew 4,300 as The Dragon pinned Paul Roma **, Marty Janetty & Shane Douglas beat Orient Express ***3/4, British Bulldog pinned Typhoon -** (no announcement made regarding Mr. Perfect at any point in the show--it was the second month in a row Perfect had missed the match with Bulldog), Warrior beat Undertaker in a body bag match DUD, Greg Valentine pinned Col. Mustafa -*, Mountie pinned Bossman *1/4, Barbarian pinned Hercules DUD and Legion of Doom beat Nasty Boys via COR in a no DQ match **1/2.

Warrior missed all his dates this past week until Sunday in Orlando due to a problem at home.

Shawn Michaels' actual injury is a back injury and no word on how long he'll be out of action, but Shane Douglas will be taking his place until then.

British Bulldog missed a Monday night show also with a back injury but is expected back by the time you read this.

8/2 at the Nassau Coliseum in Long Island drew a $155,000 house which is slightly more than 10,000 paid although the 15,000 seat building was close to packed as Roma pinned Valentine, Berserker pinned Jim Powers, Bobby Heenan pinned Mr. Fuji, Dragon pinned Hercules, Snuka pinned Smash, Beverly Brothers beat Bushwhackers via DQ, IRS & DiBiase beat Virgil & Hart thanks to interference from Sherri and Hogan pinned Warlord.

8/3 in Indianapolis saw The Berserker over Jim Brunzell, Jim Duggan beat Demolition Smash, Kerry Von Erich double count out with Warlord, IRS & Ted DiBiase beat Virgil & Bret Hart, Jimmy Snuka pinned Hercules, Bushwhackers beat Beverly Brothers and Hulk Hogan pinned Sgt. Slaughter.

8/1 in Hershey, PA saw Valentine over Smash, Berserker over Snuka, Bushwhackers beat Power & Glory, Dragon pinned Barbarian, Virgil pinned DiBiase, IRS drew Hart, Slaughter beat Duggan via DQ and Legion of Doom beat Nasty Boys via DQ.

7/28 in New Haven saw Dragon over Barbarian, Von Erich pinned Haku, Bushwhackers beat Power & Glory, Neidhart pinned Earthquake, Smash pinned Douglas, DiBiase & IRS beat Virgil & Duggan and Hogan pinned Slaughter with Savage as referee.

8/2 in Pittsburgh drew 5,000 as Von Erich pinned Barbarian, Bulldog beat Typhoon via count out, Mustafa pinned Koko Ware, Mountie & Nasty Boys beat Bossman & Legion of Doom, Slaughter beat Duggan via DQ, Douglas & Janetty beat Orient Express (best match on card) and Savage pinned Undertaker. Outside the arena there were signs posted all over saying that Warrior was injured and that Savage would be his replacement in the main event. Before the show started the ring announcer announced that Michaels and Perfect were injured and refunds were offered.

THE READERS PAGES

Ray Baka of P.O. Box 19420, Cleveland, OH 44119 would like to buy Japanese wrestling t-shirts, particularly the Bruiser Brody t-shirt in which the proceeds were used for Brody's son's college fund.

Mark Vitek of 3008 S. Union Ave., Chicago, IL 60616 would like to purchase videotapes of Jushin Liger.

Michael Walsh of 82 Pilot Dr., Brick, NJ 08723 is looking to buy WCW wrestling cards 33, 96, 100, 112 and 142.

Cliff Brenner of P.O. Box 167, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 is looking to buy copies of the 1986 and 1987 Wrestling Observer Yearbooks and the book "The Fall Guys" by Marcus Griffin and "Drawing Heat" by Jim Freedman.

Clark Kent of 6022 N. Avondale, Chicago, IL 60631 is looking for videotapes of All Japan women from 1990 to the present.

Scott Limmer of 901 NW 8th Terr. #1416, Plantation, FL 33324 has wrestling magazines, videotapes and comic books for trade.

David McCormick of 13-C Floral Dr., Watertown, NY 13601 is looking for recent Japan tapes, old Mid-Atlantic tapes and Joel Goodhart indie tapes. In exchange he can trade the UWF Beach Brawl tape and 25 unopened packs of WWF Trading Cards Series I and 80 individual cards.

Gerald Sepi of 16200 Northwest 2nd Ave. #106., Miami, FL 33169 has early 1960s perfect condition wrestling magazines for sale and programs from Miami Beach and Orlando shows.

Ken Sabala of 353 Mill Rd., Addison, IL 60101 is looking for issues of the Wrestling Observer from 4/15/91 to 7/30/91.

Russ Cress of 787 Andover Rd., Union, NJ 07083 is looking for back issues of the Wrestling Observer and will trade videotapes in exchange for them.

Pam Irving of 77 Tarella Dr., Keilor Downs, Victoria, Australia 3038 is looking for a copy of U.K. Rampage from Sky/Eurosport station from Europe with original commentary in the PAL format.

Tom Wischmann of 13 Stevens Ln., Tabernacle, NJ 08088 is running a computer modem service to Pro Wrestling from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. at 609-859-1447.

STEROIDS

I was fortunate to begin subscribing to the Observer when this entire steroid story broke. Fortunate because your coverage of the subject far surpasses anything anywhere else. You wrote with such lucidity and expressed such unshakable logic that the entire story was completely told. Or so I thought. Watching Hulk Hogan on the Arsenio Hall show was as sobering as your articles were enlightening. It now seems almost irrelevant that Hogan has or had a steroid problem. The most serious questions about him is he's got an honesty problem. Watching him lie, duck and subvert the truth the way he did casts him to be in a new and completely reprehensible light. Forget about what was testified in court. Forget about the honest stories in the media. Hulk went to the public with his snake-oil pitch. I'm sure some of them bought it, too.

Curtis Minato
Los Angeles, California

I don't care what Vince McMahon or Basil DeVito have to stay about the WWF's drug testing policy. I'm not going to believe anything until I hear it directly from the WWF president himself, Jack Tunney!

Seriously, both you and John Arezzi have done a great job of covering this story.

Rene Clement
New York, New York

For those readers who may have missed my appearance on the Arsenio Hall show this past week where I discussed Titan Sports' allegation that I was a "satire user," here are the excerpts of the program transcript:

"Basically, I am not a satire abuser. There was one point several years ago, basically, when I used sarcasm, which is a form of satire, to get over a case of "writer's block" that could have kept me out of action for a year and I had no money in my pocket. But, basically, that was under the supervision of a licensed editor.

"Here's a letter I wrote when I was ten years old. It shows that, basically, I was a wisecracker with a big head all of my life. But, since I'm a wrestling humorist, people make assumptions. Nobody ever tested Andy Rooney for satire.

"I don't know anything about so-called Humor Growth Hormones.

"What I'm saying is, basically, if you say your monologues and take your typing courses, you can get published in any comedy journal without using satire...And my father, Giupetto, agrees."

Stately Wayne Manor
Wrestling World Magazine

I caught some clips of Vince McMahon's press conference courtesy of ESPN. That statement where he claimed the WWF doesn't push wrestlers based on their size and that he doesn't encourage steroid use may fool all the marks and the 10-year-old and the people who never watch wrestling, but give me a break. It doesn't wash with me. As for Hogan on Arsenio, yeah, right, and I'm the Jolly Green Giant.

Bob Ivy
Starkville, Mississippi

Thumbs down to all the people that are putting Hulk Hogan down for using steroids. For one thing, it's his business if he uses steroids. Because of his appearance, he's gotten everything that a man could ever want. As a teenager, I grew up being a Hulkamaniac and it made me the rookie wrestler that I am today.

Scott Little
Walnut Hill, Illinois

I am a cardiology assistant. About a year ago we were presented a case where a 16-year-old male was experiencing extreme hypertension (high blood pressure) and fatigued easily. His internist referred him to us after he picked up irregularities in his cardiogram (EKG) and a stress test was ordered.

As I went to prep him (shave his chest and apply electrodes) I noted severe stretch marks on his upper body and arms and his back was virtually covered with a severe case of acne. The pre-test EKG showed what is called VPD's (Ventricular Premature Depolarization--commonly known as skipped beats or extra beats).

I told the doctor I was assisting of my findings and of my suspicion of steroid use. After examining the boy, he drew me aside and confirmed my suspicions. We went ahead with the test to see if his skipped beats were the sign of a serious problem or a benign one. Fortunately for this kid, it was found to be, for now, nothing like threatening, although he needs to see a cardiologist regularly to see if it does develop into something serious in the future. By the way, he failed his stress test, becoming almost completely winded in five minutes and his blood pressure at that point was dangerously high.

After the boy and his parents talked to the doctor about his condition and treatment, I went to speak to the doctor. He told me the boy would in all likelihood be fine if he followed the doctor's plan of treatment. The doctor then told me he was very lucky. Three years earlier, an 18-year old patient of his came to the very edge of losing his life. His life was saved by a heart transplant just in the nick of time. His heart had been destroyed by abuse of steroids.

Name withheld by request (due to doctor/patient confidentiality)

One point has to be made before anyone calls Vince McMahon a hypocrite (which he is) and that is we all must realize that we all follow pro wrestling and cheer for wrestlers who are using steroids. Our support, even in that intangible way, contributes to steroid and drug usage in all sports.

David Brett
Melbourne, Australia

In my opinion, all points made on the steroid issue are moot. Vince McMahon is only interested in one thing right now, eliminating the one issue that could do him in. We will be seeing just as my steroided-out non-talents as before, but what Vince McMahon can now say is, "Hey, he's been tested and he's clean." Vince McMahon doesn't care about steroid abuse or any other abuse until it's an issue that could turn into a p.r. problem. The only education he'll give on steroids is the date of the tests and allow the guys to find out for themselves how to beat the test. It's worth the cost of going through with steroid testing to be able to run with the work of "cleaning up steroids" from wrestling as a p.r. move. If somewhere down the line, some mid-card or low-card guys have to be fall guys, then so be it. Nobody in the company has enough media name appeal where it would matter except Hulk Hogan. Vince will continue to do what he does best when faced with a problem. Lie. The best way to "solve" a problem in wrestling? Lie. The wrestlers are only the symptoms of the problem anyway. It's the promoters who have created the problem by pushing non-talented muscleheads as main eventers for the past six years.

Steve Mastropietro
Mechanicville, New York

BALTIMORE BASH

From being there live, the Bash gets a very slight thumbs up. There were some good matches, but too many questions were left unanswered. The scaffold match was ridiculous. Morton vs. Gibson was enjoyable. The first 13 minutes of the six-man match were excellent. Gigante and Gang worked their hardest to a decent match. The midgets were amusing. The chain match was pretty good but the finish ruined the match. Luger vs. Windham was a great four-star main event, but why did Luger walk off with Race and Hughes. I'm a big Ric Flair fan. I wanted to see him on the card. He would have made it a better show, but not if he was in the main event. Luger-Windham was a refreshing change. Everyone chanting "We Want Flair" probably would have been disappointed with a Flair-Luger match. I felt sorry for Luger and Windham. Windham proved that he was just as good, if not better than Flair because he carried Luger to a better match than Flair could have.

Ian Goodwin
Brooklyn, New York

I saw one of the great wrestling matches of my lifetime at the Baltimore Arena during the Great American Bash PPV show. Two great athletes, at the peak of their craft, giving every ounce of energy that they had to put on a show that none of us who saw it will ever forget. But it wasn't Sunday night. It was two years ago.

I'd have gladly traded two cage matches, a scaffold match, a chain match, a lumberjack match and even seeing Missy Hyatt in wrestling garb for the chance to see Ric Flair vs. Terry Funk live one more time.

This year's card wasn't a wrestling show. It was a lethargic mess of bad performers and bad gimmicks. All packaging. No substance. Even the veterans like Windham and Luger didn't seem to care. They just got the match over with and went to the next show.

Terry Funk was a cripple when he hit Baltimore for the PPV show two years ago. He could barely walk. He had suffered a broken back less than a month before the show. But when the lights went on, so did he. Injuries be damned, because to him, the show was the most important thing.

Ric Flair was the last wrestler WCW had who seemed to know that. Nobody on Sunday's show acted like anything on the card was important. It just came off like it was a day at work, and nothing more. WCW can't even draw in Charlotte or Atlanta anymore because the illusion that what they're doing is important isn't there anymore. Without Flair and Funk, it isn't.

Richard Wallner
Washington, D.C.

The PPV show was as bad live as it was on television. Luger vs. Windham was the best match, if only default. El Gigante vs. One Man Gang was a worst match of the year candidate. It saddens me to think that the last time I attended a show in Baltimore, I saw Ric Flair vs. Terry Funk headline a show that included Ricky Steamboat, the Great Muta, Terry Gordy, etc. It's worth noting that the building on that afternoon was sold out with a rowdy, enthusiastic crowd. The atmosphere was like a morgue this year, with the crowd mainly chanting, "We Want Flair" and "Dustin sucks." Speaking of Dustin, he should win the most overrated wrestler award for 1991. Scoring all those pinfalls in one show was a bit much for my taste. The worst part is that people continue to apologize for him, rationalizing that "he's not that bad." Well, he's not that damn good, either. You'd think he'd be embarrassed for being pushed so hard before he's ready, but I guess lack of humility runs in the family.

John McAdam
Nashua, New Hampshire

Big thumbs down for the Bash. I would rather have oral surgery than have to sit through watching that show again. Between the Ric Flair situation and the great booking of the show, I'd swear that Dusty Rhodes is still on McMahon's payroll.

Michael Hawkins
Bay Shore, New York

A big thumbs down. About the only good thing that could come out of the show is that the management of WCW realizes that Virgil Runnels shouldn't even be allowed to book his own flights out of Atlanta, let alone another wrestling show. The most glaring errors:

1) Putting one of the company's best wrestlers in the opening match in a situation where he couldn't work

2) Booking 11 matches in less than three hours. Didn't they learn anything from the Clash?

3) Did anyone expect anyone other than Dustin to have his arm raised at the end of the elimination match?

4) Is Luger now a heel? Why no post-match interview or locker room celebration?

5) Was the last match a main event calibre match? Is that the kind of match you want to send the fans home with?

Greg Vanden Heuvel
London, Ontario

CLARIFICATION

I would like to clarify some comments that appeared in the letters section of the 7/29 Observer. The comments that appeared made it seem like Barry Norman of the WCW office was knocking Ric Flair. That's not true. Norman's comments were frustrations directed at the Charlotte media and other publications calling for a boycott, not at Flair. I have dealt with Barry for several months now, and he has never spoken of Flair with anything except the highest respect. Barry helped me recently set up an interview with Flair that ran. Barry has always been a professional and has never badmouthed anyone whether they were working for WCW or not.

Mark Nulty
Atlanta, Georgia

GLOBAL

I've read and heard how the Global Wrestling Federation is going to be honest and treat the fans in an intelligent way. On today's show, I heard about a Global office in Barcelona, heard about Axl Rotten being Commonwealth champion and my favorite one was that the SWS is a subsidiary of the Global Wrestling Federation.

I guess it the tabloid theory of promoting telling Americans something about a foreign country and they'll believe it. It's kind of how the two-headed man always lives in Paraguay.

Brian Smith
New London, Connecticut

I visited the world famous Sportatorium this past Saturday night to see the second show of the new Global promotion. Joe Pedicino has really fixed the place up with a fresh coat of paint and new lighting. There is no sign of the USWA ever existing in the area. The card that night was somewhat long, but it was good to see a decent crowd in the building even though most got in free. The line-up of wrestlers is fair for a new promotion and I hope Pedicino can pull it off because Dallas deserves a good stable wrestling promotion again.

Darren Dawson
Lewisville, Texas

When I first saw Herb Abrams' TV show on Sports Channel last winter, I was really excited. He had a great talent roster and seemed ready to grow slowly until he could compete with the big promotions. Now, nearly one year later, his product his stale, his television shows border on being awful with poor production quality, boring commentary and seemingly endless commercials for those nifty 900 numbers.

I was aware of Joe Pedicino's intentions for a long time, but was very skeptical. I saw the talent roster in the Observer and was unimpressed, but I should have known better. After watching the TV tournament, I couldn't have been more pleased. I don't see the ring veterans that the UWF had, but what I did see are guys who are doing their best to put over the promotion and not themselves. So after the first few weeks, I have guarded optimism for Pedicino's success.

My only beef with the group is ESPN's no juice rule. Maybe by this time next year, the GWF will be touring and we can see juice at house shows.

Lou Bordeaux
West Springfield, Massachusetts

I have a general comment about the state of affairs at WCW and GWF. It is becoming more and more apparent to the fans that WCW is in a state of continuous lying. It is insulting even to the hardcore marks. The GWF started off strong, however, the commentary has become science fiction (all the references to international affiliations) and is an insult to any wrestling fans' intelligence. I won't even waste time trying to analyze or correct the specific problems of each promotion, however I've followed wrestling since the 60s and have seen many promotions go under because they underestimated the intelligence of their audience. Jim Ross should be selling snake oil. The GWF announcers should be selling used cars in Gainesville, Florida. I admired Gordon Solie's commentary for years, however he commented mainly on wrestling maneuvers and gave an historic perspective on wrestling. Today's commentatators can't do that because there is neither enough wrestling maneuvers nor any recognition of history to comment on.

Charles Cozart
Hawthorne, California

WCW

Well, I'm P.O. News and I'm good to go
My fat butt's here to bum rush this show
I'm large, but not in charge, and that's a fact
Big Dust once again will put us on our back

We got rid of the Nature Boy, that's plain to see
It somehow seems to all make sense to me
With what has happened before, well, what did you expect?
Remember Funk, Steamboat, Midnights and even Cornette?

We try harder, yes we do, each and every day
But it never seems to matter, no how, no way
We're just going to do whatever we please
Even if it brings WCW to its knees

You could say that we still have Sting and Luger
Well, if that ain't enough to make you toss a booger
We won't push anyone who knows how to work
Cause we think you fans are nothing but jerks

Instead we'll push the roidheads who won't do jobs
That's how we do it here, and if you think that's odd
We'll bring in new people who can't work a lick
That's our policy now and we'll make it stick

How did we come by this brilliant new plan
We just sat back and watched Vince McMahon
You think we care about good wrestling for you fans?
Here's what we think of you and your stupid demands

Look what we have for you, and it's not just crud
Scott Hall without his moustache, the Diamond Studd
We got Billy Jack Haynes with a hood on to boot
And Master Blaster Oz, now ain't we cute

That's the way it goes, that's how we think
Your opinions mean nothing, to us they stink
We push Johnny B. Badd more than we pushed Slick Ric
Don't it make you feel sad? Oops, you gonna be sick

Where are all the people who put this in the can, Uh?
Well, Ted be chasing Jane up in Montana
Petrik has no clue, he doesn't even know
While Herd's in the corner making pizza dough

Is there a moral to this story? None that I can tell
We do what we want and you can just go to hell
And just when you think there's nothing more we can do
It's the Great American Bash on pay-per-view

Yo baby, Yo baby, yo

James Steagall
Stoneville, North Carolina

WCW is once again a major mess. What I don't understand is why does Jim Herd always come off as blameless? He lost Terry Funk, Ricky Steamboat, never hired Bill Watts and now has lost Ric Flair. But everything is always either Ole Anderson or Dusty Rhodes' fault, right? The TV shows are confusing, even for someone like me who watches every week. Their house shows are losing money because of their great track record for no-shows. Who is the man in charge? How can you run a business that loses $6 million in a year, then lose your best employees and still keep your job? But nobody blames Jim Herd, because he's doing a fine job because he talks to newsletter editors and took such a strong stand on the steroid issue. I only wish my boss was as blind as Ted Turner.

Anthony Parillo
Providence, Rhode Island

I usually don't get too upset at anything that happens at a wrestling show but after attending the Great American Bash in Philadelphia on 7/5, I left the show a bit upset.

Fans in the front row were yelling at Dick Murdoch and Dick Slater the usual stuff like "Go home, old man" and some obscenities. Murdoch proceeded to turn around and yell at one young fan, who happened to be white, "Shut up you black-loving boy."

As I was sitting behind this person, I was really angry because as an African-American, I was insulted by the racial slur. No racial slurs were yelled at Mr. Murdoch. Why was it necessary for him to use when, especially when the person he was yelling at wasn't an African-American? WCW should tell their wrestlers to keep their prejudices to themselves and not to offend the fans. I would think with the poor crowds WCW is drawing they wouldn't want to alienate any of the remaining fans.

Deborah McWilliams
Jersey City, New Jersey

About two years ago, I made the decision not to spend any more money on WWF products or events. After watching the Great American Bash on 7/5 in Philadelphia, I've made the same decision about WCW. This has nothing to do with Ric Flair leaving the promotion. The promotion was terrible with him and they proved that they are just as bad without him.

The card was three hours of non-action and continually messed up finishes. We were given the extra treat of hearing Rick Steiner grab the mic and yelling, "F--- you" to Dick Murdoch. Since I had my six-year-old daughter with me, I doubly appreciated Steiner's remarks.

I blame Dusty Rhodes for the vulgarity, groin shots and screw-job finishes that make up the current WCW shows. It's like he wants everyone to go home bitter and disappointed so they'll never come back. Given time, he'll get his wish.

I agree 100 percent that the average WCW or WWF wrestler is better than the average independent wrestler, but what I don't agree with is that they give you better matches. I'll take a card promoted by Larry Sharpe over the WWF or WCW any day. Their attitudes are better, also. At indie shows, the fans cheer the faces and boo the heels and don't make personal remarks about them. At WCW shows, the villains get cheered, the faces get booed, the crowd chants the names of the wrestlers under masks and makes personal comments about their lives. I feel this is just a reaction to the company. WCW treats the fans as gutter scum and the fans react in kind.

I know it will never happen, but I'd love to see wrestling where the fans respect the wrestlers, the wrestlers respect the fans, everyone makes enough money to live comfortably.

Paul Verlander
Gloucester, New Jersey

I've been a fan for more than 25 years and I've never been as frustrated with wrestling as I am right now. I love this sport and have followed it no matter what has happened but I'm getting to the point where it all seems meaningless.

The recent circumstances under which Ric Flair was fired are the most ludicrous circumstances I've ever heard. Flair is without a doubt the best wrestler around. He has a love for this sport that matches that of anyone. He gave his life to this business and to be treated this way by the group that he kept alive for the past few years is beyond me. It is just the sign of the times we are now living in, not just in this sport, but in any other sport. I've seen things like this happen in my workplace a lot in the last five years that I'd never seen before, and it's changing at an alarming rate. Respect and dedication are no longer a part of our culture.

I read the letters by Mike Gunter and Klon and it put it all in perspective for me. I couldn't have said it any better. Flair, to me, is what pro wrestling is all about. He did things to benefit the company, and not necessarily himself. Sting's reaction at the Meadowlands when he lost the title says everything that needs to be said. The great interview by Flair after he won back the title from Sting shows just how much he loves the sport. He didn't try to put himself over as much as to give Sting a message on how one is to conduct himself as a true champion, something Flair knows a lot about.

Lenis Sargent
Gainesville, Georgia

I've been a dedicated fan of NWA/WCW for 15 years. At the beginning of this year, I had an interview for an inventory accounting clerk position with the promotion. Today, I'm happy I wasn't hired because I don't want to be standing in the unemployment line at the end of the year. When I go to a wrestling event, I don't want to see bad gimmicks or comedy. I want to see wrestling. In closing, Mr. Herd, if you still have my resume on file, please tear it up. I have no more interest in working for your company.

Gary Lynch
Fayetteville, Georgia

I read with interest Steve Sims' recommendation on revamping WCW. Steve, like many others, wants a return to the gold old days, but unfortunately, the nature of wrestling today precludes many of the tricks used in the good old days. His suggestion of bringing in a new, invincible wrestler winning the title in a squash match struck a memory chord. I remember when Bob Orton was earning his tripes. He made two trips through Dallas in the mid-70s. The first, he was typical cannon fodder. He left and returned about six months later with some seasoning and was put on a television winning streak for six weeks. Then, in a TV main event, he went up against a newcomer that hadn't been seen in the area. Orton was crushed with the match ending by submission and the newcomer got over like gangbusters.

Similarly, Johnny Valentine's debut in Texas in the 1960s was marked with a match against Grizzly Smith. Again, the locals knew nothing about this newcomer and my cousins informed me that Grizzly would destroy this blond with no problem. When Grizzly ended up juiced and hanging in the ropes and totally destroyed cleanly, Valentine was over huge. Unfortunately, with today's national scope, there is really no way to bring in an "unknown" wrestler to take over like that. Today, fans immediately recognize newcomers who jump from one group to another, witness that everyone knew who Sid Vicious was at the WWF tapings even though he'd never been on TV for that group. Today, you need a wrestler with experience to get over big as a newcomer, and today, that's a contradiction.

I think the invincibility routine is grossly overrated. What WCW needs is a contract structure that provides for a sizable portion of the contract money to be backloaded and payable upon completion of the terms of the contract, whether it be six weeks, six months or six years. This payment would be based on the wrestler agreeing to do turns, jobs and whatever was required by the promotion. In the glory days of World Class wrestling, a great deal of the success was based on the All-American Von Erichs doing jobs when necessary. Most of the time the belts were on heels and there were extended programs where the Von Erichs would get them, but they'd lose them back. Sting and Lex Luger would do better if they were beaten occasionally and had to rededicate themselves and fight harder to beat the guy who beat them. But WCW is probably so frightened of losing them that they wouldn't think of asking them to really put someone over. I was disappointed with the Clash. I hoped, although the logical side of my brain realized it wouldn't happen, that Muta would be put over with an impressive clean cut win over Luger. Instead we got one of those infamous "The meter's running in the taxi" matches.

I strongly agree with Steve on the subject of submissions. Today's wrestling needs more clean pins and submissions to enforce realism. A killer submission move against a jobber can't became impotent against the stars.

Joe Gillespie
San Jose, California
Headliner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 05:39 AM   #174 (permalink)
Vince gives me a comedy gimmick
 
666_The_Game_666's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6,121
666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

July 11 1994 Observer Newsletter: McMahon trial underway,
tons of details on the proceedings, Gorilla Monsoon's referee
son dies, controversial Bret interview, more

Code:
 

Wrestling Observer Newsletter 

POBox1228,Campbell,CA95009-1228July11,1994 

One key point to remember for any of you who have made up your minds about the Titan Sports/Vince 
McMahon steroid case's final results ahead of time. You can never predict what a jury will do. Every time 
there is a major legal case in the public eye, as there is now more than ever, experienced lawyers go on 
"Nightline" "20/20" and their ilk and those words are always repeated. You can never predict what a jury 
will do once it gets the case. 

After jury selections on 7/5, the trial of Titan Sports and steroid distribution and conspiracy to distribute 
charges got under way on 7/6. The trial is expected to last three weeks, down from the original five weeks 
and several witnesses originally subpoenaed for the May trial were not subpoenaed for this trial because it's 
being held down on time. 

The trial opened with Sean O'Shea making opening statements for the prosecution. He opened saying that 
Anita Scales, who still works for Titan Sports and was in charge of handling athletic commissions, would 
testify that when she learned about Dr. George Zahorian distributing steroids to wrestlers after the 
Pennsylvania state athletic commission was closed down, she wanted to no longer use him as the physician 
for the shows in Hershey. When she attempted to do so, Pat Patterson (Pierre Clermont) allegedly told her 
they had to keep Zahorian because the boys wanted him there. Chief Jay Strongbow (Joe Scarpa) also told 
her the boys needed their candy (drugs) and they needed him there. Zahorian himself called her up 
vehement claiming that Hershey was "his town." She then went to Linda McMahon who told her that she 
had to listen to what Patterson said. The government claimed that when she tried to stop the WWF from 
using Zahorian as a doctor and was rebuffed, that she was working against the conspiracy. O'Shea said 
that Titan later learned about the investigation into Zahorian and cut all ties with him and conspired to 
cover its tracks. He said if they hadn't, the government would have caught both red-handed back in 1991. 
He mentioned that Zahorian set up shop in the locker room in Hershey and Allentown. He said McMahon 
many times distributed steroids to wrestlers but that they were only going to focus on two occasions in 
1989 when he claimed McMahon distributed steroids to Hulk Hogan (Terry Bollea). He said that McMahon 
bought the steroids for Hogan and that they took money out of the corporation, but had bank checks 
written up for Zahorian so the funds couldn't be traced back to the company or any individual. He said 
McMahon urged and cajoled the wrestlers to use steroids. When they learned of the investigation into 
Zahorian, Vince, Linda and Patterson got together to cover their tracks. Patterson, who O'Shea claimed he 
would prove did so under Vince's urging, always phoned Zahorian on pay phones because they were afraid 
of calls being bugged or traced and they also shredded documents to cover their tracks, and told Zahorian 
to destroy all records regarding WWF personnel. O'Shea said that during the trial Richard Rood (Rick Rude) 
would testify that at one time when he was getting small (this is believed to be during his run on top 
feuding with Ultimate Warrior for the WWF title in late 1990 when he and his wife wanted to have a baby 
and steroids make it harder to impregnate because it can lower sperm count, usually a temporary side 
effect, so Rude got off steroids and shrunk to 210) that McMahon told him specifically to "Get back on the 
juice." They said there would be testimony that WWF agents would give wrestlers advance money (draws) 
on the road and see the wrestlers take the money and then use it to buy drugs from Zahorian. That after 
the steroid law changed the WWF continued to promote use and never took any measures until 1991 to get 
the guys to stop using and even suggested in a memo that wrestlers get prescriptions for steroids from 
their doctor for injuries and carry the prescriptions with them at all times. O'Shea said that Zahorian lied in 
testimony at his trial but would be telling the truth at this trial. He said that Patterson warned Hogan to 
stay away from Zahorian because he was hot. And he also said that Emily Feinberg, McMahon's former 
secretary, got the bank checks under advice on how to make the funds untraceable from company chief 


financial officer Doug Sages, that steroids were a way of life in the company, that she was forced to 
destroy records and that Patterson had full knowledge of her destroying records and they claimed in the 
trial they would force Patterson to say he was doing so under orders from McMahon. O'Shea apparently did 
a tremendous job with the opening statements. 
destroy records and that Patterson had full knowledge of her destroying records and they claimed in the 
trial they would force Patterson to say he was doing so under orders from McMahon. O'Shea apparently did 
a tremendous job with the opening statements. 

*Jerry McDevitt, one of the Titan lawyers, came next, mainly to rebut O'Shea. While McDevitt was good, he 
was clearly out of his league according to our reports in comparison with Laura Brevetti (the other Titan 
attorney) and O'Shea. He mainly tried to impugn the credibility of the witnesses, claiming there was no 
conspiracy because McMahon and Zahorian never talked and that McMahon had to pay full price for his 
steroids so they weren't in business together. Naturally he tried to impugn Zahorian saying that they've 
already admitting he lied in his own trial so how can people believe he's telling the truth here and in which 
case would he be charged with perjuring himself. He also noted that Hogan lied on national TV, although 
McDevitt was defensive of Hogan's lie claiming he did so because the media didn't understand the steroid 
story and Hogan lied to avoid a media frenzy (by defending his lie, this may give credence to the theory the 
company was behind the lie after all which, if true, makes Randy Savage's radio comments pathetic). 
Brevetti later echoed these comments blaming the media for Hogan having to lie because he was afraid of 
the negative stigma of using steroids and how it would affect his future career. McDevitt said that the 
Grand Jury spent three summers investigating McMahon and this is all they got. He admitted to steroid use 
in the company but said that use was legal (a confusing issue we've gone through a million in that use 
wasn't illegal per se but possession without a medical prescription was illegal and in many cases wrestlers 
didn't have prescriptions so that possession would be illegal). He said McMahon and Zahorian hadn't spent 
five minutes talking together their entire lives (a statement contradicted later in the day by Randy Culley). 
He said wrestlers used steroids to enhance their athletic performance and that there was no need to 
conspire for distribution at that time because they were easy to obtain. (This is a valid point in that there 
were other outlets to obtain steroids but Zahorian was the major source because the wrestlers knew they 
were getting the real thing from him, which was something they couldn't be sure of from the black market. 
There was no direct economic conspiracy per se but it was well-known at the time the guys needed 
steroids to have the look necessary in most cases to work on top and the company was making tons of 
money merchandising those chemically enhanced physiques, so the ultimate question is the indirect 
conspiracy strong enough for a conviction on a conspiracy charge). He said that McMahon had asked 
Zahorian if he was distributing steroids to wrestlers and Zahorian told Vince that he was, but Vince felt 
since a doctor was doing it that it was safer than having the wrestlers go to the black market. This was the 
defense Zahorian tried to use unsuccessfully in his own trial that he was doing the wrestlers a favor and 
protecting their health by giving them steroids rather then them going to the black market and getting 
steroids that were more questionable and perhaps more dangerous. He claimed Titan Sports never made 
money off steroid distribution (a statement that could be heavily argued as far as indirect money, but as far 
as direct money, no doubt true which will be a key point to how the jury views this as far as the ultimate 
verdict, and probably will be the key point as the trial goes on). He called the distribution to Hogan as two 
friends sharing steroids and claimed all the government witnesses had axes to grind or were disgruntled ex-
employees and some worked currently for Titan's main competition (hey, wait a minute, I thought Titan 
had no competition?) and mentioned Hogan just signing a multi-million dollar contract for Titan's leading 
competitor (an invalid point because when Hogan gave his grand jury testimony last summer, he was still 
with Titan and negotiations hadn't even begun with WCW). He also pointed out that these wrestlers all used 
steroids when they weren't in the WWF as well. An interesting tactic was that McDevitt tried to portray 
McMahon as a singular individual saying that the jury's decision would be the biggest thing ever in his life, 
although in the judge's ruling where the two counts against Titan distributing to McMahon were dropped, 
the judge ruled that as 100% owner of Titan Sports, that Vince and Titan legally when it comes to this case 
are one and the same citing legal precedent which may be a key point as well. 

*Laura Brevetti, whose performance as a lawyer was said to be worthy of an academy award if this was a 
movie, said that the wrestlers all had to train hard and eat right to obtain the look (true to a point, but the 
vast majority could eat perfect and train like crazy and still not look like most of the headliners of the day 
without steroids so the fact many of them were disciplined eating and training really isn't valid or germane 
when it comes to this case). She then said that wrestling wasn't a competitive sport, called wrestling fake 
and gave the most detailed expose of pro wrestling ever given in history of how matches are set up and 
worked. She claimed steroid use among the wrestlers was a personal choice and painted McMahon as an 
honest man since he was the first promoter to admit wrestling wasn't real and that Hogan will tell you how 


wrestling was going nowhere with the beer drinking redneck crowd before they changed the sport. She said 
that McMahon made the personal choice to use steroids because he didn't know of the potential harm, and 
that today he'd have never made that same choice (a bogus point as has been made before here since the 
potential harm of steroids was well known to the average layperson in the gym in the 70s, although later 
Randy Culley also testified when he started using steroids in 1979, he had no idea of potential side effects, 
although Randy Culley's knowledge of steroids in 1979 and Vince McMahon's of steroids in 1989 are two 
different stories). She also blamed the athletic commission of Pennsylvania, which also knew of its own 
doctor distributing steroids and did nothing to stop him, for the problem (which is a valid point that needed 
to be brought up because there were governmental officials who knew of Zahorian distributing steroids to 
wrestlers and they continued to license him as their own ringside doctor and state commission 
representative anyway). She claimed that Scales has the type of personality where she can't take being 
overruled well and that she has now developed 20/20 hindsight. Brevetti complained that McMahon is 
charged with being involved in a conspiracy with Zahorian but Zahorian isn't being charged and is being 
used as a government witness and his testimony will help him get out earlier. She claimed that Feinberg 
was earning $64,000 a year as McMahon's secretary and got one year severance pay when she was let go, 
and as soon as the severance pay ran out, she became an FBI informant and Brevetti claimed she'd show 
that nothing illegal happened. She claimed McMahon didn't know Zahorian wasn't acting as a doctor during 
this period and that if it was so obvious that McMahon should have known, why did the government have 
to call an expert witness (Wadler) who is paid for testifying at trials to say that Zahorian wasn't acting in a 
medical capacity when he distributed steroids? 
that McMahon made the personal choice to use steroids because he didn't know of the potential harm, and 
that today he'd have never made that same choice (a bogus point as has been made before here since the 
potential harm of steroids was well known to the average layperson in the gym in the 70s, although later 
Randy Culley also testified when he started using steroids in 1979, he had no idea of potential side effects, 
although Randy Culley's knowledge of steroids in 1979 and Vince McMahon's of steroids in 1989 are two 
different stories). She also blamed the athletic commission of Pennsylvania, which also knew of its own 
doctor distributing steroids and did nothing to stop him, for the problem (which is a valid point that needed 
to be brought up because there were governmental officials who knew of Zahorian distributing steroids to 
wrestlers and they continued to license him as their own ringside doctor and state commission 
representative anyway). She claimed that Scales has the type of personality where she can't take being 
overruled well and that she has now developed 20/20 hindsight. Brevetti complained that McMahon is 
charged with being involved in a conspiracy with Zahorian but Zahorian isn't being charged and is being 
used as a government witness and his testimony will help him get out earlier. She claimed that Feinberg 
was earning $64,000 a year as McMahon's secretary and got one year severance pay when she was let go, 
and as soon as the severance pay ran out, she became an FBI informant and Brevetti claimed she'd show 
that nothing illegal happened. She claimed McMahon didn't know Zahorian wasn't acting as a doctor during 
this period and that if it was so obvious that McMahon should have known, why did the government have 
to call an expert witness (Wadler) who is paid for testifying at trials to say that Zahorian wasn't acting in a 
medical capacity when he distributed steroids? 

*Culley (Moondog Rex) was the first government witness, largely saying that when the WWF taped 
television in Allentown that he'd get his three week supply from Zahorian, and that after they stopped 
taping in Allentown, he'd get larger supplies from Zahorian. McDevitt tried to establish that Zahorian, who 
was a doctor at ringside for Titan events from 1977 to 1989, was his doctor since he saw him 16 times a 
year which Culley laughed off saying if he had a medical problem he'd never go to Zahorian. That was later 
contradicted when it was brought up that in 1987 when Culley was suffering from depression or steroid 
mood swings, he went to Zahorian who gave him valium. Apparently McDevitt took an aggressive stance 
against Culley, immediately pointing out that he had never finished high school, which may have backfired 
early since it appeared he came off as bullying a simple country boy type. Culley said that he thought he 
was given more of a chance in the WWF because he took steroids although admitted to using steroids 
when he wasn't with the WWF as well. McDevitt argued that it wasn't the steroid look which gave him 
whatever spot he got (both valid and invalid, in that Culley didn't get a spot as a Moondog based on having 
a ripped bodybuilder physique that one associates with steroid use but it's actually atypical that steroid 
users can attain it because of genetic limitations, but big size was a benefit in the Moondog role and the 
steroids gave him added size. Unlike a Jim Hellwig or a Terry Bollea, he very well may have been big 
enough without steroids to play the same role). He said he'd get in line to get steroids from Zahorian at the 
tapings, get his steroids and leave, with the point being he was never given a medical check-up for possible 
side-effects while he was being distributed the steroids. McDevitt asked if McMahon ever told him to lose 
weight, he responded yes, he did for the Demolition role (Culley was the original Smash for a short period 
before Barry Darsow), apparently trying to imply that he actually wanted him smaller, however Culley in 
cross-examination by O'Shea said that he used anavar (a steroid used to harden up the body) to lose the 
weight and get more muscular. Brevetti established that wrestlers receive draws on the road at every show 
of $100 to $200, not just when Zahorian was there, and the money was used to pay hotels, meals, etc. 

*Tom Zenk was next, who said he started using steroids in 1981, getting them from a doctor in Minnesota. 
Zenk came off far more eloquent and articulate than Culley, which at the beginning made every most 
interested in what he had to say. His key testimony was saying that Jack Lanza, a WWF agent, told him, 
referring to Zahorian, that if you want anything, he's got it. Zenk said he left the WWF after six months in 
1987 because he wasn't happy with his money and had a problem with Patterson and Terry Garvin but 
wasn't specific as to what it was. He said after he left he got a deal with All Japan and Titan sued him 
wanting a percentage of his All Japan income and he, on the phone to Linda McMahon, told her something 
to the effect of, How would you like it if I call the New York times you're selling a product of men on 
steroids s family entertainment and said Linda responded, I don't think that would be a good idea, and he 
said he took that as a threat. O'Shea made it clear Zenk was subpoenaed and didn't want to be there. 
McDevitt established that Zenk called the McMahon house just three weeks ago and asked him if he was on 
drugs when he called and Zenk said he wasn't. Zenk said he called and apologized to them and said his 


heat was with Rick Martel and not them. He said he left because he was angry at Martel, Patterson and 
Garvin. McDevitt brought up Zenk's steroid arrest in Atlanta a few years ago and Zenk admitted to being a 
first-time offender. Zenk said McMahon never told him to use steroids and said he never got any steroids 
from Zahorian. He said after leaving the WWF he purchased steroids at a Gold's Gym in Atlanta and 
admitted risk in buying black market steroids. He said he didn't even have to work out when he was on 
steroids because he had good genetics and compared steroids to putting fertilizer on a lawn. Zenk said the 
last time he used steroids was three weeks ago. 
Garvin. McDevitt brought up Zenk's steroid arrest in Atlanta a few years ago and Zenk admitted to being a 
first-time offender. Zenk said McMahon never told him to use steroids and said he never got any steroids 
from Zahorian. He said after leaving the WWF he purchased steroids at a Gold's Gym in Atlanta and 
admitted risk in buying black market steroids. He said he didn't even have to work out when he was on 
steroids because he had good genetics and compared steroids to putting fertilizer on a lawn. Zenk said the 
last time he used steroids was three weeks ago. 

*Terry Szopinski (Warlord) was next, admitting injecting other wrestlers and regularly flushing needles 
down toilets. It was brought up that Bret Hart did a drawing of a guy bent over with a bullseye drawn on 
his butt with a needle. He said when he got to the WWF that Dave Hebner told him he could get steroids 
and pills from Zahorian and that he went into a room with Zahorian who had pills and syringes but he 
thought the prices were too high so he got his steroids from other sources and specifically brought up a 
source he met in a gym in Europe and believed what he was getting was real since it was sent from 
Europe. He said before the Zahorian trial Vince told the wrestlers and if they were using steroids, to leave 
them at home and not to take them on the road. Szopinski admitted he weighed 195 pounds when he 
graduated high school, and started using them in college in 1984 and gained 55 pounds in four months, 
weighs 305 now and weighed 320 to 340 in the WWF. He said McMahon told him to get off steroids after 
the Zahorian trial and he stopped using them at that point. He started using them after leaving and was 
arrested and is on 18 months probation and claimed to have not used steroids since his arrest, which many 
people openly laughed at. Warlord admitted writing a letter to McMahon asking for his job back recently. 

*The final first day witness was Tully Blanchard, who tried to bring up the Sid Justice/Harvey Whippleman 
story was the judge struck it from the record as hearsay. Blanchard said he had a conversation at a 
swimming pool with McMahon before joining the WWF and McMahon told him they were concerned about 
cocaine but didn't care about pot or steroids, but in later cross examination he changed his story and said 
McMahon never mentioned steroids. Blanchard admitted he started using steroids in 1977, that before he 
ever went to the WWF he knew of Zahorian as the drug supplier, that he saw injections on occasion and 
also saw needles. He said he usually got his steroids from gyms and when asked if steroid use was worse in 
the NWA than the WWF during his heyday and he said it was pretty close. 

Most of the arguments at this point seemed centered around the conspiracy charge, which is only one of 
the three charges but the one that would appear to be the most difficult of the three to get a conviction on. 
By conceding McMahon shared steroids with his friend Hogan, the defense euphemism for distribution, it is 
a basic admission of the charge but an attempt to say it wasn't or shouldn't be illegal because they were 
friends. This seems on the surface to be a shaky premise because in school we were all taught that if you 
give your friends your own prescription drugs that you are violating the law and can be charged with 
distribution. However, the defense did a great job in establishing that all wrestlers used steroids before and 
in some cases after working in the WWF and to this point nobody was ever specifically told to use steroids. 
The prosecution failed to even attempt to establish the point that if the physiques helped them get the job 
in the first place, then almost inherently they'd be most often hiring people who had used steroids before. 

Although the case has been totally overshadowed in the media because of the O.J. Simpson case, there 
were several television shows and major newspapers in the New York market largely and a few national 
shows in attendance at the opening day of the trial. ESPN did the same seven-minute segment for 
SportsCenter shows that aired both 7/4 and 7/5, which were factually strong stories but didn't break any 
new ground, using interviews with Bruno Sammartino, Billy Graham and steroid expert Dr. Charles Yesalis of 
Penn State University. The stories were exceedingly negative from a Titan and McMahon standpoint. 

Among the other witnesses expected to testify in upcoming days include Hellwig (Ultimate Warrior), Terry 
Bollea, Roy Wayne Farris (Honkytonk Man), Rood, Sages, Dr. Gary Wadler (a steroid expert who was part 
of the Zahorian case), Zahorian, John Minton (John Studd), and Tony Garea. 

Special thanks to Wade Keller of Pro Wrestling Torch for his help in putting this story together. 

*********************************************************** 


CLASH OF THE CHAMPIONS FINAL POLL RESULTS 
Thumbs up 136 (47.7%) 
Thumbs down 107 (37.5%) 
In the middle 42 (14.7%) 
BEST MATCH POLL 


Ric Flair vs. Sting 158 
Nasty Boys vs. Jack & Sullivan 30 
Steve Austin vs. Johnny B. Badd 19 
Larry Zbyszko vs. Steve Regal 9 

WORST MATCH POLL 

Guardian Angel vs. Tex Slashinger 108 

Steve Austin vs. Johnny B. Badd 31 

Larry Zbyszko vs. Steve Regal 16 

Ric Flair vs. Sting 13 

Based on phone calls, letters and fax messages to the Observer as of 7/5. Statistical margin of error: +100% 
For whatever this means, the letters we received regarding the Clash were decidedly more negative 
than phone calls that came the first few days. 

*********************************************************** 

Long-time WWF referee Joey Marella passed away in the early morning on 7/4, continuing pro wrestling's 
so-called "Fourth of July curse." Marella, 30, a sandlot baseball standout in his teens and son of Gorilla 
Monsoon (Robert Marella), had been a referee with the WWF for most of the past ten years. 

Marella had finished the lengthy television taping the previous night in Ocean City, MD where he worked 
several matches including the final match of the night between Bret Hart and Owen Hart. He then left and 
was driving with Harvey Whippleman (Bruno Lauer) to the Newark Jetport, a hotel near the Newark Airport 
on the Jersey Turnpike, where both would be staying until taking an early flight home in the morning. At 
about 2:55 a.m., he apparently fell asleep at the wheel and the car crashed into a guard rail. Whippleman, 
who was wearing his seat belt, escaped with minor cuts and bruises while Marella, who wasn't, was thrown 
from the car and killed, believed to have been instantaneously. The accident took place at the Southern end 
of the Jersey Turnpike in Burlington County, near Philadelphia and Camden, NJ. 

It was a sad and tragic irony, because a few years earlier, Marella was involved in a serious auto accident 
on a July 4th in which he suffered an injured spleen. Among the other wrestling tragedies in recent years 
on July 4th have included the 1988 death of Adrian Adonis in an auto accident in Newfoundland and the 
1990 parasailing accident involving Brutus Beefcake which required 11 hours of reconstructive facial 
surgery. 

Marella was considered the WWF's No. 2 referee behind Earl Hebner at the time of his death. In recent 
years, Marella had been suspended because of a substance problem, but had returned to work and was a 
very popular figure among most of the wrestlers. Both Brian Lee (Evil Undertaker) and Bryan Clark (Adam 
Bomb) were apparently originally going to make the road trip with Marella and Whippleman but for 
whatever reason, fate was working in both men's favor and they caught other transportation. 


A native of Willingboro, NJ, Marella was living in Tampa in recent years. The funeral was scheduled for 7/8 
at the Jose Funeral Home in Willingboro at 10 a.m. 

Marella's final television appearances will air on the various syndicated shows over the next few weeks, as 
he refereed several matches all three nights of the weekend tapings. 

*********************************************************** 

Bret Hart was back on FAN in Toronto, the same station a few months ago where Hart caused a lot of 
controversy and changed many people in wrestling's opinion of him with his comments on Ric Flair and the 
drug situation in WCW. Hart must have liked the reaction, since he was back for more, talking about Hulk 
Hogan, Flair and their WCW match. 

When one of the hosts asked him his opinion on Hogan signing with WCW, the conversation went like this: 

"To me, it's a sad pathetic ending for a guy who was a legend who had a legacy with the WWF. I don't 
care what anybody says, to me, the WCW is a step down." The host then said, "So he's going to AAA (the 
baseball term for top minor league group, not the wrestling promotion obviously) basically is what you're 
saying." Hart responded, "I would say so. I really think so and it's kind of sad. I think his whole legacy was 
with the WWF. He couldn't seem to pass the torch down to the up-and-coming stars, which were all 
younger guys." The host responded, "He's got lots of bucks, why wouldn't he just retire." Hart then said, 
"Well, let's face it, his movie career was a complete dud, disaster," at which point the host interrupted him 
and said, "But you've got one going." Hart responded, "That's a possibility but that's so remote still at this 
point. I wouldn't want to try to come across as a movie person until I at least saw myself on film. But going 
back to Hulk Hogan, when you're out of sight, you're out of mind. When you're off television, you need to 
be on that television and it becomes a very egotistical thing. He couldn't be on the WWF television 
anymore as the superstar that he used to be so went down to the AAA, as they say, or WCW. There's a lot 
of talk of Hulk Hogan and Ric Flair, this great match. The greatest match-up of all-time kind of stuff. It 
might have been the greatest match-up in some people's minds 15 years ago, but it's a little bit like that 
old Sheik wrestling in Detroit. It's like Bobo Brazil wrestling The Sheik. That doesn't do anything. I think 
you're really going to see that Ric Flair is very limited in the ring. In my opinion, his best days were over 
long before he ever lost to me. And Hulk Hogan, I don't know if anyone's seen him now. I'm embarrassed 
for him. The guy used to be a hero to me. I'm embarrassed to see what's he's become. It's like flogging a 
dead horse. The WCW thing, there will be some interest initially but it'll wane fast." 

The only other key thing out of the interview was when the host brought up Hart was being a part-owner 
of a Calgary hockey team as was reported in numerous newspapers throughout Canada, Hart said that it 
wasn't a done deal, but it looks like it's going to happen. 

*********************************************************** 

World Championship Wrestling's one-hour live show on 7/9 will feature the debut of a gimmick where fans, 
through the 900 line, get to pick a match. The WWF has done similar gimmicks beforehand, although not 
for a live show. 

The show, which will include live appearances by Hogan and Mr. T, will have a face dressing room with 
Johnny B. Badd, Dustin Rhodes, Arn Anderson, Guardian Angel, Jim Steele, Sting and Kevin Sullivan, and a 
heel dressing room with Ric Flair, Vader, Terry Funk, Bunkhouse Buck, Steve Austin and Jean-Paul Leveque. 
Fans are supposed to vote for one wrestler from each dressing room, and with them pushing the idea that 
Sensuous Sherri is barred, makes one think that unless they run a live angle to lead the audience into 
picking, that the match will be Flair vs. Sting which will almost certainly lead to an angle involving Hogan, 
and probably T. In 1985, Mr. T, coming off a starring role in Rocky III (in which Hogan had a cameo) and 
at the time being one of the biggest television stars in the country on the highly-rated "A Team" show, got 
involved in a wrestling angle which aired live on MTV involving Hogan and Roddy Piper from Madison 
Square Garden and was the catalyst for much of mainstream explosion of wrestling. Mr. T may have been 
the most popular fad star on television at the time, but even one year later, his fame was running to a 
screeching halt. He was brought back for the second Wrestlemania to face Piper in a boxing farce, and by 


this time T's mainstream popularity had changed to people growing not only tired of his act, but hating his 
act to the point that Piper, at the time the group's No. 1 heel, was cheered both live and in virtually every 
closed-circuit. Nine years later, Mr. T is a non-entity, a nostalgia figure who will be a reminder of just how 
easily people can embrace and discard fad personalities. Unless they have a creative way of using him, his 
name will mean nothing. 
act to the point that Piper, at the time the group's No. 1 heel, was cheered both live and in virtually every 
closed-circuit. Nine years later, Mr. T is a non-entity, a nostalgia figure who will be a reminder of just how 
easily people can embrace and discard fad personalities. Unless they have a creative way of using him, his 
name will mean nothing. 

WCW officials came out of the Clash telling one another they had produced a perfect-10 show, which was 
something of a self-delusion to begin with. Even though the ratings didn't come back strong, that was 
dismissed because the ratings did grow well and the since the numbers of the past two June Clashes were 
so poor, they used the past two years as a measuring stick to say the ratings were good when they really 
weren't. However, reality hit when the numbers came back for the 6/25 Saturday Night show at a 2.1 on a 
week with no Sunday show (which traditionally adds about .3 to the ratings). In other words, if we are to 
believe television ratings, which are probably relied on too heavily, but since we don't have a better system, 
they are what they are, the Clash angle, and more importantly, the significant involvement of Hulk Hogan in 
the main focused feud in the promotion, didn't add any measurable number of new viewers. More 
importantly, all the excuses as to why Hogan hadn't added viewers to that point had to finally be thrown 
out the window. Hogan was involved in a major program, and they had promised the contract signing of 
the Hogan-Flair match with the celebrated Ted Turner appearing on a wrestling show, but the ratings were 
basically the same as they would have been had none of this been going on. While holding numbers steady 
these days is hardly a negative, the company is paying too much added expense because of the Hogan 
contract to justify just holding steady. Those numbers created a lot of long faces and sudden skepticism 
about the PPV drawing power of the Bash at the Beach, the show the company is spending a record 
amount of advertising for, not to mention the huge guarantee Hogan is receiving. Because that kind of 
mindset usually leads to major angles, hence the very term desperation angles, I'd expect, without being 
told, one of the biggest ever on the live show. 

Whether that's a positive or a negative will be determined when the buy rate comes out. But this is 
certainly a more interesting period to follow WCW than in many years. 

************************************************************ 

An unexpected title change took place at the Smoky Mountain Wrestling Summer Blast tour. 

Jake Roberts no-showed the first three shows of the tour, which he was scheduled to headline in cage 
matches against Dirty White Boy. On 7/1 in Knoxville, which drew a disappointing crowd of 700 considering 
they had a cage match and the Funks were brought in to work underneath, Roberts apparently left word 
that he'd arrive at around 9:30 p.m., so they stalled the show and he never arrived. They ended up 
substituting Bruiser Bedlam, who had earlier in the show lost a Dock fight to Tracy Smothers, in the cage 
against White Boy with White Boy going over. Roberts left no word and missed Barbourville, KY on 7/2, 
which drew 850 fans which is SMW's second biggest house ever in the city, trailing only the show that the 
Steiners appeared on. With Roberts not there, White Boy faced in a cage whomever the audience would 
pick, and Jim Cornette cut a promo to make sure the fans picked him. Bedlam then came into the cage 
with Cornette and the Funks locked the door to make it a two-on-one. Eventually White Boy still pinned 
Cornette to win the match and the Funks ran in to make it 4-on-1 until the other faces came in for the 
save. On 7/3 in Marietta before 445 fans, only 20 minutes from Roberts' home in Stone Mountain, Roberts 
left word that if they wanted him, he'd be there and word was left on his answering machine that they 
wanted him there and he wasn't there again. Once again Bedlam, who lost to Smothers in about 5:00 
earlier in the show, lost again to White Boy in a 5:00 cage match. Roberts finally contacted the promotion 
on 7/4 saying that his wife had difficulty with her pregnancy. Cornette said that if Roberts' story was true, 
it was a very legitimate excuse for not being there and would have been no problem, but he was more 
upset about Roberts never giving them a reason until four days later and never leaving word that he 
wouldn't be at the shows or returning the numerous phone calls made to him to find out what was going 
on. 

At the 7/5 television tapings, White Boy came out with the SMW title, doing an interview saying how he had 
beaten Roberts for the title "this past week" in a fictitious match and gained revenge for his wife (whom 
Roberts DDT'd) and that was all that was mentioned about Roberts. Terry Gordy is being brought in for the 


8/5 Knoxville show to challenge White Boy for the title and Roberts after that interview was never referred 
to again at the tapings, basically meaning he's been written out of the script. The original plan apparently 
was going to have White Boy taking the title on 8/5 in Knoxville. 
to again at the tapings, basically meaning he's been written out of the script. The original plan apparently 
was going to have White Boy taking the title on 8/5 in Knoxville. 

*********************************************************** 

This is the final issue of the current four-issue set. If you've got a (1) on your address label it means your 
Observer subscription expires with this issue. Starting with next week's issue we'll be expanding to 12 
pages, which means we'll have a lot more space for letters from readers and for want ads. Even with the 
added news coming from the McMahon trial, I suspect that we'll have more space allotted to letters than 
anytime before, so the odds of getting letters printed will be greatly increased starting next week. We 
haven't run want ads for several weeks due to space limitations, but starting next week we'll devote a half-
page to them each issue until we're caught up. Renewal rates within the United States, Canada and Mexico 
remain $8 for four issues, $15 for eight, $22 for 12, $28 for 16, $42 for 24, $56 for 32 up through $70 for 

40. Rates for the rest of the world are $11 for four, $21 for eight, $30 for 12, $40 for 16, $60 for 24, $80 
for 32 up through $100 for 40 issues for weekly airmail delivery. All subscription renewals, letters to the 
editor, reports from live shows and any other correspondence related to this publication should be sent to 
the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228. 
Fax messages can be sent to the Observer after Noon Eastern time (9 a.m. Pacific) on a daily basis at 408378-
6562. Phone messages can be left 24 hours a day at 408-379-8067. For the most up-to-the-minute 
news, I'm on the Real Wrestling Hotline (900-903-9030/99 cents per minute) every Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday. 

RESULTS 

6/12 El Toreo in Naucalpan (UWA/AAA Double Power): Nuevo Audaz & The King & Gama b Tony 
Arce & Vulcano & Rocco Valente, Negro Navarro & El Signo & Rocky Santana b Latin Lover & Volador & 
Fantasma-DQ, Los Villanos III & IV & V d Fuerza Guerrera & Mascara Ano 2000 & Universo 2000, Canek & 
Dos Caras & Gran Hamada b Perro Aguayo & Fishman & Cien Caras 

6/12 Arena Coliseo in Mexico City (EMLL): La Diabolica & Reina Jubuki (Akira Hokuto) b La Sirenita & 
Cynthia Moreno, Panico & Guerrero de la Muerte & Archangel de la Muerte b Trueno & Justiciero & Javier 
Valaguez, Bestia Salvaje & Mocho Cota & Sangre Chicana b Ringo Mendoza & Ciclon Ramirez & Pantera II, 
Ultimo Dragon & La Fiera & Vampiro Canadiense b Negro Casas & Samson Fuyuki & Black Magic, Hair vs. 
hair: El Cafre b Javier Rocca 

6/14 Arena Coliseo in Mexico City (EMLL -1,500): Cicloncito Ramirez & Aguilita Solitaria b Guerrerito 
Maya & Jaque Matito, Legendario & Mestizo & Olimpus b Kundra & Astro Jr. & Rey Bucanero, Kung Fu & 
Guerrero del Futuro & Cadaver de Ultratumba b Trueno & Aguila Solitaria & Americo Rocca, Jaque Mate & 
Halcon Negro Jr. & Espectro Jr. b La Sombra & Apolo Dantes & El Hijo del Solitario, El Texano & Silver King 
& Ultimo Dragon b Negro Casas & Mano Negra & Black Magic 

6/14 Pachuca (UWA/AAA Double Power -2,400): Falcon & Tiger Man & Aguila de Acera b Bull Power 
& Famoso & Tigre Astro, Rudy Reyna & My Flowers & Pimpinela Escarlata d Casandro & Adrian El Exotico & 
Sexi Pisces, Non-title: Octagon & Solar I & Super Amigo b El Signo & Negro Navarro & Rocky Santana, UWA 
jr. lt hwt title: Gran Hamada b Fuerza Guerrera 

6/16 La Pista Arena Revolucion Mexico City (EMLL -100): Los Kid Guerreros I & II b Thor & Fuego 
Salvaje, Hector Garza & Bronce & Valiente b Javier Cruz & Kraeno & Tornado Negro I, El Texano & El Brazo 
& Brazo de Oro b Angel Blanco Jr. & Emilio Charles Jr. & Cruz, Silver King b Pierroth Jr. 

6/16 Manuels, NF (Newfoundland Wrestling Federation -68): Vince Austin b Out of the Blue, Jack 
Ryder & John Henrikson b Drakar & Maj. Holocaust, Rob Victory b Venom-DQ, Iceberg b Epitat, Dean Gunn 
& Blackjack Davidson, Deaddie Freddie b Chi Chi Dillus, Gunn won Royal Rumble 

6/17 Arena Mexico in Mexico City (EMLL): Reyna Jubuki & La Diabolica b Lady Apache & Cynthia 


Moreno, Panico & Archangel de la Muerte & Guerrero de la Muerte b Trueno & Mascara Magica & Metalico, 
Ciclon Ramirez & El Hijo del Solitario & Hayabusa b Javier Cruz & Mogur & Espectro Jr., Mocho Cota & 
Bestia Salvaje & Emilio Charles Jr. b Ringo Mendoza & La Fiera & Brazo de Plata, Vampiro Canadiense & 
Atlantis & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. b Dr. Wagner Jr. & Samson Fuyuki & Black Magic 
Ciclon Ramirez & El Hijo del Solitario & Hayabusa b Javier Cruz & Mogur & Espectro Jr., Mocho Cota & 
Bestia Salvaje & Emilio Charles Jr. b Ringo Mendoza & La Fiera & Brazo de Plata, Vampiro Canadiense & 
Atlantis & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. b Dr. Wagner Jr. & Samson Fuyuki & Black Magic 

6/17 Netzahualcoyotl (UWA/AAA Double Power -3,000): Mohawk & Kraken b Blackbirds I & II, 
Elvis & Marabunta & Canalla I b Seminarista & Nuevo Audaz & Rayo Tapatio II, Adrian El Exotico & Sexy 
Pisces & Spartaco b Santa Esmerelda & La Beba & Baby Sharon, Los Payasos b Transformer & The King I & 
Black Power II, Canek & Villano III & Gran Hamada b Perro Aguayo & Fishman & Tinieblas Jr. 

6/18 Los Angeles (GAME): Vandal Drummond b Terry Iwakura, Makoto Muraoka b Benson Lee, 
Chamaco Torres (Super Boy) b Renegado Estrada, Greg Regalado b Magneto, Iwakura & Muraoka b 
Drummond & Lee, Doug Williams b Al Burke, Kit Thorne b Golden Boy, Torres b Regalado 

6/19 El Toreo in Naucalpan (UWA/AAA Double Power -6,000): Gallego & Angel Mortal & Mr. 
Condor b Aguila Negra & Gran Apaches I & II, The King I & Black Power II & Seminarista b Picudo & 
Maremoto & Terremoto, El Signo & Negro Navarro & Rocky Santana b Solar I & Super Muneco & Rey 
Misterio Jr., Octagon & Lizmark & Mascara Sagrada b Los Villanos III & IV & V-DQ, Double Power Cup: 
Perro Aguayo b Canek 

6/24 Sunrise, FL (Hardcore Pro Wrestling): Soulman Alex G b Pat Price, Painting Contractors b Bobby 
Wales & Les Adams, Dr. Ric Montana b Darryl D, Miser Moore b T.J. Jackson, Johnny Evans & Preston Plum 
b J.R. James & Mr. Right 

6/25 Alma, GA (All-Star Wrestling): Scott Studd b Luscious Lonnie, Bambi b Peggy Lee Leather, Rob 
Van Dam b The Punisher (Ray Lloyd), Dick Slater b Too Cold Scorpio 

6/26 Philadelphia (ECW TV taping -400): Cage match: Shane Douglas & Mr. Hughes b Bruise 
Brothers, Axl & Ian Rotten b Don E. Allen & Joel Hartgood, J.T. Smith b Dino Sanoff, Public Enemy b Phi 
Delta Slam, ECW TV title: Mikey Whippreck b Pit Bull #2-DQ, Dory & Terry Funk b Steve Richards & Hack 
Myers, Sabu b Chad Austin, ECW title: Tommy Dreamer b Shane Douglas-DQ, Bruise Brothers b Hartgood & 
Sanoff, Bad Breed b Spiders, ECW TV title: Whippreck b Sandman-DQ, Rockin Rebel b Austin, Funks & 
Dreamer b Public Enemy & Myers, Pit Bulls b Phi Delta Slam, Tazmaniac b Jimmy Snuka 

6/27 Kyoto (FMW -2,867): Masato Tanaka b Tetsuhiro Kuroda, Miwa Sato b Yoshika Ishikura, Mitsuhiro 
Matsunaga & Mr. Gannosuke b Big Titan & Ricky Fuji, Megumi Kudo & Yukie Nabeno & Nurse Nakamura b 
Crusher Maedomari & Shark Tsuchiya & Tsuppari Mack, Dr. Luther b Damian, Hisakatsu Oya & Goro 
Tsurumi b Tarzan Goto & Gosaku Goshogawara, Street fight: Atsushi Onita & Sambo Asako & Katsutoshi 
Niiyama b Mr. Pogo & The Gladiator & Hideki Hosaka 

6/28 Osaka (FMW -2,200 sellout): Hideki Hosaka b Tetsuhiro Kuroda, Nurse Nakamura b Yoshika 
Ishikura, Gosaku Goshogawara b Mr. Chin, Goro Tsurumi b Masato Tanaka, Big Titan & Dr. Luther & Ricky 
Fuji b Damian & Katsutoshi Niiyama & Koji Nakagawa, Captains fall match: Megumi Kudo & Miwa Sato & 
Yukie Nabeno b Crusher Maedomari & Shark Tsuchiya & Tsuppari Mack, Tarzan Goto b Mr. Gannsouke, 
Captains fall street fight: Hisakatsu Oya & The Gladiator & Mr. Pogo b Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Atsushi Onita 
& Sambo Asako 

6/30 Peterborough, ONT (WWF -2,000): 1-2-3 Kid b Kwang **1/2, Bushwhackers b Executioners 
(Duane Gill & Barry Hardy) -*****, Yokozuna b Typhoon -*****, Jeff Jarrett b Doink the Clown *, WWF 
womens title: Alundra Blayze b Luna Vachon *1/2, Lex Luger b Crush DUD, WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen 
Hart * 

6/30 Sendai (WAR -4,100 sellout): Nobukazu Hirai b Yuji Yasuraoka, World six man tag title one-night 
tournament: Gedo & Jado & Hiromichi Fuyuki b Hideo Takayama & Hiroshi Itakura & Yagushi, Bret Como & 
Lion Heart (Chris Jericho) & Dos Caras b Arashi & Ashura Hara & Super Strong Machine (30:00 draw, Como 
team advances via judges decision), Shiryu & Great Sasuke & Masao Orihara b Masanobu Kurisu & Koji 
Ishinirki & Takashi Ishikawa, Animal Hamaguchi & Koki Kitahara & Genichiro Tenryu b Ryo Myake & Kishin 


Kawabata & Kendo Nagasaki, Gedo & Jado & Fuyuki b Como & Lion Heart & Caras, Tenryu & Hamaguchi & 
Kitahara b Shiryu & Sasuke & Orihara, Rumi Kazama & Shinobu Kandori b Harley Saito & Eagle Sawai, Third 
place match: Sasuke & Shiryu & Orihara b Como & Lion Heart & Caras, Championship match: Gedo & Jado 
& Fuyuki b Tenryu & Hamaguchi & Kitahara 
Kitahara b Shiryu & Sasuke & Orihara, Rumi Kazama & Shinobu Kandori b Harley Saito & Eagle Sawai, Third 
place match: Sasuke & Shiryu & Orihara b Como & Lion Heart & Caras, Championship match: Gedo & Jado 
& Fuyuki b Tenryu & Hamaguchi & Kitahara 

6/30 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (All Japan -2,100 sellout): Mitsuo Momota b Masao Inoue, Yoshinari 
Ogawa b Kentaro Shiga, The Eagle & Johnny Smith b Kurt Beyer & Richard Slinger, Giant Baba & Rusher 
Kimura b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Satoru Asako & Ryakaku 
Izumida, Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Johnny Ace & Tom Zenk, Stan Hansen & Takao Omori b Kenta 
Kobashi & Tamon Honda, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Masa Fuchi b Mitsuharu Misawa & Jun Akiyama 
& Tsuyoshi Kikuchi 25:07 

6/30 Nagano (New Japan -2,450 sellout): Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Tadao Yasuda b Tokimitsu Ishizawa & 
Yuji Nagata, Hiroshi Hase b Michiyoshi Ohara, Power Warrior b Akitoshi Saito, Keiji Muto b Kengo Kimura-
DQ, Masa Chono b Tatsutoshi Goto, American Love Machine & Black Tiger & Max Moon b Shinjiro Ohtani & 
El Samurai & Jushin Liger, Too Cold Scorpio & Steve Regal b Tatsumi Fujinami & Osamu Kido, Nasty Boys b 
Masa Saito & Shinya Hashimoto, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka b Riki Choshu & Akira 
Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka 

7/1 Bushkill, PA (WWF Monday Night Raw tapings -1,600 sellout): Non-squash results: WWF 
title: Bret Hart b 1-2-3 Kid 25:00 ****1/2, Lex Luger DDQ Diesel, Yokozuna b Adam Bomb-COR, Tatanka b 
Nikolai Volkoff, WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart 

7/1 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (New Japan -2,000 sellout): Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Yuji Nagata b Tokimitsu 
Ishizawa & Shinjiro Ohtani, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga, Black Cat & 
American Love Machine & Black Tiger b Too Cold Scorpio & Jushin Liger & El Samurai, Osamu Kido b Kengo 
Kimura, Yoshiaki Fujiwara b Akitoshi Saito, Power Warrior b Tatsutoshi Goto, Keiji Muto & Masa Chono b 
Max Moon & Steve Regal, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka b Tadao Yasuda & Riki 
Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami, Nasty Boys b Shinya Hashimoto & Hiroshi Hase 

7/1 Katsuta (All Japan -1,800): Masao Inoue b Kentaro Shiga, Yoshinari Ogawa b Satoru Asako, Dan 
Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Kurt Beyer & Richard Slinger, Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen b Mitsuo Momota & 
Rusher Kimura, Johnny Ace & Johnny Smith b Masa Fuchi & Ryukaku Izumida, Giant Baba & Takao Omori b 
Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue b Jun Akiyama & Tamon Honda, 
Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Stan Hansen & Tom Zenk & The Eagle 

7/1 Knoxville (SMW -700): Penalty box match: Thrillseekers b Well Dunn, Rock & Roll Express & Bambi 
b Brian Lee & Chris Candido & Tammy Fytch, Dory & Terry Funk b Scott & Steve Armstrong, Dock fight: 
Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam, Cage match: Dirty White Boy b Bedlam 

7/1 Honjyo (All Japan women -1,260): Chapparita Asari b Kumiko Maekawa, Tomoko Watanabe b Rie 
Tamada, Suzuka Minami b Kaoru Ito, Kyoko Inoue & Toshiyo Yamada b Bull Nakano & Mima Shimoda, 
Yumiko Hotta d Takako Inoue 30:00, Manami Toyota & Sakie Hasegawa b Aja Kong & Etsuko Mita 

7/1 Dallas Sportatorium (GWF -1,150): Devon Michaels b Alex Porteau, Francis Buxton b Rick Garren, 
GWF tag title: Michael Hayes & Jimmy Garvin b Black Bart & Bill Irwin, Scott Putski b Marc Valiant, Irwin & 
Bart b Michaels & Garren, Terry Gordy b Moadib-DQ, GWF title: Chris Adams b Rod Price to win title, Cage 
match: Action Jackson b Iceman King Parsons 

7/1 Kumagaya (JWP): Prelim results unavailable, Commando Boirshoi b Hiroumi Yagi, Cutie Suzuki & 
Devil Masami b Hikari Fukuoka & Dynamite Kansai, Mayumi Ozaki b Plum Mariko 

7/1 Indianapolis (Championship Wrestling America): P.C. Austin b Flash Flannagan, Mike Samples b 
Gary Jones, Kevin Haste b The Comet (Derek Stone), Samples b Dan Childers, Danny Davis & Haste b The 
Phantoms (Troy Haste & Jerry Faith) 

7/1 Winnipeg (Rough House Rasslin): Gene Swan b Robbie Royce-DQ, Stan Saxon b Paul Marcoux, 


Chi Chi Cruz b Bruiser Bastien, Marcoux won boot camp Battle Royal 

7/2 Bethlehem, PA (WWF Challenge tapings -3,000/? paid): Non-squash results: Tatanka b IRS 
**1/2, Nikolai Volkoff b Virgil *1/2, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ **3/4, Lex Luger b Crush DUD, WWF 
title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart DUD 

7/2 Akita (New Japan -4,000 sellout): Tadao Yasuda & Yuji Nagata b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Tokimitsu 
Ishizawa, Too Cold Scorpio & Max Moon b Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga, Shinjiro Ohtani & Jushin Liger & El 
Samurai b Black Cat & American Love Machine & Black Tiger, Nasty Boys & Steve Regal b Takayuki Iizuka & 
Akira Nogami & Power Warrior, Riki Choshu b Tatsutoshi Goto, Tatsumi Fujinami b Kengo Kimura, Shinya 
Hashimoto b Akitoshi Saito, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka b Keiji Muto & Masa Chono 
& Hiroshi Hase 

7/2 Barbourville, KY (SMW -850): Penalty box match: Thrillseekers b Well Dunn, Rock & Roll Express 
& Bambi b Brian Lee & Chris Candido & Tammy Fytch, Scott & Steve Armstrong b Dory & Terry Funk-DQ, 
Dock fight: Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam, Cage match: Dirty White Boy b Jim Cornette 

7/2 Nashville (USWA -250): Doug Basham b Tony Falk *1/2, Spellbinder b Jeff Gaylord *1/4, Bert 
Prentice b Colorado Kid DUD, W*ING tag title: PG-13 b Nobutaka Araya & Takashi Okano ***1/4, Brian 
Christopher & Moondog Spot NC Tommy Rich & Doug Gilbert *** 

7/2 Isezaki (All Japan women -1,600): Rie Tamada b Kumiko Maekawa, Tomoko Watanabe b 
Chapparita Asari, Etsuko Mita b Kaoru Ito, Bull Nakano & Toshiyo Yamada b Takako Inoue & Manami 
Toyota, Suzuka Minami b Sakie Hasegawa, Yumiko Hotta & Kyoko Inoue b Aja Kong & Mima Shimoda 

7/2 Los Angeles (GAME -70): Benson Lee b Kid Pepe, Terry Iwakura b Vandal Drummond, Kit Throne b 
Kimera, Golden Boy b Makoto Muraoka, Al Burke b Doug Williams, Iwakura & Muraoka b Throne & Golden 
Boy, Chamaco Torres b El Capitan (Capitan Oro) 

7/2 Warsaw, IN (Championship Wrestling America -1,800 festival show): Troy Haste b Kevin 
Haste, P.C.Austin b The Comet, Flash Flannagan b Mike Samples, Danny Davis & Kevin Haste b Phantoms 

7/2 Centre, AL (Bama Pro Wrestling): Widow Maker b Jason Valentine, Rock Regal b Al Horn, Ken 
Arden b Big Bubba, Mr. Vain b Hit Man Michaels-DQ, Sam Colt & Cameron Colt b Bubba & Mike Mercedes 

7/3 Ocean City, MD (WWF Superstars taping): Non-squash results: Tatanka b Yokozuna-DQ, Jeff 
Jarrett DCOR 1-2-3 Kid, Jarrett b Kid, Bret Hart b Bob Backlund, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ, Lex 
Luger b Bam Bam Bigelow, WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart 

7/3 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (All Japan -2,100 sellout): Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Kentaro Shiga, The Eagle b 
Ryakaku Izumida, Tamon Honda & Yoshinari Ogawa b Richard Slinger & Johnny Smith, Giant Baba & 
Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Abdullah the Butcher & 
Giant Kimala II b Johnny Ace & Kurt Beyer, Kenta Kobashi & Satoru Asako b Masao Inoue & Akira Taue, 
Stan Hansen & Tom Zenk b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, Mitsuharu Misawa & Jun Akiyama b Toshiaki 
Kawada & Takao Omori 23:37 

7/3 Aomori (New Japan -3,550 sellout): Michiyoshi Ohara b Takayuki Iizuka, Akitoshi Saito b Akira 
Nogami, Tatsutoshi Goto b Osamu Kido, Black Tiger & American Love Machine & Too Cold Scorpio & Black 
Cat b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Tokimitsu Ishizawa & Shinjiro Ohtani & Yuji Nagata, Ohtani won Battle Royal, 
Power Warrior b Max Moon, Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga b Jushin Liger & El Samurai, Nasty Boys & Steve 
Regal b Tadao Yasuda & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami, Hiroshi Hase & Masa Chono & Keiji Muto & 
Shinya Hashimoto b Kuniaki Kobayashi & Shiro Koshinaka & Kengo Kimura & Great Kabuki 

7/3 Marietta, GA (SMW -445): New Jack & Sheik Mustapha b Scott Studd & Lee Thomas to win North 
Georgia tag titles, Penalty box match: Thrillseekers b Well Dunn, Ricky Morton & Bambi b Chris Candido & 
Tammy Fytch, Dock fight: Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam, Steve & Scott Armstrong b Dory & Terry Funk-
DQ, Cage match: Dirty White Boy b Bedlam 


7/3 Kanagawa (All Japan women -1,990): Chapparita Asari b Kumiko Maekawa, Yumiko Hotta & 
Etsuko Mita b Bull Nakano & Tomoko Watanabe, Aja Kong & Rie Tamada b Mima Shimoda & Sakie 
Hasegawa, Kyoko Inoue b Suzuka Minami, Manami Toyota & Takako Inoue b Toshiyo Yamada & Kaoru Ito 
Etsuko Mita b Bull Nakano & Tomoko Watanabe, Aja Kong & Rie Tamada b Mima Shimoda & Sakie 
Hasegawa, Kyoko Inoue b Suzuka Minami, Manami Toyota & Takako Inoue b Toshiyo Yamada & Kaoru Ito 

7/3 Palmetto, FL (Florida Wrestling Alliance): Bill Payne b Billy Mack, Chaos b Butch Long, Randy 
Fuller & Jimmy Watts b Rick Thames & Sonny T to win FWA tag title, Mr. Electricity b Lebanese Assassin, 
Haystacks Calhoun Jr. b Warlord-DQ to become first FWA champion 

7/3 Studio City, CA (Slammers): Hombre de Oro b Dynamite D, Verne Langdon & de Oro b Jeff 
Lindberg & Malicious Mike, Langdon b Mike-DQ 

7/4 Memphis (USWA): Jeff Gaylord b Bull Pain, Colorado Kid b Tony Falk, Doug Basham b Spellbinder, 
Reggie B. Fine b Koko Ware-DQ, USWA womens title: Debbie Combs b Susan Sapphire, Brian Christopher b 
Doug Gilbert-DQ, Tournament for so-called W*ING tag title (first team to win two matches in a row wins 
tournament): Eliminators b PG-13, PG-13 b Nobutaka Araya & Takashi Okano, Araya & Okano b Eliminators, 
PG-13 b Eliminators-DQ, PG-13 b Araya & Okano to win "titles," USWA title: Dream Machine b Moondog 
Spot, Unified title: Jerry Lawler b Tommy Rich-DQ, Elimination match: Rich & Gilbert & Machine b Lawler & 
Christopher & Spot 

7/4 Paintsville, KY (SMW -450): Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai (Bobby Blaze), Penalty box 
match: Thrillseekers b Well Dunn, Dock fight: Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam, Rock & Roll Express & 
Bambi b Brian Lee & Chris Candido & Tammy Fytch 

Special thanks to: Dan Parris, Scott Wallask, Greg Greenland, Steve "Dr. Lucha" Sims, Pete Botts, Gregg 
John, Shannon Rose, Gary Langevin, B.W. Brent, Steve Prazak, Luca Fino, Dan Goose, Bob Koenig, Frank 
Munguia, Dan Moreland, Steve Gerber, Bob Kindred, Kurt Brown, Dan Farren, Lou Pickney, Brian 
Hildebrand, Jesse Money, Grant Zwarych 

UWA 

The major break-up of the UWA/AAA promotional combine took place this past week. The signs had been 
obvious for weeks, since Canek's creating the Double Power cup gimmick for the 6/19 show seemed like a 
way for him to keep his UWA heavyweight title, which was one of the things promised to AAA in order to 
get Double Power off the ground. While there were numerous other reasons for the break-up, the straw 
that broke the camel's back was at the 6/26 El Toreo show where the main event was Canek defending 
against Perro Aguayo. It was apparently well known among the parties involved that Canek was going to 
put Aguayo over clean in a 2/3 fall match on 6/19 for the Double Power Cup, and in exchange, Aguayo 
would return the favor in the title match. Originally UWA promoter Carlos Maynes had promised Antonio 
Pena, in order to get cooperation for the Double Power cards which picked up attendance at the weekly 
UWA arenas, that in return for help that El Signo and Gran Hamada's hair would be given up to an AAA 
wrestler as would Canek's strap, but Canek then created the Double Power Cup so he could go over in the 
title match. As it turned out, on 6/26, Aguayo showed up at El Toreo claiming cracked ribs suffered four 
days earlier in Vancouver, WA on the show Tonya Harding was at, and said he couldn't wrestle, and that 
Mascara Ano 2000 would take his place and put Canek over. Canek was furious, since he had juiced heavily 
one week, done a stretcher job another, and finally put Aguayo over clean, and this was to be his turn to 
win and save face in his home arena. Obviously he was skeptical of Aguayo really being injured, since that's 
the nature of wrestlers, even though Aguayo came with X-rays. Canek wanted Aguayo to do an angle in the 
ring so Canek could at least claim the credit for injuring him in a pre-match angle to explain why the match 
wouldn't take place, but Aguayo refused to agree claiming he didn't want to risk further injury. So Aguayo 
came out live and told fans about his injury, and Mascara Ano 2000 worked the title match with Canek and 
of course lost. The AAA wrestlers all along were having problems working with UWA since they were 
working for less money on a per-match basis as they made on AAA shows, and of late they were also mad 
that when it came time for the UWA wrestlers to lose in front of their hometown fans, they continually 
wanted to do DQ finishes instead of pins or submissions. In addition, the AAA wrestlers wanted a larger 
percentage of the houses to make up for the fact they weren't getting paid their usual guarantees. After 
the 6/26 show, it was officially announced Double Power was over. 


Right after this announcement came the "En La Jugada" (equivalent to an ESPN Sports Look show in the 
U.S.) show on 6/28 which included wrestlers from all three promotions. The way the guests were broken 
up, Canek and Aguayo were on first with Canek calling Aguayo a coward for not wrestling at El Toreo on 
Sunday and Aguayo tried to defend himself talking about cracking his ribs in the U.S. four days before the 
match although apparently Canek got the better of the argument. Next up were Fuerza Guerrera (AAA 
union head besides being one of the group's top heels) and Rayo de Jalisco Jr. (one of EMLL's top faces). 
Guerrera verbally went after both Canek and Rayo, with his main points being that the AAA wrestlers were 
the best paid, had the best boss and was working in the best promotion, and ran down EMLL. Rayo said 
Guerrera was ungrateful since he got his start and push with EMLL. Both Konnan and Vampiro were out 
later, with the hosts asking Vampiro is he was going to jump to AAA and Vampiro said that he was only 
going to work AAA shows in Los Angeles (although there have been serious negotiations in recent weeks for 
Vampiro and Black Magic to jump, but the status seems to change almost daily on what will eventually 
happen). Konnan came out and mainly ran down Canek and defended Aguayo, saying that Canek was like 
a top quality Black & White television set, that he was great during his time but this is the era of color 
television, big screen television and we're in another era. Konnan also brought up that Aguayo beat Canek 
cleanly once, bloodied him once and beat him so badly he was carried out on a stretcher once, while Canek 
had done nothing to Aguayo, and given that, why would Aguayo be afraid to fight Canek. 
U.S.) show on 6/28 which included wrestlers from all three promotions. The way the guests were broken 
up, Canek and Aguayo were on first with Canek calling Aguayo a coward for not wrestling at El Toreo on 
Sunday and Aguayo tried to defend himself talking about cracking his ribs in the U.S. four days before the 
match although apparently Canek got the better of the argument. Next up were Fuerza Guerrera (AAA 
union head besides being one of the group's top heels) and Rayo de Jalisco Jr. (one of EMLL's top faces). 
Guerrera verbally went after both Canek and Rayo, with his main points being that the AAA wrestlers were 
the best paid, had the best boss and was working in the best promotion, and ran down EMLL. Rayo said 
Guerrera was ungrateful since he got his start and push with EMLL. Both Konnan and Vampiro were out 
later, with the hosts asking Vampiro is he was going to jump to AAA and Vampiro said that he was only 
going to work AAA shows in Los Angeles (although there have been serious negotiations in recent weeks for 
Vampiro and Black Magic to jump, but the status seems to change almost daily on what will eventually 
happen). Konnan came out and mainly ran down Canek and defended Aguayo, saying that Canek was like 
a top quality Black & White television set, that he was great during his time but this is the era of color 
television, big screen television and we're in another era. Konnan also brought up that Aguayo beat Canek 
cleanly once, bloodied him once and beat him so badly he was carried out on a stretcher once, while Canek 
had done nothing to Aguayo, and given that, why would Aguayo be afraid to fight Canek. 

The Killer, Enrique Vera and Andy Barrow are returning and negotiations are going on for Silver King & El 
Texano to jump back from EMLL. 

The Death Missionaries, El Signo & Rocky Santana & Negro Navarro captured the UWA trios belts from El 
Engendro & Shu El Guerrero & Scorpio Jr. on 6/6 in Puebla, while Casandro lost the UWA lightweight title to 
Seminarista on 6/14 in Queretearo. On the same card, the Death Missionaries lost a non-title match to 
Octagon & Super Amigo & Solar I, which was surprising only because on paper Super Amigo isn't even a 
pushed AAA wrestler and he was put over the UWA trios champs on their home court. 

In an interpromotional match which was reported in the papers as a classic, Gran Hamada retained the 
UWA jr. light heavyweight title beating Fuerza Guerrera on 6/14 in Pachuca. 

With the AAA vs. UWA feud dead, UWA is bringing in two green bodybuilders called Mr. Atlas (said to be a 
former Mr. Mexico) and Mr. Cybergenics who are going to get main event pushes, since unlike the U.S., the 
bodybuilding craze hasn't hit and been done to death here and obviously they are attempting to copy 
Konnan just like it was in the United States about nine years ago when every wrestler starting out it 
seemed filled themselves with juice and painted their face to copy the phenomenal success of the Road 
Warriors gimmick. 

Scorpio Jr. is out of action with a broken collarbone. 

EMLL 

Bobby Bonales, 77, one of the pioneers of Lucha Libre, passed away on 6/26 and they held a moment of 
silence in his honor on television over the weekend. Bonales, whose real name was Roberto Aceves, is 
thought of as one of the all-time great shooters of the 50s. In that era, the American wrestlers, who at the 
time were the dominant force in wrestling, used to consider Mexican wrestlers as second-rate (some still do 
today but in a lot of ways that's an example of living ones life with blinders on), but even the Americans 
were said to all respect Bonales, who in his prime feuded with the likes of Gory Guerrero and El Santo. His 
son Daniel was a silver medalist at 132 pounds in the 1984 Olympic Games, who at that time was the only 
Mexican ever to win an Olympic medal in wrestling. Bonales was a powerful figure in the EMLL office and in 
the Mexico City wrestling commission for decades. 

7/9 in Los Angeles at the Olympic Auditorium is Negro Casas vs. Ultimo Dragon, Blue Demon Jr. & El Hijo 
del Solitario vs. Enigma de Oro & Kayam (locals), Los Brazos vs. Mercenarios (Louie Spicolli & Billy Anderson 
& Tim Patterson) and Piloto Suicida & Mercurio vs. Bobby Bradley Jr. & Lover Boy. They've lowered G.A. 
prices to $10 for this show, but except for a great main event, the line-up has no depth at all and isn't 
going to draw. 


Pegasus Kid (Chris Benoit) returns 7/8 at Arena Mexico as part of a trios tournament. The tourney will 
include Silver King & Texano & Dandy, The White Wave (Angel Blanco Jr. & Gran Markus Jr. & El Hijo del 
Gladiador), Negro Casas & Mano Negra & Black Magic and Pegasus & Vampiro & Rayo. 
include Silver King & Texano & Dandy, The White Wave (Angel Blanco Jr. & Gran Markus Jr. & El Hijo del 
Gladiador), Negro Casas & Mano Negra & Black Magic and Pegasus & Vampiro & Rayo. 

Super Astro also returns on that show. 

EMLL officially stripped Canek & Wagner of the CMLL world tag team titles for lack of defenses, since 
UWA/EMLL relations evaporated a long time ago so Canek wasn't going to return and defend the straps, so 
they'll be holding a tournament soon. 

Biggest feud right now is Rayo & Atlantis vs. Miguel Perez & Ricky Santana. 

With the World Cup killing attendance, EMLL announced kids under 10 free at all arenas. 

The 10-year old son of Mascarita Magica, who was missing, was found alive in Tijuana, and has been 
returned home. 

EMLL announced its biggest show of the year will be on 9/23 at Arena Mexico, the 61st anniversary 
spectacular. 

Guerrero Negro (Hector Picaso) was temporarily paralyzed after missing a tope. He's no longer paralyzed, 
but his career is believed to be over. 

ALL JAPAN 

The new tour opened 6/30 at Korakuen Hall with Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Masa Fuchi beating 
Mitsuharu Misawa & Jun Akiyama & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi in the main event. 

Maunakia Mussmal (?, will try and get correct spelling next week) was introduced to the crowd at this show 
as the newest wrestler this group is training. He's actually a Japanese-American, just 18 years old, and last 
year was the Hawaiian state high school heavyweight champion in amateur. 

Misawa debuted a new finishing hold which was described to me as being a reverse of the Tiger driver, on 
the 7/3 Korakuen Hall show and used it to pin Takao Omori in a tag match where Omori teamed with 
Kawada against Misawa & Akiyama. 

Tom Zenk seemed to be receiving a medium level push on his return to this group after a four year 
absence. Zenk had to fly back in mid-tour for the trial and is expected to return once his testimony is 
completed. 

6/25 television show did a 2.1 rating. 

NEW JAPAN 

New tour here also started 6/30 in Nagano. This tour is being headlined by New Japan vs. Ishingun (ex-
Skinheads) feud. During the tour there will be 85 matches between the two sides and whichever group has 
the most wins when it is over is the winning group. They had five matches on the first night, with Hiroshi 
Hase pinning Michiyoshi Ohara, Power Warrior pinning Akitoshi Saito, Keiji Muto beating Kengo Kimura via 
DQ when Ohara interfered and Masa Chono making Tatsutoshi Goto submit to the STF in singles. However, 
Ishingun won the main event when Shiro Koshinaka & Great Kabuki & Kuniaki Kobayashi beat Riki Choshu 
& Takayuki Iizuka & Akira Nogami. 

The highlight of the opening night was the debut of American Machine (Love Machine), who got over strong 
as expected, teaming with Black Tiger & Max Moon to beat Shinjiro Ohtani & El Samurai & Jushin Liger 
when Machine pinned Ohtani. 

Nasty Boys are unbeaten thus far on this tour working mainly semifinals, with the biggest win over Shinya 
Hashimoto & Hase. On opening night they beat Hashimoto & Masa Saito, and Saito was injured and 


forfeited his matches against Ishingun for the next several days. 

Steve Regal is also being given a strong push working tag matches with Nasty Boys, Max Moon and Too 
Cold Scorpio. 

New Japan is pushing that Antonio Inoki is going to the United States to the Bash and will meet with Ted 
Turner and George Foreman. It has been Inoki's dream going back to the mid-70s to have a match with 
Foreman, and with his retirement months away, this is his last chance to put the deal together. 

Satoshi Kojima's bad neck won't allow him to return to stage one of the G-1 climax tournament on 7/8 and 
7/9 in Sapporo, so he'll be replaced in that elimination phase by Manabu Nakanishi. 

It looks as though with the AAA/IWA combine out the window, that AAA and New Japan are going to work 
together and in December many of the AAA big names like Konnan, Cien Caras, Machine, Psicosis, etc. will 
be brought in. 

6/25 television show headlined by Hashimoto vs. Choshu for the title did a 2.2 rating. 7/2 TV had the 
Michinoku Pro vs. New Japan eight-man as the headliner. 

OTHER JAPAN NOTES 

The biggest show of the past week in Japan was the WAR world six man tag team title one-night 
tournament on 6/30 in Sendai. The finals came down to Genichiro Tenryu & Animal Hamaguchi & Koki 
Kitahara vs. Gedo & Jado & Hiromichi Fuyuki. In an upset, Fuyuki's team won when Fuyuki pinned Kitahara, 
after Kendo Nagasaki had attacked Tenryu with a fire extinguisher blast to the eyes rendering him blind 
and giving Fuyuki's team a 3-on-2 edge. In the third place match, Great Sasuke & Shiryu & Masao Orihara 
beat Dos Caras & Brett Como & Lion Heart (Chris Jericho). Another six-man tourney takes place on 7/17, 
although no belts are at stake. The deal behind this is that in the late 1980s, Tenryu & Road Warriors held 
the NWA six-man belts are defended them both in Japan and NWA before the NWA/All Japan relations hit 
the skids when All Japan didn't want to work with the NWA group any longer when they did a Clash where 
they were supposed to defend the title against Sting & Junkyard Dog and a third guy (Michael Hayes?) and 
they did an angle where Kevin Sullivan locked the latter team up in the dressing room and conservative 
Baba felt any group that would run an angle like that was embarrassing the sport of wrestling and that was 
the end of a relationship that went back to the 50s. 

The latest FMW tour ended on 6/28 in Osaka with a captains fall street fight match (rules are each team 
picks a captain and the match can only end when one team captain pins the other team captain) where 
captain Hisakatsu Oya teamed with The Gladiator & Mr. Pogo to beat captain Mitsuhiro Matsunaga who 
teamed with Atsushi Onita & Sambo Asako. Next major show is 7/31 in Yokohama with Pogo & Oya 
defending the street fight tag titles in a barbed wire match against Onita & Matsunaga, an elimination street 
fight with Tarzan Goto & Asako & Mr. Gannosuke vs. Goro Tsurumi & Hideki Hosaka & Dark Ranger, a 
womens street fight eight-woman match plus the first singles meeting of Big Titan vs. The Gladiator, and 
Damian vs. Ginsei Shinzaki. The biggest FMW show of the summer will be on 8/28 in Osaka. 

LLPW announced this past week that the Shinobu Kandori vs. Bull Nakano main event on the 7/14 card, 
which is the group's biggest show in its history, will not be for the LLPW title as originally announced, but 
be a falls count anywhere chain match. 

Pancrase on 7/26 at Tokyo Komazawa Gym has Masakatsu Funaki vs. Scott Salbin (billed as the U.S. 
heavyweight champion in shoot kick boxing), Minoru Suzuki vs. Renco Parduel (who made it to the 
semifinals of Ultimate Fight II before losing to Royce Gracie), Wayne Shamrock vs. Bas Ruton and Yusuke 
Fuke vs. Jason DeLuca (who was in Ultimate Fight II and also lost to Gracie). 

Rings held a press conference on 7/4 announcing the signing of Tony Halme (Ludvig Borga). Halme was 
billed as the first pro wrestler to join Rings besides Akira Maeda. His first match will be 8/20 in Yokohama. 
Halme left the WWF when he broke his ankle, and must have been other problems which led to him not 
returning other than simply the gimmick wasn't nearly as successful as the spot it was given. 


IWA has a show at Korakuen Hall on 7/14 headlined by an Undertaker death match (loser must be stuffed 
into a coffin) with Jason the Terrible vs. Tracy Smothers plus the beginnings of its world title tournament. 
7/15 on an IWA show will be Canek vs. Jason for the UWA heavyweight strap and a barbed wire barricade 
match (a large slab of plywood is filled with barbed wire and the board can be used as a weapon) with 
Yukihiro Kanemura vs. Shoji Nakamaki and Smothers vs. Dick Slater. 
into a coffin) with Jason the Terrible vs. Tracy Smothers plus the beginnings of its world title tournament. 
7/15 on an IWA show will be Canek vs. Jason for the UWA heavyweight strap and a barbed wire barricade 
match (a large slab of plywood is filled with barbed wire and the board can be used as a weapon) with 
Yukihiro Kanemura vs. Shoji Nakamaki and Smothers vs. Dick Slater. 

NOW has a show on 8/11 headlined by Kendo Nagasaki vs. Yoshiaki Fujiwara. 

JWP will be doing an eight-woman singles tournament with the first round matches (Candy Okutsu vs. 
Hikari Fukuoka, Commando Boirshoi vs. Plum Mariko, Mayumi Ozaki vs. Cutie Suzuki and Dynamite Kansai 
vs. Devil Masami) taking place 8/8 at Tokyo Ota Ward Gym, semis on 8/20 in Omiya and finals on 8/21 at 
Korakuen Hall. 

Super Boy, Piloto Suicida and Ultra Taro are headed to Michinoku Pro starting 7/23. 

USWA 

Sid Vicious made his first appearance for a regular promotion on 7/4 in Memphis doing a run-in as Tommy 
Rich and Jerry Lawler were the final two wrestlers in an elimination tag match which started as Lawler & 
Brian Christopher & Moondog Spot vs. Rich & Doug Gilbert & Dream Machine. Vicious attacked Lawler, 
causing him to be pinned, which should no doubt set up a match on 7/11. 

Attendance has been surprisingly strong as a weak on paper line-up on 6/27 drew more than 1,300 fans. 

On television 7/3, Doug Basham came in and was announced as the nephew of Danny Davis, which is the 
case, and he looked good. Eddie Marlin then told the referees they needed to enforce the rules more 
closely. He called out all three USWA refs (Joe Wheeler of Louisville, Kevin Christian Lawler and Frank 
Morrell) and told them if they couldn't get the job done, he was hiring new referees and they all said they'd 
get the job done. Then they aired a clip from 6/27 of PG-13 retaining the USWA tag belts beating The 
Eliminators when they threw powder after Bert Prentice distracted the referee. After the match all three 
"injured" J.C. Ice so Wolfie D had to go on and wrestle Nobutaka Araya & Takashi Okano, known as the 
Masters of the Orient, by himself and he ended up losing. PG-13 then had a television rematch with 
Eliminators ending with Eliminators being disqualified. 

They then aired a clip from 6/27 of the main event with Lawler & Christopher teaming with a mystery 
partner, who turned out to be Phil Hickerson against Dream & Rich & Gilbert. Lawler wound up being 
handcuffed to the ropes by Rich and was pretty well destroyed. 

Lawler & Christopher then had a tag match against Masters of the Orient, ending when Gilbert, Rich & 
Dream attacked them and hung Lawler over the ropes. 

They announced that the bird Reggie B. Fine ate on television last week wasn't really Frankie and Fine is 
supposed to bring Frankie back to Koko Ware, but hasn't done so yet so they are still feuding. 

On the 7/4 card they had a three-way tag feud with Eliminators, PG-13 and Masters of the Orient for the 
supposed W*ING belts, with the first team to win two straight bouts getting the belts. It took five matches 
before PG-13 beat both the other teams in succession. Masters of the Orient return to Japan since IWA 
starts its new tour on 7/14. 

Nathaniel Whitlock, 35, who used to manage here as Nate the Rat, got a front page story about him in the 
6/30 Memphis Commercial Appeal. Whitlock ran after a woman who had stabbed a neighbor of his. 
Apparently the woman used a meatcleaver on the neck of his neighbor, who wasn't hurt seriously, then ran. 
Two years ago Whitlock was awarded a commendation from the city when he talked a man from jumping 
off a seventh floor of a parking garage. Whitlock, who called the police when the neighbor, covered in 
blood, ran to his doorstep. He then left the house and stalled the woman, who was running off, long 
enough by talking with her until police arrived. 


Apparently the woman using the Lady Satan name that had wrestled Debbie Combs a few weeks back 
wasn't Cora Combs. Cora has worked as Lady Satan before against Debbie but the women working this 
past week as Lady Satan have been Kitty Adams and Sara Lee. 
wasn't Cora Combs. Cora has worked as Lady Satan before against Debbie but the women working this 
past week as Lady Satan have been Kitty Adams and Sara Lee. 

SMW 

New Jack & Sheik Mustapha from North Georgia wrestling debuted at the 7/5 tapings as a heel tag team 
called The Gangsters and are going to get a strong push. 

Chris LePuma, who plays for the Atlanta Knights hockey team, was the guard of the penalty box for the 
Thrillseekers-Well Dunn match in Marietta. 

On that same show in the Scott & Steve Armstrong vs. Funk Brothers match, after the DQ finish, the Funks 
and Jim Cornette beat up Bob Armstrong, and then local wrestling personality Sam Kent ran in and they 
beat him up as well. This was to set up the return on 8/16 where Sam Kent will manage The American 
Patriot (local wrestler T.A. Golden) against Bruiser Bedlam managed by Cornette. 

On television this weekend they aired a FITE union video with Bruiser Bedlam and Killer Kyle, showing Kyle 
having a tug-of-war with four guys who couldn't move him, and Bedlam bracing himself against a wall with 
his legs locked holding the front of the car by the legs and them starting the car and having the wheels 
burn rubber (an old Ivan Putski gimmick from the 70s that was later done in the mid-80s on WWF TV by 
Ken Patera although in the case of Patera, it was a gimmicked scene). 

In the Legends update, they announced Nelson Royal, Doug Furnas and Dick Slater as being at the 8/5 
show. 

Tracy Smothers was scheduled to defend the TV title against James Atkins and Cornette came out and told 
Atkins he needed to go on strike because he wasn't getting enough benefits and vacation days and Kyle 
intimidated him and took the title match. The match was really bad, with Smothers winning, but after their 
was the big brawl where Bob Armstrong was bloodied and left the brawl, and then came back with a 
baseball bat and cleaned house, which is similar to what he did last summer. Bob then did an interview and 
said that Jim Cornette's mother would rue the day she was with the jackal who produced Jim. 

Jim Ross will be guest announcer for the 8/5 show. Apparently the interviews cut by Cornette and the 
Funks leading to that card are excellent, and they'd better be since Cornette is hoping for his first ever 
sellout in Knoxville. 

HERE AND THERE 

The Alexandria, LA Daily Town Talk had a story on Ernie Ladd on 6/22, talking about him being elected to 
the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. Ladd, who played in three all-star games in the old AFL before going into 
wrestling, was talked about as being a two sport star. Ladd walked away from football when he was still 
one of the most feared lineman in the game and into pro wrestling in the late 1960s and he was a main 
eventer until he knees gave out finally in the mid-80s. Ladd noted, "I'm very satisfied with my wrestling 
career. I enjoyed it much more than football." What was interesting was the story gave Ladd's wrestling 
career equal respect to his football exploits. 

Jim Crockett is planning on opening up his new promotion, which will be called Jim Crockett Promotions 
presents the NWA, in the Carolinas, Alabama and Georgia, with the first television taping on 7/26 
tentatively scheduled for Rainsville, AL. There are plenty of rumors over who will be involved in this group 
which will run in that area, but Paul E. Dangerously and the ECW crew that made up the bulk of the first 
Crockett tapings in New York won't be involved for a number of reasons, the main one being they had 
different ideas of the direction to take pro wrestling and how it should be presented. We really don't know 
any of the talent other than it is expected although not confirmed that some SMW talent may help with the 
first television taping and that Jim Cornette will likely appear. Ron West is getting the towns and Crockett is 
apparently going to be his own booker. The idea is to run a taping and one weekend a month of spot 
shows until the end of the year, when in theory they'll have television in a number of cities and run a 


circuit. 

Chris Adams captured the GWF title on 7/1 in Dallas from Rod Price before 1,150 fans. Michael Hayes 
worked his first match that night since back surgery, teaming with Jimmy Garvin to beat Black Bart & Bill 
Irwin. Terry Gordy did a big stretcher job after being attacked by Bart, Irwin and Moadib after a singles 
match with Moadib, with the angle being they blew out his knee. 

All-Star Wrestling has shows 7/16 in Brunswick, GA with Jim Duggan and Dory Funk appearing, and 7/23 in 
Calhoun Falls, SC with Wahoo McDaniel vs. Greg Valentine in a strap match on top. 

A correction from the 6/27 issue, the 6/19 San Jose show drew 325 paid and not 250 as reported. 

AAA 

Probably the biggest news involves attempts at raiding going on back-and-forth although at this point 
nobody has moved. As is well known, AAA has had serious negotiations with Vampiro and Black Magic in 
recent weeks and Vampiro is confirmed for the Los Angeles card, and over the past week really picked up 
the steam in trying to lure Negro Casas in to form a tag team with Heavy Metal (who is actually his younger 
brother Eric Casas). Casas is generally considered by wrestlers in Mexico as the best wrestler in North 
America and has a great rep also as a trainer and for booking ideas and in elevating workrates of others. In 
addition, they're making a play to bring in Dandy. Casas at press time had told those with AAA that he was 
90% sure he'd be coming in and some have pegged that he could be in as soon as the next two months. 

Juan Herrera, a former AAA front office worker who was the long-time payoff man for EMLL and who 
returned to a power position after splitting with AAA early in the year, contacted Mascarita Sagrada and 
made a major offer to get him to convince all the minis to jump back. Mascarita then contacted Fuercita 
Guerrera, Octagoncito, Jerrito Estrada and Espectrito. Octagoncito was the only one who turned him down 
immediately and the rest pretty well agreed to jump. Pena and Jerry Estrada had talks with Jerrito and 
Espectrito and believe they've got them convinced to stay after all. Pena threatened all of them saying that 
if they jumped, they wouldn't be welcomed back. They seem to believe that Mascarita won't jump if it's 
only Fuercita who will jump with him, although amidst all this comes word of a Mascarita Sagrada vs. 
Espectrito mask vs. mask match for 8/6 in Los Angeles. Mexican magazines have also reported Lizmark, a 
long-time big-name who is kind of lost in the shuffle in AAA, and Lizmark Jr., who is one of the best young 
wrestlers in the world, as being approached to join EMLL 

8/6 show at press time (and you know what that means), the line-up has Konnan & Jake Roberts vs. Perro 
Aguayo & Vampiro in a Parejas Increibles match (face + heel vs. face + heel which I guess casts Vampiro 
as a heel), minis mask vs. mask match which is probably the single most important midget match in the 
recent history of wrestling, El Hijo del Santo & Octagon & Rey Misterio Jr. vs. Los Payasos, Volador & Heavy 
Metal & Winners vs. La Parka & Psicosis & Misterioso, Lola Gonzales & Martha Villalobos vs. Magnificent 
Mimi & La Monster and prelims including Too Cold Scorpio and Tito Santana. It's a solid show but no Love 
Machine or Cien Caras, who are the top two heels in the promotion. Vampiro is on television in Los Angeles 
since EMLL is on Ch. 22 Sundays, but it's largely dead television in comparison. It's real interesting to see if 
he means anything since he was on top on the two EMLL shows in Los Angeles which didn't draw well. 

Sports Illustrated ran a scorecard item this past week about Tonya Harding being involved in the wrestling 
show in Vancouver, pretty well making fun of her involvement in a group which included the description of 
the dreaded midget in a green mask and orange wig (Espectrito) that made numerous newspapers around 
the country via AP. It's pretty much a definite that Harding won't be working the Los Angeles show since 
her agent asked for $7,500 and the offer made was $5,000. 

IWC promoter Ron Skoler tried to defend the New York ticket prices ($25 to $50) because of the cost of 
promoting a show in New York and that Mexican concerts with major bands sell tickets anywhere from $40 
to $100 in New York and draw big houses. The fact is, virtually all the tickets sold the first few days were 
the $50 seats, so if people are willing to buy the tickets, they aren't overpriced. Actually my problem at 
most big shows isn't the high price for ringside, it's when the low price is too high which often keeps the 
cheap seats from being sold and can discourage return business. Ringside at a major show is a sign of 


status and people will pay anything provided they believe the show is something special. When they don't 
and you find ringside empty and the cheap seats sold ala the EMLL shows in Los Angeles, then you know 
ringside is overpriced. 
and you find ringside empty and the cheap seats sold ala the EMLL shows in Los Angeles, then you know 
ringside is overpriced. 

Because of the World Cup shutdown, the weekend television was all old tapes. Galavision on Saturday aired 
three matches from the 3/12 Los Angeles show, including the Mascarita Sagrada-Espectrito title match 
which was the best minis match I've ever seen, and the Konnan-Jake cage match which wasn't the best 
anything although Mascarita did the Snuka dive off the cage. They also aired on U.S. television for the first 
time, the six-man from Los Angeles where Love Machine broke-up with La Parka & Psicosis after Lizmark 
put the La Parka mask on and attacked Machine with it, and Machine then attacked La Parka. The Sunday 
show in Mexico just aired prelim matches from prior tapings that hadn't aired previously. Because of not 
taping because of the World Cup and airing old tapes, it turned into a WCW-like television situation. The 
week after Mascarita Sagrada and Micro Konnan settled their feud, the television show aired a match taped 
one week earlier where Micro Konnan once again turned on Mascarita. 

New shows should start airing this weekend in Mexico and the weekend after in the United States, since 
they taped 7/1 in Veracruz (drawing a non-sellout 6,000 for a show with Konnan's team against Cien Caras 
and his brothers, ending when Los Payasos attacked both teams to continue a three-way feud), and were 
scheduled for tapings 7/6 in Aguascalientes and 7/8 in Tijuana, largely to give a new push to the newest 
version of the Infernales (Pirata Morgan & Espectro & El Satanico) who are heels on top of both shows. 
Originally Psicosis was a member of that trio instead of Morgan, but the change was made because it was 
felt Psicosis was just too good to be put in that grouping and that Morgan was an original Infernale (before 
he and Satanico broke up and feuded last year in a dud feud) and had no spot in the promotion without 
being part of a regular grouping. 

They are going back to running weekly Friday night shows at Juan de la Barrera Gym in Mexico City on 
7/15. 

WCW 

Hulk Hogan is scheduled to appear on Jay Leno on 7/12. Hopefully he'll have learned from 1991 and not 
repeat. 

Another employee defecting of late from the WWF, Tom Hunt, who handled a lot of the stage production 
for the recent Wrestlemania revenge tour, has joined WCW and will run the hotline. Speaking of the hotline, 
it is widely rumored that Mark Madden will be on the hotline in place of Bobby Heenan on Sundays, since 
Heenan's segment, despite all the publicity, pretty well has bombed when it comes to getting people to call. 
In nearly every case, wrestling heels or people acting like heels bomb on hotlines. On WCW, with the 
exception of Gene Okerlund on Saturdays who has the advantage of doing the teases on television, the only 
day that does strong business is Thursdays with Mike Tenay, who isn't a television personality, but has 
more news than anyone else. Okerlund only does roughly half the average business each week that Jim 
Ross did with far less promotion, because the teases can only sustain business for so long before people 
want info for their dollar which Ross delivered. Madden has been campaigning for the spot since December. 

A correction from last week. At the Clash, Tony Schiavone didn't call Shaquille O'Neal an "old pro" as 
reported here, it was "All-Pro," which is technically a football term but why quibble. 

The story about the fan going after Terry Funk with a gun in Columbus, GA at the TV taping was 
apparently blown out of proportion. There was a drunk biker who had a gun and it happened to be during 
the Terry Funk match when the police saw him and escorted him to the back, but it wasn't as if he 
charged the ring or anything. 

TV ratings for the weekend of 6/18 saw Saturday Night do a 1.8, Main Event a 1.9 and Pro a 1.5. For the 
weekend of 6/25, Saturday Night did a 2.1 and Pro another 1.5. 

Even though Hulk Hogan has been announced for the tours, the advance for WCW in Germany in 
September has been weak. WWF advance for Germany at the same time is also flat but reportedly their 


dates have more interest. 

The 8/25 Clash has been moved from the St. Paul Civic Center, the building Hulk Hogan used to sellout in 
the AWA in the early 80s. The show would have gone head-to-head with the opening of the state fair. No 
new site or card is known at press time, although the 9/18 PPV looks to be from Roanoke and Halloween 
Havoc is penciled in for Detroit. 

On WCW on 7/2, they aired a very brief clip of Hulk Hogan working out with George Foreman which was 
totally ineffective. Hogan then did an interview where Hulk told Jimmy Hart basically to punch Sherri Martel 
if she interfered, which is probably the worst timing in the world right now to say something like that. I'm 
sure TBS got complaints about that because we even received several complaints immediately after the 
interview. The Hogan-Flair build-up had been strong up to this past weekend, although probably not strong 
enough to justify the expense, but this week's television saw the hype fall flat. WCW officials are still 
predicting a 1.0 buy rate for the show, which would be a major success. 

Most of the post-PPV house shows will be Flair vs. Sting, Guardian Angel vs. Vader, Ricky Steamboat vs. 
Steve Austin, Marcus Bagwell & The Patriot vs. Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff, Dustin Rhodes vs. Arn 
Anderson, Johnny B. Badd vs. Steve Regal and Brian Pillman vs. Bobby Eaton. 

7/8 in Augusta, GA was canceled, so the next actual house shows are guaranteed shows on 7/14 and 7/15 
in El Paso and Albuquerque. WCW also has shows on 8/27 in Fort Worth at Will Rogers Coliseum and 8/28 
in Lancaster, CA as part of the county fair before a 9/1 to 9/14 tour of Germany. 

Stupid line of the week: On the hotline, Gene Okerlund claimed the trial was "a hatchet job by the feds on 
Vince McMahon because he ruffled the feathers of the Weider Brothers." Although this isn't the first time 
the line that the Weider Brothers are behind it has been espoused, but it is totally ludicrous on a number of 
points. The ridiculous Billy Graham to Weider Brothers going to Arnold going to George Bush conspiracy 
theory McMahon tried to advocate in 1992 when all the bad pub hit to attempt to deflect defending itself 
against the issues at hand has no basis in fact. The Weider Brothers have more to fear if the government 
goes after the real profiteers of steroids use then anyone, not to mention Bush isn't president anymore and 
it's ridiculous to believe he'd give one second of caring over an issue that petty. Besides, the Weider 
Brothers' feathers would hardly be ruffled by Vince McMahon since they scored a shutout victory over him 
on their field, and Vince was out of the bodybuilding business before the Grand Jury even started meeting. 
Yes, granted everything said in that venue and probably anything said by Gene Okerlund on just about any 
subject should probably be dismissed as all being a work, but he should at least leave the working 
storylines to involving the workers in the business instead of trying to explain real-life situations by creating 
works. 

Arn Anderson was on the Wrestling Insiders radio show and talked of forming a new Four Horseman group 
with Ric Flair and Curt Hennig, once Hennig's WWF contract runs out and he can join WCW. 

On both syndication and cable this past week they aired the previously taped and latest disjointed angle 
with Sensational Sherri scouting Brian Pillman and pretty much being in a babyface position, after she's 
already turned at the Clash. The announcers, put in a no-win position, tried to explain this faux pas by 
saying Flair is her business interest and she's looking at Pillman as a romantic interest. 

WWF 

Highlights of the recent television tapings. The Raw taping on 7/1 in Bushkill, PA opened with a Bob 
Backlund squash win where Backlund used the chicken wing and wouldn't let the hold go for a long time 
after the match and they rang the bell four or five times before he broke it, and he then ignored fans after 
the match. I'm told this wasn't taped, but was strictly a try-out, but after ten years, they finally got 
Backlund to do what they wanted him to do. Bret Hart vs. 1-2-3 Kid followed and they had a 25:00 super 
match. Owen Hart and Jim Neidhart caused a ruckus early but left. At 10:00, Hart scored a pin but Kid's 
foot was on the ropes and they built it from there ending when Kid missed a dropkick and submitted to the 
sharpshooter. Another Raw match was Lex Luger vs. Diesel ending in a DDQ when Razor Ramon and 
Shawn Michaels interfered. Alundra Blayze did an interview saying how she had finished off Luna, which will 


lead to Luna returning as the manager of Bull Nakano, who debuts at the 8/1 Raw taping in Youngstown, 
OH. They did promos on the third show building to Bull Nakano being on TV "next week." Jim Ross did the 
announcing for all three shows. Harvey Whippleman did a dark interview talking about Adam Bomb turning, 
so fans would know Bomb was a babyface but the fans really didn't get behind Bomb. Yokozuna beat Bomb 
via count out when Kwang tripped up Bomb. Ted DiBiase then promised he'd give Tatanka $10,000 if he 
could pin Nikolai Volkoff, and Tatanka scored the pin. Before DiBiase gave Tatanka the money he said that 
Tatanka could never beat Lex Luger, and Tatanka said he could beat Luger any day of the week, which 
brought out Luger. DiBiase was claiming he'd bought Luger's contract before Luger came out and Tatanka 
was agreeing, but Luger was noncommittal and when he was out, DiBiase changed his tune, but this all set 
up the Tatanka vs. Luger match at SummerSlam. 
OH. They did promos on the third show building to Bull Nakano being on TV "next week." Jim Ross did the 
announcing for all three shows. Harvey Whippleman did a dark interview talking about Adam Bomb turning, 
so fans would know Bomb was a babyface but the fans really didn't get behind Bomb. Yokozuna beat Bomb 
via count out when Kwang tripped up Bomb. Ted DiBiase then promised he'd give Tatanka $10,000 if he 
could pin Nikolai Volkoff, and Tatanka scored the pin. Before DiBiase gave Tatanka the money he said that 
Tatanka could never beat Lex Luger, and Tatanka said he could beat Luger any day of the week, which 
brought out Luger. DiBiase was claiming he'd bought Luger's contract before Luger came out and Tatanka 
was agreeing, but Luger was noncommittal and when he was out, DiBiase changed his tune, but this all set 
up the Tatanka vs. Luger match at SummerSlam. 

Speaking of SS, two other matches are Undertaker vs. Undertaker, which they did nothing to build-up at 
any of the three nights surprisingly, and Brian Lee only worked the third night since he worked SMW the 
other two nights, however the WWF Mag which hit the subscribers last week already had that match listed, 
and Bret vs. Owen in a cage. Remember when cages used to mean a clean finish in the ring with nobody 
running away and no outside interference? Today a cage guarantees running away and outside 
interference, which may explain why the cage doesn't draw anything like it used to. 

From the 7/2 Challenge tapings in Bethlehem, PA, after a Diesel win, Shawn Michaels came into the ring 
and pinned the fallen jobber. Volkoff beat Virgil when DiBiase distracted Virgil in a poor match. Yokozuna 
won a squash and tried to continue beating on the guy when Mabel, Oscar and Typhoon came out and 
Oscar rapped and Mabel and Typhoon danced. This is to set up Mabel & Typhoon as a regular tag team 
(thank god, we are really short this year on legitimate tag team of the year contenders) to feud with Crush 
& Yokozuna. Ray Rougeau & Jim Powers won a squash as a tag team. During this match several fans were 
heckling Powers on his physique and he flipped them off. Bam Bam Bigelow was managed by Ted DiBiase 
but no Luna. Yokozuna & Crush beat Mabel & Typhoon. Jim Neidhart, with Owen in the corner, came out 
for a squash win to the same Hart Foundation music that Bret uses. Owen then did an interview and said 
at SummerSlam he'd get back at his older brother for picking on him when they were kids and Bret came 
out and told Owen that he was being brainwashed by Neidhart and that his win at Wrestlemania was a 
fluke and said his sister was stupid for ever marrying Neidhart. Lots of complaints about the dark main 
event where Bret beat Owen with the sharpshooter in just a few minutes of a dud match. 

At the Superstars taping on 7/3 in Ocean City, MD, they started a Jeff Jarrett-Kid feud. First they had a 
double count out and Jarrett destroyed Kid similar to King of the Ring afterwards. Later in the taping they 
had a rematch which Jarrett won with his feet on the ropes. They continued the Lex turn tease with Luger 
saying he had no deal with DiBiase and Lex and Tatanka having another confrontation because Tatanka 
claimed he sold out to DiBiase. Since Luger is working face for September dates in Europe, this looks like a 
fake turn. They also did a Bob Backlund turn, although again we're told this may not air. Backlund got a 
small package but Hart kicked out, but Backlund thought he'd won. Hart then got a small package for the 
pin. After the match when they went to shake hands, Backlund slapped Hart and put him in the chicken 
wing and wouldn't break the hold. 

Although many TV Guides are listing a WWF special for 7/30 on Showtime, it won't be happening. There 
were negotiations several weeks back and somebody apparently jumped the gun, because no deal was 
completed nor is one expected to be. 

Upcoming tapings are 8/1 in Youngstown, OH, 8/2 in Wheeling, WV and 8/3 in Cincinnati, and then 8/15 
and 8/16 in Lowell, MA and 8/17 in Portland, ME. 

It is pretty well confirmed that the state athletic commission that Howard Finkel took the HIV test for 
Hogan was for his license in Oregon. 

Bruce Hart is coming in to be in Bret's corner for house show matches starting the end of the month 
against Owen, who will have Neidhart in the corner. 

They are actually doing a Jerry Lawler vs. Duke Droese feud at the arenas. 


For the weekend of 6/20, Raw did a 3.0, All-American a 2.0 (for the live show day of KOTR) and Mania a 

1.4. 6/27 saw Raw do a 3.3 for Mabel vs. Bigelow, All-American 1.9 and Mania 1.3. Both Raw shows 
actually were viewed by more people than the Clash on 6/23. 
DiBiase has replaced Johnny Polo on All-American. 

Davey Boy Smith is booked for England shows in September teaming with Bret against Owen & Neidhart on 
top, plus Undertaker vs. Yokozuna casket matches and Blayze vs. Nakano and Ramon vs. Diesel or Ramon 
& Luger vs. Michaels & Diesel. However on the Germany dates, it'll be Hart teaming with Randy Savage. 
There is serious talk of Smith returning full-time in the fall. 

John Fillipelli, who is now working in baseball production but was head of production with Titan for several 
years, in his baseball bio, the years he worked for Titan are left blank as if he just disappeared off the face 
of the Earth for several years. Apparently in Shawn Mooney's bio, it's the same situation. 

Early week house show business was largely very weak, in the $11,000 to $25,000 range except a decent 
house in Fresno and a strong house in Rancho Cucamonga ($54,000) promoted hard off the Los Angeles 
television. 

The 7/30 Oakland date for "Summer Sizzler" will be at the Kaiser Convention Center rather than the regular 
Coliseum Arena. 

Monster Madman, who didn't appear at any of the three shows, is apparently a relative of former wrestler 
Johnny Rodz. 


__________________

3 NBA Champion (1981, 1984, 1986)
3 NBA Most Valuable Player (19841986)
12 NBA All-Star (19801988, 19901992)
2 NBA Finals MVP (1984, 1986)
9 All-NBA First Team (19801988)
All-NBA Second Team (1990)
3 NBA All-Defensive Second Team (19821984)
NBA Rookie of the Year (1980)
NBA All-Rookie First Team (1980)
NBA All-Star Game MVP (1982)
3 Three-point Shootout champion (19861988)
21,791 Points
5,695 Assists
8,974 Rebounds
NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

33 Larry "Legend" Bird

Dave Meltzer > You

Follow Me On Twitter:@AirJordanFan93
666_The_Game_666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 05:43 AM   #175 (permalink)
Vince gives me a comedy gimmick
 
666_The_Game_666's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6,121
666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

July 18 1994 Observer Newsletter: Trial of Vince McMahon
continues, Hogan vs. Flair in WCW looming, terrible ratings and
finger-pointing, more (Daves Coverage Of McMahon Trial Part 2)


Code:
Wrestling Observer Newsletter 

POBox1228,Campbell,CA95009-1228July18,1994 

This should be a defining week in the history of American pro wrestling with the two largest U.S. 
promotions looking straight into the eyes of either potential disasters or potential major victories, the end 
results of which will largely tell the tale of the two biggest promotions in the United States and two biggest 
mat news stories in this country of 1994. 

The most powerful promoter and largest wrestling company in the country and in some ways, the world, is 
on trial and facing a potential lengthy prison term. In addition, World Championship Wrestling, with the 
Hulk Hogan vs. Ric Flair Bash at the Beach PPV match on 7/17, is facing a trial of its own, a financial one. 
The negative ramifications aren't in the ballpark as McMahon's, but as of the weekend, it's odds of success 
at the end appeared smaller. 

************************************************************ 

The trial of Vince McMahon and Titan Sports on charges of possession with intent to distribute and 
conspiracy to distribute anabolic steroids continued on Thursday and Friday in Uniondale, NY. The main 
witness both days was Dr. George Zahorian, the steroid doctor who has been in prison for his distribution of 
steroids and barbiturates to four pro wrestlers and a college strength coach for the past two-and-a-half 
years following a much-publicized 1991 trial that in many ways changed both the face and indirectly the 
level of popularity of American pro wrestling. 

Because the trial is expected to heat up early in the week with many prominent wrestling names testifying. 
This issue is being done a few days earlier and I want to thank all our regular correspondents for doing 
such a great job in helping me get the info in time to put out a complete issue early. I'll be traveling to 
New York after this issue goes to press early. For subscribers of Pro Wrestling Torch, which has been an 
invaluable help to our own coverage of this case, if this week's issue arrives late or if a week is skipped, it 
is because its two leading writers are in New York for the trial but they will be attempting to do an issue 
from the road if at all possible. All plans of this nature for both this publication and the Torch are subject to 
change, but next week's issue of the Observer could be several days late if the trial doesn't end by Friday. 
As of the end of testimony on Friday, several of the attorneys involved were confident the trial would 
conclude by the end of this week, which would mean no delay in next week's issue. Thus far the trial has 
gone at a snail's pace. Many of you probably will be able to ascertain the timing of the trial because with 
the O.J. Simpson hearings over, the New York media and wire service which haven't covered this case after 
the first day, are expected to pick back up coverage, particularly when Hogan takes the stand. Media 
coverage of this trial has mainly been limited to New York, and a few national television spots. Many in the 
New York media, focusing so heavily on the Simpson case, didn't have the time in their newscasts nor did 
they believe the public would be interested in a trial at the same time as the Simpson hearings. Several of 
the reporters who had been following this case from its early stages were transferred to covering the 
Simpson case. My expectation is that national coverage will be en masse the day that Hogan appears, and 
there will be limited coverage in the New York area of the rest of the proceedings. 

The spectators in the courtroom were largely autograph-seeking wrestling fans, giving their support and 
looking for autographs from McMahon, clad in a neck brace courtesy of his recent operation for a herniated 
disc and reporters. The crowd ooed and aahed when, for example, Nailz accidentally wandered into the 
courtroom, or someone like Afa the Samoan showed up to give McMahon well wishes. Most were largely 
bored by the proceedings, and complained that not enough wrestlers were there. 


Key points after the first three days of testimony: 

*Up to this point, the two distribution charges, which technically are possession with intent to distribute, of 
McMahon to Hulk Hogan have barely been addressed so almost all testimony relevant to the case (and 
much of the questioning and testimony at this point doesn't appear to even be relevant) regards the 
conspiracy charge. 

*In no way has the government presented a strong case of a conspiracy. There was definitely no traditional 
conspiracy when you think of the word, which was people getting together and plotting to get something 
accomplished. Titan Sports was not involved in any profit-sharing of the steroid revenue derived from its 
wrestlers, which may be a key point, although virtually all this was well-known by anyone who has been 
following the story from the beginning. The argument that it profited from the drug use at the other end, 
through ticket sales, merchandise sales or whatever, needs to be a strong convincing argument to get a 
conviction on this point. Even if there is a strong and convincing argument to that point, that still doesn't 
guarantee a jury will be able to take it in its proper context if that is its proper context with no 
understandings of the industry or even that if it could understand it in its proper context that it would 
consider conspiracy an applicable term. Up to this point, no argument has been presented to educate the 
jury toward the machinations of the wrestling industry. One would have thought Zahorian needed to be a 
key prosecution witness for get a conspiracy conviction but nothing he's said appears to have implicated 
anyone in anything more than many officials at Titan Sports allegedly knew what was going on and did 
nothing to stop it. Quite frankly, after three days of testimony, nothing has come out that could be 
considered as either a major unknown point or surprising on either side other than those in the jury 
probably believe, based on the testimony and witnesses presented, that wrestlers as a whole are a bunch 
of druggies, that Zahorian was a hardcore drug dealer and that the wrestling industry was filled with drugs 
and Titan was aware of it and did nothing to stop it but that nobody from Titan told anybody to do 
anything, thus the wrestlers and the doctor were largely acting on their own. The ties to McMahon being a 
puppeteer orchestrating this, which has to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, haven't even been more 
than barely touched upon, let alone had any significant points made pointing in that direction. It has been 
testified by Dr. Zahorian that McMahon and several Titan agents of executives, including Pat Patterson, Jay 
Strongbow and Arnold Skaaland were well aware of Zahorian selling steroids to wrestlers and that McMahon 
himself at one point was asked directly by Zahorian if he wanted him to stop and McMahon, according to 
Zahorian's testimony, told him to continue, although Zahorian plead his case in order to continue by 
warning McMahon about possible dangers if the wrestlers went the black market route for their steroids. In 
fact, Zahorian sold steroids not only to McMahon, as McMahon has admitted from the start, but also to 
Strongbow, for his son Mark, who wrestled briefly in WWF, WCW and Alabama as Mark Young and Vince 
Young, and to Skaaland for his son George, a WWF jobber in the early 80s. Another key point is that both 
McMahon and Titan Sports are on trial. With the two charges of distribution from Titan to McMahon dropped 
on account of McMahon being 100% owner of Titan, it may mean that legally a strong case could be made 
for a conspiracy if it the jury believed what the agents did constituted conspiracy since they were 
employees and officers in a supervisorial role with the company. What happened during that period, when 
the laws on steroids differed, could very well be considered a felony under today's laws, but those aren't 
applicable to the period in question. Today, aiding and abetting use of steroids, which there is a stronger 
case here for than conspiracy, would be a felony. 

*Most courtroom observers who have been in-and-out believe the defense (Titan's side) is killing the 
prosecution, although none have witnessed all the testimony 

*The only person we know of besides those involved in the case that has seen all three days from start-tofinish, 
Wade Keller, the editor of the Torch, said that his feelings at this point are that Zahorian has come 
off as a credible witness and that the Titan attorneys, Jerry McDevitt in particular, attempts to impugn his 
credibility have largely cost them points with the jury. He said it has come across in his testimony that 
Zahorian has at all times attempted to tell the truth. He believes the jury at this point probably has no idea 
what's going on and said that the prosecution doesn't appear to be phased by anything that has come out. 
The burden of proof, of course, is on the prosecution and at this point they've proven nothing. Keller says it 
appears this is part of a game plan and that their case to this point has been to simply lay groundwork and 
that who appears to be winning day-to-day is irrelevant until all the evidence is in and the trial is 


completed. He believes the defense is not even attempting to argue this case based on logic or facts but is 
emphasizing points that are actually irrelevant or as he termed it, "intellectually dishonest." However, the 
defense isn't attempting to win a debate, they're attempting to get a man acquitted by a jury with no 
background of the situation. He believes though it isn't either relevant or prudent to judge the case at this 
point, but if pressed, he would have the prosecution slightly ahead when it comes to relevant points made 
in arguments but not ahead enough to prove anything beyond a reasonable doubt and feels that the jury at 
this point has no evidence McMahon is guilty of anything. 
emphasizing points that are actually irrelevant or as he termed it, "intellectually dishonest." However, the 
defense isn't attempting to win a debate, they're attempting to get a man acquitted by a jury with no 
background of the situation. He believes though it isn't either relevant or prudent to judge the case at this 
point, but if pressed, he would have the prosecution slightly ahead when it comes to relevant points made 
in arguments but not ahead enough to prove anything beyond a reasonable doubt and feels that the jury at 
this point has no evidence McMahon is guilty of anything. 

*Without being there, but being aware of much of the testimony, my feeling is that the key points we 
expected going in when it comes to guilt or innocence in a courtroom, as opposed to real life, will be the 
key. The government has not presented much of a compelling case when it comes to the points they need 
to get across for a conviction. Titan Sports was not involved in a direct economic conspiracy to sell steroids, 
did not share in any profits, did not order Zahorian to sell steroids to its wrestlers and in the case of every 
wrestler testifying so far, although Rick Rude may be an exception, did not tell wrestlers directly to get on 
steroids. The company was aware of it going on and did nothing to deter it, either. Realistically use was 
encouraged, and even if you aren't willing to accept that, it has to be accepted that in no way was use 
discouraged nor can a valid argument be made that those in charge didn't know there were a lot of 
wrestlers using steroids. During that time period, the same can be said for every wrestling promotion in the 
world, with the only difference being Titan had Zahorian in its dressing room, but he was not assigned by 
Titan, but by the athletic commission. But the manner of encouragement was subtle enough that from the 
start I believed it would be extremely difficult to convince anyone except a group of people who follow the 
business closely understanding both wrestling and steroids and the psychology of each and impact of 
steroids on the industry and the impact of pushing wrestlers on steroids as to encouragement without 
saying so to younger wrestlers looking for a break to take the same route. That encouragement to younger 
wrestlers looking for work is still a part of the business today since both size and a muscular physique are 
still a strong advantage in getting a job with major offices both in this country and Japan. The prosecution 
has not even begun to bring up the points it needs to win the case, while the defense has proven beyond 
any doubt that no traditional conspiracy took place. The distribution has not even been addressed except in 
a key question when Zahorian was asked if he sent steroids to McMahon on October 24, 1989 (one of the 
two steroid shipments in question) and Zahorian answered that he was not certain. The prosecution had 
records of a bank check on 10/28 for $538 to Zahorian. Even if Emily Feinberg testifies she ordered 
steroids from Zahorian for McMahon to distribute to Hogan, it may be difficult for Feinberg to say for 
certain there actually were steroids in the package even though she believes it to be so, and even though a 
package may have been delivered to Hogan who believed it was steroids, with Zahorian not being certain. 
It makes the case for that particular charge of distribution weaker. In addition, on the two distribution 
counts, the key is whether the jury will buy the sharing steroids with a friend defense, or if they'll consider 
a few hundred dollars worth of drugs to be insignificant and somehow not worthy of putting someone in jail 
over, which, quite frankly, if that's all there is without proof there is more in the big picture, that's a 
reasonable conclusion to come to. The government has to be able to prove that the few hundred dollars 
worth of steroids was indicative of a larger, more major problem. Thus far it has proven there was a major 
problem with steroids rampant among wrestlers, but hasn't tied the company well enough into being 
responsible legally for that problem. 

*It appears the defense is building its case for defending the point that so many key personnel at Titan 
(and quite frankly, everyone close to the wrestling industry) were aware that Zahorian was supplying 
steroids to WWF wrestlers and was considered "the" supplier (although many individuals had their own 
connections because Zahorian's prices were routinely much higher than black market with the excuse being 
with Zahorian, you were guaranteed you were getting what was being advertised which is never the case 
on the black market) by the fact that Zahorian, an award-winning doctor, told Vince that by keeping the 
guys away from the black market since they were going to use steroids anyway, that he was protecting 
their health because there are more dangers from injecting unknown quantities into ones systems than 
from steroids and since McMahon, a layperson, heard this from a doctor, he unknowingly believed it to be 
so. Of course this is flawed logic because any cocaine dealer could argue that by selling uncontaminated 
cocaine, he was keeping his customers, who are going to get high whether he's there or not, from buying 
more dangerous drugs like impure cocaine, heroin or crack which are more addictive and could be worse 
for their health. In addition, the idea that the potential dangers of steroids were unknown to the average 
intelligent user of steroids (which is not a complete oxymoron) by the mid-80s has been used as a defense 


in the media, but in reality it is pure b.s. as any experienced lifter who spent anytime in a gym or power 
sports environment could give countless examples of people who have had side effects from steroids and 
the fact the medical community has warned against their use is has been known and ignored in gyms going 
back to the late 60s. 
sports environment could give countless examples of people who have had side effects from steroids and 
the fact the medical community has warned against their use is has been known and ignored in gyms going 
back to the late 60s. 

Zahorian was the only witness on Thursday. On Friday, Zahorian once again took up almost the entire day 
except for a far-too-long segment with a federal express employee who stated the obvious, that packages 
are rounded up to the next pound (in other words, a package weighing 2.1 pounds would have shown up 
in the documentation as a three pound package), that any employee of the company could use its Fed-ex 
number (thus packages to Titan Sports weren't necessarily for McMahon even if they used his fed-ex 
number to pay for them) and that even though it can be proven Zahorian made numerous shipments to 
Titan and even to McMahon, signed for by Feinberg, etc., that just from the fed-ex receipts and nothing 
else, nothing can be proven that there necessarily were steroids in the packages although I suspect all 
concerned will admit to the point that Zahorian did send steroids to McMahon, and that at some point at 
least some of those steroids wound up in the bloodstream of Terry Bollea. 

*The schedule was that on Monday, 7/11, Jim "Ultimate Warrior" Hellwig, Patterson, Doug Sages (Titan 
Sports Chief Financial Officer), Rood and Kevin "Nailz" Wacholz were scheduled to testify. Of the names 
mentioned last week as witnesses, John "Studd" Minton and Roy Wayne "Honkytonk Man" Farris are 
questionable as whether or not they'll appear, but Farris is another who sent Titan a request for 
employment recently, as it appeared did other government witnesses in the trial. Funny world we live in, 
but so as to not avoid any confusion, in all cases that I'm aware of, it was the wrestler initiating the contact 
so this isn't implying any funny business from Titan's side. There was a lot of talk that Hogan's testimony 
would come on Tuesday and no word on when Feinberg, considered the key to the government's case, 
would testify. 

In Zahorian's testimony, a great deal of time was spent by the defense attempting to show that Zahorian 
received improved treatment in prison in exchange for giving the government the information they wanted 
to receive. Zahorian testified that no promises were made, and in fact his requests to transfer to a work 
stockyard have been continually denied as have been his attempts to be released early. Apparently since 
Zahorian is considered a high-profile prisoner because of all the publicity stemming from his original case, 
the government doesn't want to release him early because it would come out publicly and make them 
appear to be weak on crime. Titan's attorneys, Jerry McDevitt and Laura Brevetti did show that Zahorian 
did get somewhat improved conditions in jail after testifying before the Grand Jury twice in April. They also 
made attempt after attempt to get Zahorian to slip up and say he had been led what to say or that 
prosecutors broke standard procedure, which ultimately went nowhere since they couldn't get him to crack. 
They also tried to imply that an $80,000 profit on the sale of his office/condo complex that the government 
seized in the 1991 trial, of which half the profits went to his wife since she owned half the property, 
constituted a payoff for giving them the info they wanted, which was a ludicrous argument since the wife 
owned half the complex and she committed no crime nor, according to testimony, was even aware of her 
husband's "side business" as he tried to keep it from her. 

Zahorian admitted to being a fan of pro wrestling as a teenager and in the days when WWF taped every 
third week at the Allentown Agricultural Hall in the early 80s, he was the ringside physician. Zahorian said 
he distributed steroids, valium, Tylenol III & IV and Halcions to wrestlers at shows starting in 1981 or 1982 
through 1989 although numerous wrestlers insist it dated back farther than that. At first, the only steroid he 
distributed was decadurabolin, but he expanded to other steroids. He said his steroid business picked up 
from 1985-87 because more wrestlers started taking steroids at that time. He said his business decreased 
and dropped largely in 1989 when the word got out that he was being investigated. Zahorian testified that 
98 to 99 percent of his steroid business was distribution to wrestlers and officers of the WWF. In cross-
examination by McDevitt, it was brought up Zahorian distributed to many wrestlers who had worked for the 
WWF after they had left, such as David Shults, Eddie Gilbert, Steve Muslin (Steve Travis) and Brian Blair, by 
which McDevitt, who had established a relevant point about the percentage, then tried to overstate it by 
using it to paint Zahorian as a liar and with a credibility problem with the 98 to 99 percent figure when it 
was clearly an understandable mistake, another overdramatization that appeared in some eyes to backfire. 
Zahorian then lowered it to 80 to 90 percent not including the former WWF wrestlers, with the other eight 
to 18 or percent being the wrestlers who had left the WWF that he had originally considered as WWF 


wrestlers and the remaining one or two percent were to Bill Dunn, the college strength coach who testified 
at his trial, Kevin Sheehan, allegedly a police officer friend of Shults' and Brian Sochia, an NFL football 
player with the Dolphins and Oilers who had a connection with Dunn. 
at his trial, Kevin Sheehan, allegedly a police officer friend of Shults' and Brian Sochia, an NFL football 
player with the Dolphins and Oilers who had a connection with Dunn. 

Zahorian said he would set up shop in Allentown in an artificial locker room and wrestlers would come in, 
and he'd give them steroids in brown paper bags. He'd give the wrestlers whatever drugs they wanted. 
Commission officials were often there as he was distributing steroids but WWF officials were not in the 
room as he was doing so. The situation was similar in Hershey. When asked if he was acting properly as a 
physician by doing this, Zahorian responded, "No I was not." Zahorian only followed up on the health of the 
wrestlers after using the drugs if the same wrestler appeared on the next show and brought it up. When 
asked if it was medically proper to give steroids to wrestlers for bodybuilding purposes, Zahorian 
responded, "It is against my ethical standards and I was wrong." When asked if it was proper for the 
patients to decide what drug they received, he said that it wasn't. 

Zahorian remembered distributing steroids to Skaaland around 1983-84 for his son George, then a jobber. 
Later McDevitt tried to make the point that George, as a jobber, wasn't a ticket seller, implying the 
government's case that Titan conspired to get the wrestlers on steroids to sell tickets somehow weakened 
because a wrestler who wasn't a ticket seller was being sold steroids. He'd give steroids to Arnold for 
George if George wasn't present. He also said he gave steroids to Strongbow on multiple occasions after 
1985 for his son. He said that in 1985, when Patterson was an agent, before he became McMahon's Vice 
President in charge of talent, that Patterson asked him if he was giving cocaine or heroin to the wrestlers 
and he said he was only giving them steroids and Tylenol III & IV. He said in Hershey, PA in early 1988 
(McDevitt attempted to make a big deal out of a contradiction because in Grand Jury testimony his dates 
were contradictory, but Zahorian said after thinking about it he believed it was early 1988), he was 
summoned by Patterson who said that Vince wanted to see him. McMahon allegedly asked him if he was 
giving wrestlers steroids and Zahorian said yes, that he was giving them steroids and other drugs. Zahorian 
said he told McMahon that if they weren't buying the steroids from him that they would be buying them on 
the black market from people they didn't know and the drugs could be tainted. Zahorian told McMahon they 
could get sick from them but with him they knew they were getting the real thing. Zahorian said he told 
McMahon at that point that if he wanted him to stop, he would. Vince at that point allegedly told him not to 
stop. The defense has already tried to make the point that Zahorian, a doctor, told McMahon, without a 
medical background, that the situation the way it was was better for the health of his wrestlers. 

Zahorian said he had another conversation with McMahon three to five months later and had four or five 
conversations with Feinberg who told him to send steroids to the office. He said he had no doctor/patient 
relationship with McMahon. He said the first amount he sent to McMahon was for one cycle (in other words, 
not enough for distribution), consisting of 12 vials of decadurabolin, two or three bottles of testosterone and 
a few bottles of HCG (not a steroid but a drug used coming off steroid cycles to kick ones testicles, which 
often slow down production of male hormone while on steroids, back into gear). In other conversations, 
Feinberg would call him and ask for a certain amount of steroids and mention that it was either for Mr. 
McMahon or Mr. Bollea. At one point he sent a package with seven or eight cycles to the Titan office (which 
would be enough theoretically for distribution--generally a cycle lasts six to 12 weeks so if one doesn't cycle 
off, it could also be at the least a nearly one year supply for one hardcore steroid freak). In early 1989, the 
Pennsylvania state government disbanded commission regulation of wrestling so the commission no longer 
appointed Zahorian to shows. At that point he claimed Patterson called him and said he could still see the 
wrestlers and would like to see him at the events. He also got a call from Skaaland who wanted him there, 
with the point being made that these conversations took place after the November 1988 steroid law 
changed making a doctor distributing steroids for something other than the treatment of disease in humans 
a felony. Several months later he got another call from Patterson, which he said he returned, and was 
asked by Patterson to call him back from a pay phone. Patterson then told him when he called that an 
investigation is going on that concerned Titan Sports. Because of the investigation he said that Patterson 
said that Vince told him it was necessary to destroy all documentation on the wrestlers. He said the 
investigation was probably minor but to please be careful and said that after the investigation was 
completed they could meet again and continue their relationship. At that point Zahorian removed his 
records regarding Titan wrestlers using steroids from his office, but instead of destroying them, moved 
them to a storage area and later moved them to his attorneys office at the time the government made the 
raid on his office which is why when the raid came there were no medical records of the wrestlers. At the 


time the raid was made, Zahorian was in the process of mailing out packages to Roddy Piper (who at the 
time was between stints in the WWF and working in Hollywood) and Mike Rotunda (who was with WCW at 
the time). The package to Piper contained steroids and possibly anti-inflammatory drugs which why Piper 
was required to testify in the first trial. 
time was between stints in the WWF and working in Hollywood) and Mike Rotunda (who was with WCW at 
the time). The package to Piper contained steroids and possibly anti-inflammatory drugs which why Piper 
was required to testify in the first trial. 

McDevitt then started questioning Zahorian and asked if he had knowingly perjured himself in his testimony 
at his own trial and Zahorian replied, "To a certain extent, yes." When asked if he perjured himself in front 
of the Grand Jury (Zahorian was called to the grand jury investigation of Titan and McMahon on 4/8 and 
4/15), he said that at the first Grand Jury hearing since he had been in prison, he wasn't clear about 
everything and didn't know why he was there, but after a week of thinking about it, the events became 
clearer in his head, which explained the haziness the first session as compared with the second. The 
defense attempted to make a point his treatment in prison was better during that week in between 
hearings, and then brought up the $40,000 his wife made as her share of the government auction sale of 
his office/condo complex. McDevitt brought up that on March 4, 1993, Zahorian was granted immunity from 
being prosecuted on charges that he perjured himself at the first trial in exchange for his testimony. 
McDevitt brought up that Zahorian wrote a letter to O'Shea last month in a request for them to assist him 
in getting into a Philadelphia halfway house and be furloughed on weekends while in a prison work 
program during the week. O'Shea wrote a letter saying they believed Zahorian was truthful and cooperative 
but before this line of questioning got any farther, the Judge interrupted McDevitt and scolded him saying 
that all this information was immaterial and inappropriate. Zahorian said his total contact with Tony Valenti 
(the justice department investigator who was largely responsible for this case) was one 30 minute 
conversation eight to ten months ago and two or three phone calls since. Much of what McDevitt was doing 
appeared to be an attempt to get Zahorian to slip up, even trying to push Zahorian to somehow indicate he 
was told by Valenti what answers to give but Zahorian never slipped up, which seemed to frustrate 
McDevitt who seemed unprepared for courtroom battle and would almost freeze when answers didn't go 
the way he expected. Apparently where Zahorian perjured himself in the first trial was when he testified 
that he never started anyone out on steroids, that everyone he sold to had previously used them when he 
knowingly knew that wasn't the case. They tried to make a point that in the Grand Jury, Zahorian didn't 
know anything when the name Emily Feinberg was brought up, but did remember sending steroids 
requested by Bollea, said to be for Tiny Lister (Zeus), mailed to McMahon in Atlanta at the time "No Holds 
Barred" was being filmed. Zahorian recalled a call from Bollea saying that "Zeus" needed three or four 
bottles of testosterone and Bollea told him to send it to Vince in Atlanta. The defense seemed to be trying 
to make the point that in this case it was Bollea distributing to McMahon, but this point wasn't clear. 
Zahorian said that in his few other conversations with McMahon besides the one in Hershey, that they were 
brief and they never talked about steroids, and that he never met Feinberg but had talked to her on the 
phone. McDevitt continued to try to push the point that Zahorian was in horrible conditions in prison and 
claimed he was later given preferential treatment. 

Zahorian admitted that Titan Sports never paid him anything extra for selling steroids nor did he split profits 
with Titan on his steroid sales, nor was an offer ever made offering to split profits for letting him sell 
steroids to the wrestlers. When asked if there was a legitimate medical need for some of the drugs (not 
necessarily steroids) he dispensed, Zahorian responded, "Sometimes." McDevitt established that when 
Zahorian gave guys drugs in the brown paper bags and that sometimes there weren't any steroids in the 
bags but other drugs. When the guys came out of where he set up shop carrying around the bags, nobody 
could tell from the bags whether there were steroids or other drugs or a combination of both in their bags. 
McDevitt also brought up that nobody from the state athletic commission or the staff at the arenas he was 
dealing in ever reported or even questioned him about what he was doing, nor did any physician ever 
report his activities publicly as being wrong. Zahorian was asked that in 1977, when he first became 
affiliated with the WWWF, was anyone on steroids, and he said yes, and then when McDevitt brought up 
the names Ken Patera, Billy Graham and Ivan Putski, Zahorian said they were all on steroids. When 
McDevitt asked if dianabol was used predominately in those days (this line of questioning obviously coming 
from reading the Billy Graham interview in the Observer in January, 1992), Zahorian said No. McDevitt then 
brought up the labeling that the government put in every steroid package, which has largely been laughed 
at by athletes for years and even used as an illogical defense for using them by athletes because the illogic 
goes that since the government lied in labeling so therefore the claimed dangers and side effects must also 
be a lie. The actual label in every steroid bottle during that period stated "steroids do not enhance athletic 
performance." Zahorian said he wasn't aware of that labeling. When McDevitt showed him the labeling, 


Zahorian said, "The effect on wrestlers was inconsistent with the statement I'm reading." 

McDevitt said the government alleged the conspiracy began in 1985 and Zahorian said that date was being 
used because it was the earliest evidence used in his trial. Zahorian said that McMahon, Lanza, Skaaland 
and the other agents were never in the room when he was giving the wrestlers steroids and that Phil 
Zacko, Vince McMahon Sr. and Gorilla Monsoon (the three co-owners of Capital Sports aka WWF before 
McMahon Jr. took over, the predecessor to Titan Sports) never encouraged him to sell steroids to the 
wrestlers. When McDevitt asked if a specific federal express package was brought up to him, could he 
remember what was in it and Zahorian said, "It would be very difficult," which could be a strong point in 
favor of the defense when the distribution charges start being argued. When McDevitt said that no agents 
had ever called and asked him to bring steroids he said that Skaaland once called and asked him if he was 
coming to a show and bringing his medication with him. Zahorian said that nobody from Titan ever 
encouraged him to make the wrestlers bigger or larger than life and nobody ever told him to sell steroids to 
wrestlers to enhance ticket sales. When McDevitt brought up that during the trial he reported that the 
wrestlers were his patients, Zahorian responded that after two years of incarceration, he realizes the 
wrestlers were not his patients. Zahorian, when asked if he gave wrestlers directions on how to use 
steroids, said, "Sometimes yes and sometimes no." McDevitt brought up George Skaaland, making the point 
that he was a jobber and thus didn't sell any tickets, but was using steroids, and brought up Strongbow's 
son as well. Then he brought up Kevin Sheehan, the police officer friend of Shults' who he sold steroids to 
along with Dunn and Sochia and ex-WWF wrestlers like Shults and Blair trying to say Zahorian's 98 to 99 
percent figure was a lie, when Zahorian basically said that if you take away the ex-WWF wrestlers the 
figure was 80 percent, tried to make a major production as if it proved Zahorian was lying, but it seemed 
nobody was buying it. At one point while McDevitt was carrying on about a minor wording inconsistency 
and using the word perjury, Judge Mishler sternly told the jury that perjury only exists when someone 
knowingly lies, which reflected poorly on McDevitt. At another point McDevitt tried to berate Zahorian when 
he brought up the name Randy Poffo and Zahorian said he remembered him and described The Genius 
gimmick, which was of course Lanny Poffo, which apparently was used for a brief moment as an attempt to 
impugn Zahorian's brain when it also was an understandable mistake for someone who mainly knew the 
guys by their working names. McDevitt then asked if McMahon had anything to do with his selling steroids 
to Sheehan, Patera or Shults, which he obviously didn't. Zahorian testified that he never told his wife about 
his steroid sales and that he kept the money for himself. 

Zahorian testified he talked with Skaaland, Patterson and Feinberg after Pennsylvania deregulated wrestling 
about continuing to work at the shows. When asked about Anita Scales, who worked with Titan in relations 
with commissions and who is expected to testify to warning Titan early in the game about Zahorian, and 
her decision to drop Zahorian being overruled by Patterson and Linda McMahon siding with Patterson on the 
issue, Zahorian said he didn't recall who she was. After a few more questions, he did recall talking to a 
woman. The defense tried to make the point that Zahorian didn't go to McMahon about continuing to work 
at the shows which if there had been a conspiracy between the two, he would have gone right to the top 
and it would have been a done deal. Zahorian said that he wasn't aware of the steroid law changing on 
November 18, 1988 making a doctors distributing for non-medical purposes illegal, thus when asked if he 
told anyone in Titan Sports about the law change, obviously he couldn't have if he didn't know it himself. 

McDevitt then read off a bunch of names, trying to get Zahorian to say they didn't use steroids trying to 
make the point that you didn't need steroids to be a star in the WWF. When asked if he had sold steroids 
to the following, Zahorian's responded--Nikolai Volkoff--"I believe so"; Raymond Rougeau--"I'm not 
certain"; Butch Miller--"Possibly;" King Kong Bundy--"I don't believe so. He was extremely large and had 
diabetes." Sgt. Slaughter--"No;" George Steele--"No;" Bob Backlund--"No;" A few more names were 
mentioned with McDevitt pointing to Slaughter as being a popular wrestler who didn't use steroids to the 
jury, although that was something of a bogus point to the case since Slaughter was a superstar in the 
business with major name recognition before the steroid craze hit the business. He was also fired by the 
WWF (having nothing to do with his physique) prior to the beginning of the indictment in 1985 and didn't 
return until well after Zahorian had been told to stay away from the arenas. He did return and was 
headliner and champion during the early 1991 period while the steroid craze was still at its heights. Bundy 
had unusually freakish size, Steele was in his 50s and had a gimmick that didn't require a physique and the 
same name recognition and star status before the craze and Backlund was a champion for six years before 
the craze and also was long gone from the company during the period in question so whether he was a 


steroid guy or not isn't applicable to the trial. The other names mentioned in reality were just guys on the 
card as opposed to being big money draws. The prosecution never pointed this out so McDevitt may have 
swayed the jury with what was a point with little or no merit. Zahorian said he had never talked to the 
WWF agents about FDA regulations regarding steroids (which preceded the 1988 law and made dispensing 
without a prescription illegal) and said they did not work together to defraud the FDA. Zahorian admitted 
that even after his late 1989 phone conversation with Patterson that he continued to sell steroids to people 
like Dunn, Blair, Sheehan and Eddie Gilbert among others. When asked if the phone call from Patterson 
deterred him from selling steroids, he said, "Not to a large degree. I was concerned but continued to sell 
steroids." He also mentioned that Randy Savage purchased steroids from him. 
card as opposed to being big money draws. The prosecution never pointed this out so McDevitt may have 
swayed the jury with what was a point with little or no merit. Zahorian said he had never talked to the 
WWF agents about FDA regulations regarding steroids (which preceded the 1988 law and made dispensing 
without a prescription illegal) and said they did not work together to defraud the FDA. Zahorian admitted 
that even after his late 1989 phone conversation with Patterson that he continued to sell steroids to people 
like Dunn, Blair, Sheehan and Eddie Gilbert among others. When asked if the phone call from Patterson 
deterred him from selling steroids, he said, "Not to a large degree. I was concerned but continued to sell 
steroids." He also mentioned that Randy Savage purchased steroids from him. 

*********************************************************** 

While officials from WCW were celebrating after the live WCW Saturday Night show on 7/9, it ended a week 
filled with finger pointing and the celebration ignored all available numbers indicating how the Hogan 
signing has worked. 

The group was put into a panic when just two weeks before the most important and most expensive show 
in its history, Bash at the Beach, the Saturday show on 7/2 did a 1.8 rating and the Sunday show did a 
horrible 1.4. In addition, an attempt to track PPV buys as of nine days before the show indicated the 
number of advance buys was virtually identical to its previous shows, despite the hoped-for match of the 
century bonanza on top, Hogan's presence and the major celebrity involvement. Since most PPV buys are 
done in the last three days, that isn't necessarily an indication of a disaster, as one week out the first 
Wrestlemania looked to be one of wrestling's biggest disasters but turned into its biggest success in history 
up to that point, but by no means can any of this be taken as good news. WCW officials were still hoping 
for and predicting a 1.0, which would be a definite success and believing there is a probability of a full 
house (the 16,000-seat Orlando Arena is being heavily papered but our reports are as of one week ahead 
of time there are only about 6,000 seats left) which would be the company's largest live gate since the Ric 
Flair-Terry Funk match at the 1989 Baltimore Bash. However, no matter what the live gate, if the show 
does a .55 or .60, given the expenses and Hogan's price tag, that would be a total disaster since it would 
mean the company is on the road to a six month period where it will spend an additional $2 million and 
derive little return on that investment, because if Hogan doesn't draw well the first time out, it isn't going 
to get better as time goes on. Even a .9 on the first show would still mean Hogan and Flair would have to 
retain the entire audience for two more PPV shows, probably without as much celebrity help since Hogan 
called in all his markers for this show, for the Hogan deal to be successful over the short-run. If it does 
well, Hogan is expected to have more power in bringing people in. Considering the weak TV numbers going 
in (which are not always but usually are a strong barometer of a PPV buy rate), there is more chance of the 
beginnings of the much-predicted multi-million dollar disaster than of success at this point. 

Before the Saturday show, the week was filled with blame for one person or another for the bad numbers. 
While they've done a great job of creating the illusion that Hogan's popularity has never been stronger, 
thus far it only appears to be an illusion. Illusions spread long enough and well enough often turn into 
reality in this business. While this is not a valid reason for if the match draws or not, they have diluted the 
Flair-Hogan issue badly with too much emphasis on Jimmy Hart and Sherri Martel. Many have also blamed 
the snafu on Main Event giving away the Clash results a few weeks back for ruining interest (a view that I 
don't buy for a second). 

WCW did a high-energy live show on 7/9, but the show was rushed and the needed killer live angle with 
Flair and Hogan didn't appear to be killer enough. They spent the entire show pushing the 900 line telling 
people to call and vote for two wrestlers that would appear in the main event. Reportedly there were about 
6,000 calls grossing $12,000 (about half of which goes to the phone company), which the company was 
thrilled out of its mind with although I'd consider those numbers disappointing with the constant hard-sell 
throughout the show since Jim Ross used to gross that much revenue when he did the hotline on an 
average Saturday. Latest word is that the company wants to do this gimmick regularly on television now 
where fans pick participants. If 45 minutes of television promotion time is only worth a few thousand 
dollars, somebody needs an economics lesson. Everyone knew in advance they were running Flair-Sting on 
top of course, and the show largely led the audience to pick Flair and Sting so in reality it was a scam, but 
supposedly the numbers represented on the screen picking Flair and Sting were legit. The free live show for 


Hogan's first appearance at Center Stage not only drew a full house of 785 but turned away about 2,000. 
Our reports are that it was seeing Hogan for free and not the fact the show was airing live that was largely 
responsible for the crowd. Of those in the building, as many as half were a combination of families of 
employees, plants and paid models to make sure the audience "looked good" and "reacted right," since the 
building was said to be half-full before fans were allowed in. This may explain part of the strong face 
reaction for Hogan and particularly the surprising reaction to Mr. T. Those who arrived even two hours early 
were turned away because the lines were so long and so few seats were available to fans. They taped two 
more Saturday shows after the live taping ended, although at press time we don't have news on those 
shows. They only left about 7:00 of air time for the Flair-Sting match, post-match angle and interviews with 
Flair & Sherri and Hogan & Mr. T to close the show. While Flair took one bump after another for the brief 
time he gave himself in the ring, the thing was way too rushed and Sting once again came out of the show 
as the odd man out. Sting put the scorpion on at 4:20 when Sherri Martel, dressed up like Charlie Chaplin 
in a suit, ran in and manhandled a male ref throwing him out of the ring and face-raked and incapacitated 
Sting. Earlier in the show, Sherri, barred from the arena, tried to "sneak in" dressed as Fifi in a funny and 
creative skit (which didn't air live, and in actuality took five re-takes to get it right) though only a blind-man 
couldn't see the "man" interfering was Sherri. Hogan ran in and atomic dropped Sherri, which she barely 
sold (a Hogan atomic drop should have at least knocked a woman down for a lengthy period of time) and 
the whole idea of this is questionable at this point in time anyway. He then pulled off her wig revealing who 
she was. Flair clipped Hogan's knee and got a few seconds of advantage before Mr. T (who got a 
surprisingly big pop) and Jimmy Hart made the save. Although I'm sure Mr. T is a tough guy and has that 
great scowling face to people believe it, it does nothing for your product when your world champion and 
top heel one week before the match of the century runs away from a 160-pound manager and a has-been 
actor. I guess T must have threatened him by forcing him to watch old "A Team" episodes and that would 
scare anyone. Earlier in the live show, Dustin Rhodes & Arn Anderson beat Steve "George Washington" 
Keirn & Bobby Eaton in 3:22 when Rhodes pinned Eaton with a bulldog in a typical squash with good action 
but too short to mean anything, Rick Steamboat pinned Tex Slazenger in 1:46 and a match with Marcus 
Bagwell & The Patriot vs. Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff went a scant 1:59 before the Sullivan Brothers came 
out, distracting Roma who was pinned from behind by Bagwell. This appears to be setting up Bagwell & 
Patriot as title contenders if/when Roma & Orndorff take the straps. The show also featured a Hogan 
interview, bringing up the celebs (Shaquille O'Neal, George Foreman, Mr. T and Hank Aaron; so the 
attempts for Mike Tyson, Sly Stallone and Wesley Snipes fell by the wayside but it is still by far the most 
impressive celeb list at a wrestling show in several years) that will be in Orlando. Hogan live more than 
made up for his poor interview the week before when he focused more on Jimmy Hart and Sherri than on a 
so-called match of the century being two weeks away. On television Hogan appeared to be loudly cheered, 
although from live reports there were noticeable boos and "We Want Flair" chants during his first interview. 
Probably 80% of the phone calls here after the show were negative, while our reports from the company 
were that they were thrilled. That may do more to explain the status of the company than anything else. 
Hogan has appearances this week of Regis & Kathy Lee on 7/11 and Jay Leno on 7/12, and the trial, in a 
busy week leading to the match. WCW's more than double the usual ad budget was reflected in buying 
spots in syndication for Bash at the Beach on many WWF Superstars shows, which must have thrilled those 
in Titan. 
Our reports are that it was seeing Hogan for free and not the fact the show was airing live that was largely 
responsible for the crowd. Of those in the building, as many as half were a combination of families of 
employees, plants and paid models to make sure the audience "looked good" and "reacted right," since the 
building was said to be half-full before fans were allowed in. This may explain part of the strong face 
reaction for Hogan and particularly the surprising reaction to Mr. T. Those who arrived even two hours early 
were turned away because the lines were so long and so few seats were available to fans. They taped two 
more Saturday shows after the live taping ended, although at press time we don't have news on those 
shows. They only left about 7:00 of air time for the Flair-Sting match, post-match angle and interviews with 
Flair & Sherri and Hogan & Mr. T to close the show. While Flair took one bump after another for the brief 
time he gave himself in the ring, the thing was way too rushed and Sting once again came out of the show 
as the odd man out. Sting put the scorpion on at 4:20 when Sherri Martel, dressed up like Charlie Chaplin 
in a suit, ran in and manhandled a male ref throwing him out of the ring and face-raked and incapacitated 
Sting. Earlier in the show, Sherri, barred from the arena, tried to "sneak in" dressed as Fifi in a funny and 
creative skit (which didn't air live, and in actuality took five re-takes to get it right) though only a blind-man 
couldn't see the "man" interfering was Sherri. Hogan ran in and atomic dropped Sherri, which she barely 
sold (a Hogan atomic drop should have at least knocked a woman down for a lengthy period of time) and 
the whole idea of this is questionable at this point in time anyway. He then pulled off her wig revealing who 
she was. Flair clipped Hogan's knee and got a few seconds of advantage before Mr. T (who got a 
surprisingly big pop) and Jimmy Hart made the save. Although I'm sure Mr. T is a tough guy and has that 
great scowling face to people believe it, it does nothing for your product when your world champion and 
top heel one week before the match of the century runs away from a 160-pound manager and a has-been 
actor. I guess T must have threatened him by forcing him to watch old "A Team" episodes and that would 
scare anyone. Earlier in the live show, Dustin Rhodes & Arn Anderson beat Steve "George Washington" 
Keirn & Bobby Eaton in 3:22 when Rhodes pinned Eaton with a bulldog in a typical squash with good action 
but too short to mean anything, Rick Steamboat pinned Tex Slazenger in 1:46 and a match with Marcus 
Bagwell & The Patriot vs. Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff went a scant 1:59 before the Sullivan Brothers came 
out, distracting Roma who was pinned from behind by Bagwell. This appears to be setting up Bagwell & 
Patriot as title contenders if/when Roma & Orndorff take the straps. The show also featured a Hogan 
interview, bringing up the celebs (Shaquille O'Neal, George Foreman, Mr. T and Hank Aaron; so the 
attempts for Mike Tyson, Sly Stallone and Wesley Snipes fell by the wayside but it is still by far the most 
impressive celeb list at a wrestling show in several years) that will be in Orlando. Hogan live more than 
made up for his poor interview the week before when he focused more on Jimmy Hart and Sherri than on a 
so-called match of the century being two weeks away. On television Hogan appeared to be loudly cheered, 
although from live reports there were noticeable boos and "We Want Flair" chants during his first interview. 
Probably 80% of the phone calls here after the show were negative, while our reports from the company 
were that they were thrilled. That may do more to explain the status of the company than anything else. 
Hogan has appearances this week of Regis & Kathy Lee on 7/11 and Jay Leno on 7/12, and the trial, in a 
busy week leading to the match. WCW's more than double the usual ad budget was reflected in buying 
spots in syndication for Bash at the Beach on many WWF Superstars shows, which must have thrilled those 
in Titan. 

*********************************************************** 

This is the first of the 12-page Observers. In future issues we should have a lot more news content but it's 
just as well as we haven't had the needed space for letters and want ads so this issue will start to catch 
things up. After a long talk with post office officials this past week about delivery problems in certain parts 
of the United States, I've been told that the problem is that on the back page we had copy going too far 
down the page with the label and the sorting machines were reading the return address or numbers on that 
half of the back page and misdirecting issues. The idea has always been to get as much material into each 
weekly issue as possible, so we've crammed as much copy onto the back page as possible each week but I 
guess while the idea of it was good, the results weren't. Why the delays seemed to be more prevalent in 
New York and Kentucky than other states is beyond me, but we will try it their way. After a few weeks, if 
those of you in those states that have had delivery problems don't see things improving (which should 
mean delivery consistently by Mondays and usually on Saturdays in most of the country), please contact me 
and we'll try another method. 


As the first issue of the new set, this means if you've got a (1) on your address that your current Observer 
subscription will expire in three weeks. Renewal rates within the United States, Canada and Mexico remain 
$8 for four issues, $15 for eight, $22 for 12, $28 for 16, $42 for 24, $56 for 32 and $70 for 40 issues. 
Rates for the rest of the world for weekly airmail delivery start at $11 for four, $21 for eight, $30 for 12, 
$50 for 20, $70 for 28, $90 for 36 up through $100 for 40. All subscription renewals along with reports 
from live shows, letters to the editor, news items and any other correspondence related to this publication 
should be sent to the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228. 
subscription will expire in three weeks. Renewal rates within the United States, Canada and Mexico remain 
$8 for four issues, $15 for eight, $22 for 12, $28 for 16, $42 for 24, $56 for 32 and $70 for 40 issues. 
Rates for the rest of the world for weekly airmail delivery start at $11 for four, $21 for eight, $30 for 12, 
$50 for 20, $70 for 28, $90 for 36 up through $100 for 40. All subscription renewals along with reports 
from live shows, letters to the editor, news items and any other correspondence related to this publication 
should be sent to the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228. 

Fax messages can be sent to the Observer after Noon Eastern time (9 a.m. Pacific) on a daily basis at 408378-
6562. Phone messages can be left 24 hours a day at 408-379-8067. For the most up to date headlines 
on wrestling, I can be called on the Real Wrestling Hotline at 900-903-9030 (99 cents per minute) every 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 

RESULTS 

6/21 Savannah, GA (WCW -1,500): Arn Anderson d Brian Pillman, Bullrope match: Dustin Rhodes b 
Bunkhouse Buck, Cactus Jack & Kevin Sullivan b Nasty Boys-DQ, U.S. title: Sting b Steve Austin-DQ, WCW 
title: Ric Flair b Rick Steamboat **** 

6/21 Cuernavaca (EMLL): Onita Jr. (Akihito Ichihara) & Mestizo b Rey Bucanero & Babe Richard, Los 
Hijos de Huracan Ramirez I & II b Archangel de la Muerte & Guerrero de la Muerte, La Fiera & Hayabusa & 
Ultimo Dragon b Angel Blanco Jr. & Los Hijos de Angel Blanco I & II, CMLL welterweight title: Pantera II b 
Felino to win title 

6/23 Mexico City Pista Arena Revolucion (EMLL): Turako b Durango Kid, Los Hijos de Angel Blanco I 
& II b Celestial & Solar II, Hector Garza & Bronco & Valiente b Javier Cruz & Tornado Negro & Kraneo, 
Emilio Charles Jr. & Pierroth Jr. & Angel Blanco Jr. b Los Brazos 

6/24 Arena Mexico in Mexico City (EMLL): Legendario & Ultimatum b Supremo II (Mary Welles) & Rey 
Bucanero, Javier Cruz & Espectro Jr. & Cadaver de Ultratumba b Hayabusa & Americo Rocca & Chicago 
Express, Black Magic & Negro Casas & Mano Negra b Los Brazos, Atlantis & Ultimo Dragon & Rayo de 
Jalisco Jr. b Bestia Salvaje & Mocho Cota & Dr. Wagner Jr., Vampiro Canadiense b Samson Fuyuki 

6/25 Apatlaco (UWA): Chola & La Indomable b Lady Star & Miguli, Casandro & Adrian El Exotico & Sexi 
Pisces b Ruben Juarez Jr. & Seminarista & Gamma, El Engendro & Scorpio Jr. & Shu El Guerrero b Karloff 
Lagarde Jr. & Principe Maya & Perro Silva-DQ, UWA trios title: El Signo & Negro Navarro & Rocky Santana b 
Los Villanos III & IV & V, Canek b The Killer-DQ 

6/26 El Toreo in Naucalpan (UWA/AAA Double Power -6,500): Mercenario & Black Jack & Spartaco 
b Falcon & Apolo & Kick Boxer, Solar & Winners & El Mexicano b Negro Navarro & El Signo & Rocky 
Santana, Los Villanos III & IV & V DDQ Rambo & Jerry Estrada & Fishman, Dos Caras & Transformer & 
Gran Hamada b El Satanico & Blue Panther & Solar-DQ, UWA hwt title: Canek b Mascara Ano 2000 

7/1 Portland, OR (Oregon Pro Wrestling Federation -175): John Rambo b The Bodyguard, Little 
Nasty Boy d Little Savage, Kat d Sabrina, Ole Olson b Sumito, Mike Miller & Lou Andrews & Ole Olson b 
Buddy Rose & Moondog Moretti & Buddy Wayne 

7/1 Kings Mountain, NC (Southern Championship Wrestling -57): Emilio Ulacia b Kevin Kirby, 
Flaming Youth b John Sullivan-DQ, Bad Dog (David Lynch) b Executioner (Mark Henderson), Scotty 
Hotbody & Scotty McKeever b Jay Eagle & Johnny Red Cloud, American G.I. & Dozer (Richie & J.R. 
Scruggs) b Jeff Viktory & Rick Starr-DQ 

7/4 Osaka (All Japan -2,050 sellout): Masao Inoue b Kentaro Shiga, Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Tom Zenk, 
Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Ryukaku Izumida & Yoshinari Ogawa, Mighty Inoue & Haruka 
Eigen & Masa Fuchi b Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota, The Eagle & Johnny Ace b Kurt Beyer 
& Richard Slinger, Jun Akiyama b Johnny Smith, Stan Hansen & Takao Omori b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, 
Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Tamon Honda b Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Satoru Asako 23:29 


7/4 Aomori (New Japan -3,260 sellout): Tokimitsu Ishizawa b Yuji Nagata, Hiro Saito b Michiyoshi 
Ohara, Kengo Kimura b Norio Honaga, Super Strong Machine b Akitoshi Saito, Jushin Liger & El Samurai & 
Shinjiro Ohtani b Max Moon & American Love Machine & Black Tiger, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b 
Power Warrior & Tadao Yasuda, Shinya Hashimoto & Hiroshi Hase b Steve Regal & Too Cold Scorpio, Keiji 
Muto & Masa Chono b Nasty Boys, Osamu Kido & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami b Tatsutoshi Goto & 
Shiro Koshinaka & Great Kabuki 
Ohara, Kengo Kimura b Norio Honaga, Super Strong Machine b Akitoshi Saito, Jushin Liger & El Samurai & 
Shinjiro Ohtani b Max Moon & American Love Machine & Black Tiger, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b 
Power Warrior & Tadao Yasuda, Shinya Hashimoto & Hiroshi Hase b Steve Regal & Too Cold Scorpio, Keiji 
Muto & Masa Chono b Nasty Boys, Osamu Kido & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami b Tatsutoshi Goto & 
Shiro Koshinaka & Great Kabuki 

7/5 Hachinohe (New Japan -3,350): Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga b Tokimitsu Ishizawa & Yuji Nagata, 
Akitoshi Saito b Takayuki Iizuka, Black Cat & American Love Machine & Black Tiger b Jushin Liger & El 
Samurai & Shinjiro Ohtani, Power Warrior & Osamu Kido b Max Moon & Steve Regal, Hiroshi Hase & Tadao 
Yasuda & Shinya Hashimoto b Nasty Boys & Too Cold Scorpio, Tatsumi Fujinami b Michiyoshi Ohara, Riki 
Choshu b Kengo Kimura, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka b Akira Nogami & Keiji Muto 
& Masa Chono 

7/5 Warrensville, NC (SMW TV taping -500): Scott Studd b Bruiser Bedlam-DQ, Scott & Steve 
Armstrong b Steve Skyfire & Chris Hamrick, Rock & Roll Express b Infernos (Brian Logan & Anthony 
Michaels), Tracy Smothers b Brian Lee, SMW TV title: Chris Candido b Studd to win vacant title, New Jack & 
Sheik Mustapha b Michaels & Hamrick, Thrillseekers b Logan & Skyfire, Dirty White Boy b Logan, 
Thrillseekers b Michaels & Hamrick, Jack & Mustapha b Studd & Skyfire, SMW tag title: Lee & Candido b 
Armstrongs-DQ, Dock fight: Smothers b Bedlam, Rock & Roll & Bambi b Lee & Candido & Tammy Fytch 

7/6 Amagaseki (Pancrase -4,910 sellout): Renco Parduel b Vernon White, Manabu Yamada b Utra, 
Wayne Shamrock b Matt Hume, Yusuke Fuke b Gregory Smitt, Bas Ruton b Minoru Suzuki, Jason DeLucca b 
Masakatsu Funaki 

7/6 Towada (New Japan -2,120): Tadao Yasuda & Shinjiro Ohtani & Tokimitsu Ishizawa b Tatsuhito 
Takaiwa & Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi, Tatsutoshi Goto b Norio Honaga, Kengo Kimura b Hiro Saito, 
Black Tiger & Too Cold Scorpio & Max Moon b Jushin Liger & El Samurai & Akira Nogami, Riki Choshu b 
Akitoshi Saito, Steve Regal & Nasty Boys b Takayuki Iizuka & Keiji Muto & Masa Chono, Tatsumi Fujinami & 
Power Warrior b American Love Machine & Black Cat, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka 
b Osamu Kido & Hiroshi Hase & Shinya Hashimoto 

7/6 Tokushima (All Japan -1,800): Masao Inoue b Ryukaku Izumida, Yoshinari Ogawa b Richard 
Slinger, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Kurt Beyer & The Eagle, Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota 
b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen, Masa Fuchi b Satoru Asako, Kenta Kobashi b Takao Omori, Giant Baba & 
Stan Hansen b Johnny Ace & Johnny Smith, All-Asian tag titles: Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Jun Akiyama 
& Tsuyoshi Kikuchi, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue b Mitsuharu Misawa & Tamon Honda 

7/6 Aguascalientes (AAA): Prelim results unavailable, Jerrito Estrada & Espectrito & Fuercita Guerrera b 
Micro Konnan & Mascarita Sagrada & Octagoncito, Tony Arce & Vulcano & Rocco Valente b Rey Misterio Jr. 
& Volador & Lizmark, Perro Aguayo & Octagon & Tinieblas Jr. b Pirata Morgan & El Satanico & Espectro-DQ 

7/6 Tampa (Ind -275): Merc the Cruiser b The Menace, Billy Mack b Haystacks Calhoun Jr., Jeff James 
d Randy Fuller, Nuclear Assassin b G-Man-DQ, Motor City Bad Boys DDQ Mohammad Studd & Jeff Bradley, 
Horace Boulder b Hercules-DQ 

7/7 Landover, MD (WWF -1,800): 1-2-3 Kid b Kwang ***1/4, Duke Droese b Rick Martel DUD, WWF 
tag title: Head Shrinkers b Double Trouble DUD, Randy Savage b Jerry Lawler DUD, Nikolai Volkoff b Virgil 
DUD, IRS b Tatanka-DQ 1/2*, Yokozuna b Typhoon -*****, WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart **1/2 

7/7 Valley Forge, PA (WWF -200): Jim Powers b Damien Demento, Mighty Doom b Little Leopard, Sgt. 
Slaughter b Pierre, Mike Sharpe b Glenn Osbourne, Heidi Lee Morgan b Rustee Thomas, Bob Backlund b 
Greg Valentine 

7/7 Marukame (All Japan -1,800): Masao Inoue b Kurt Beyer, Richard Slinger & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b 
Kentaro Shiga & Yoshinari Ogawa, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Tamon Honda & Takao Omori, 
Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota d Haruka Eigen & Mighty Inoue & Masa Fuchi 30:00, Dan 


Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Jun Akiyama & Satoru Asako, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi b The Eagle 
(Jackie Fulton) & Johnny Ace, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue b Stan Hansen & Johnny Smith (Jackie Fulton) & Johnny Ace, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue b Stan Hansen & Johnny Smith 

7/7 Harlan, KY (SMW -250): Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai (Brian Logan), Penalty box match: 
Thrillseekers b Well Dunn, SMW tag title: Brian Lee & Chris Candido b Steve & Scott Armstrong, Dock fight: 
Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam 

7/7 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (Social Pro Wrestling Federation): Kamikaze b Fukumentaro, Isao Takagi 
& Hirofumi Miura b Hiroshi Shimada & Yoshiaki Yatsu, Masayoshi Motegi b Shinichi Nakano, Yatsu b Takagi 

7/7 Maryville, TN (All State Wrestling): Shogun b Lone Star, Chic White b Bam Bam Christian, 
Regulator Stone & Steel DDQ Deke & Jody Ray Rivers, Rick Connors & Lone Star b Bobby B & Dennis Coats, 
Rick Cannon b Tony Prichard 

7/8 Meadowlands in East Rutherford, NJ (WWF -4,000): 1-2-3 Kid b Kwang **, Duke Droese b 
Rick Martel DUD, WWF tag title: Head Shrinkers b Double Trouble *, Randy Savage b Jerry Lawler **, 
Nikolai Volkoff b Virgil 1/2*, IRS b Tatanka-DQ **, Yokozuna b Typhoon DUD, 60:00 marathon match: Bret 
Hart b Owen Hart 3-2 **1/2 

7/8 Sapporo (New Japan -6,000 sellout): Tokimitsu Ishizawa & Yuji Nagata b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & 
Tadao Yasuda, Black Cat & American Love Machine & Black Tiger (Eddy Guerrero) b El Samurai & Too Cold 
Scorpio & Shinjiro Ohtani, Nasty Boys b Max Moon (Tom Boric aka Paul Diamond aka Haito aka Kato) & 
Steve Regal, G1 climax tournament elimination: Hiro Saito b Akira Nogami, Takayuki Iizuka b Great Kabuki-
DQ, Osamu Kido b Michiyoshi Ohara, Yoshiaki Yatsu b Kengo Kimura, Non-tournament main events: Jushin 
Liger b Great Sasuke, Rick & Scott Steiner b Hiroshi Hase & Keiji Muto 20:55, Shinya Hashimoto & Masa 
Chono & Power Warrior b Yoshiaki Fujiwara & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami 

7/8 Kochi (All Japan -2,200 sellout): Mighty Inoue b Masao Inoue, Tamon Honda b Kurt Beyer, Jun 
Akiyama & Satoru Asako b Richard Slinger & Johnny Smith, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota 
b Ryukaku Izumida & Masa Fuchi & Haruka Eigen, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Dan Kroffat & 
Doug Furnas, Stan Hansen & Takao Omori b The Eagle & Johnny Ace, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & 
Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa 

7/8 Beckley, WV (SMW -350): Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai, Penalty box match: Thrillseekers 
b Well Dunn, SMW tag title: Scott & Steve Armstrong b Brian Lee & Chris Candido-DQ, Dock fight: Tracy 
Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam 

7/8 Montgomeryville, PA (ECW -175): Rockin Rebel b Steve Richards, Handicap match: Tazmaniac b 
Dino Sanna & Joel Hartgood, ECW tag title: Public Enemy b Mikey Whippreck & Jim Lano, Sabu b Mr. 
Hughes ***1/2, ECW title: Shane Douglas b Tommy Dreamer **1/4 

7/8 Tijuana, Baja California (AAA -5,500 sellout): Rey Misterio Jr. & Torero & Latin Lover b Tony 
Arce & Vulcano & Psicosis ***1/2, Cien Caras & Mascara Ano 2000 & Universo 2000 b Los Payasos **3/4, 
Rey Misterio b Jerry Estrada-DQ ****1/4, Pirata Morgan & El Satanico & Espectro b Konnan El Barbaro & 
Perro Aguayo & Mascara Sagrada-DQ *3/4 

7/8 Arena Mexico in Mexico City (EMLL): Prelim results unavailable, Americo Rocca & Pantera II & 
Apolo Dantes b Felino & Cachorro Mendoza & Javier Cruz, One night trios tourney: Silver King & El Texano 
& Dandy b Dr. Wagner Jr. & Gran Markus Jr. & El Hijo del Gladiador, Pegasus Kid & Vampiro Canadiense & 
Rayo de Jalisco Jr. b Negro Casas & Mano Negra & Pierroth Jr., King & Texano & Dandy b Pegasus & 
Vampiro & Jalisco to win tournament 

7/8 Matsuda (All Japan women): Chapparita Asari b Rie Tamada, Infernal Kaoru & Etsuko Mita b 
Tomoko Watanabe & Kaoru Ito, Aja Kong & Suzuka Minami b Toshiyo Yamada & Takako Inoue, Yumiko 
Hotta b Mima Shimoda, Kyoko Inoue & Manami Toyota b Sakie Hasegawa & Bull Nakano 

7/8 Dallas Sportatorium (GWF -250): Mike Davis b Dapper Dan, Marc Valiant b Alex Porteau, Moadib 


b Mr. X, Al Jackson b Ebony Prince, Scott Putski b Black Bart, Moadib won Battle Royal 

7/9 Nassau Coliseum (WWF -3,100): Kwang b 1-2-3 Kid, Duke Droese b Rick Martel, Yokozuna b 
Typhoon, Randy Savage b Jerry Lawler, WWF tag title: Head Shrinkers b Double Trouble, IRS b Tatanka-
DQ, Marathon match for WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart 3-2 (tied, Bret won in sudden death after 60:00 
expired) 

7/9 Sapporo (New Japan -6,000 sellout): Black Cat & American Love Machine b Yuji Nagata & 
Shinjiro Ohtani, Jushin Liger b Black Tiger, Power Warrior b Max Moon, G1 tournament final elimination 
matches: Yoshiaki Yatsu b Manabu Nakanishi, Takayuki Iizuka b Shinichi Nakano, Osamu Kido b Tatsutoshi 
Goto, Shiro Koshinaka b Hiro Saito, Non-tournament main events: Steve Regal b Masa Chono, Rick & Scott 
Steiner b Nasty Boys, Tatsumi Fujinami & Riki Choshu & Yoshiaki Fujiwara b Hiroshi Hase & Keiji Muto & 
Shinya Hashimoto 

7/9 Matsue (All Japan): Satoru Asako b Kentaro Shiga, Richard Slinger b Masao Inoue, Kurt Beyer b 
Ryukaku Izumida, Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Tom Zenk & Johnny Smith, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & 
Mitsuo Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Johnny Ace & The Eagle b Giant Kimala II & 
Abdullah the Butcher, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa b Tamon Honda & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi 
& Kenta Kobashi, Mitsuharu Misawa & Jun Akiyama b Stan Hansen & Takao Omori 

7/9 Johnson City, TN (SMW -600): Anthony Michaels b Steve Skyfire 3/4*, Penalty box match: 
Thrillseekers b Well Dunn **1/4, SMW tag title: Brian Lee & Chris Candido b Scott & Steve Armstrong ***, 
Dock fight: Tracy Smothers b Bruiser Bedlam ****, Cage match for SMW title: Dirty White Boy b Candido 
***3/4 

7/9 Los Angeles Olympic Auditorium (EMLL/Mexican Wrestling Federation -1,650): Torito Sr. & 
Tercera Dimension & ? b Renegado Estrada & The Clown & Frankenstein DUD, Lady Victoria b Barbara 
Blaze -**, Super Boy & Capitan Oro & Principe Indu b Volcano Kid (James Aiono) & Metalico & Cosmos 
*1/2, Piloto Suicida & Mercurio b Lover Boy & Bobby Bradley Jr.-COR ***, Enigma de Oro & Kayam b Blue 
Demon Jr. & El Hijo del Solitario *, Los Brazos DCOR Los Mercenarios (Bill Anderson & Tim Patterson & 
Louie Spicolli) **3/4, UWA middleweight title: Ultimo Dragon b Negro Casas ***3/4 

7/9 Nashville (USWA -300): Jeff Gaylord b Tony Falk **, Doug Basham b Spellbinder ***, USWA 
womens title: Debbie Combs b Robbie Rage *1/4, Moondog Spot DCOR Tommy Rich *3/4, Doug Gilbert b 
Brian Christopher-DQ **3/4, First team to win twice wins W*ING tag title: Eliminators b PG-13 **1/2, PG13 
b Nobutaka Araya & Takashi Okano **1/4, Araya & Okano b Eliminators ***1/4, PG-13 b Eliminators-DQ 
**1/2, PG-13 b Araya & Okano **3/4, Christopher & Spot b Rich & Gilbert *** 

7/9 Tokyo Theater (All Japan women): Chapparita Asari b Rie Tamada, Suzuka Minami b Tomoko 
Watanabe, Sakie Hasegawa & Kaoru Ito b Infernal Kaoru & Yumiko Hotta, Etsuko Mita b Toshiyo Yamada, 
Manami Toyota d Mima Shimoda 30:00, Aja Kong & Takako Inoue b Kyoko Inoue & Bull Nakano 

7/9 Caguas, Puerto Rico (WWC): La Ley b Sabu (not original), Bob Rozallo b El Exotico, Doomsday 
(Glen Jacobs) b Invader #1 (Jose Gonzales), Carlitos Colon DCOR Fidel Sierra (David Cannell), Universal 
title: Hurricane Castillo b Dutch Mantel-DQ, Rey Gonzalez b Eddie Gilbert-DQ, Tahitian Warrior (Lloyd 
Anoia) & Mohammad Hussein (Lou Fabbiano) b Pulgarcito & El Bronco 

7/10 Maniko (All Japan women): Chapparita Asari b Rie Tamada, Little Buddha Man b Tsunokake, 
Infernal Kaoru b Tomoko Watanabe, Kyoko Inoue & Sakie Hasegawa b Etsuko Mita & Mima Shimoda, 
Takako Inoue b Kaoru Ito, Aja Kong & Toshiyo Yamada b Yumiko Hotta & Manami Toyota 

7/10 Kahnawake, QUE (Ind -200): Rock & Roll b Sailor Smith, Darkman b Pete McCoy, Kevin Martel b 
Dollar Smith, Sunny War Cloud & Dynamite Dan b Bob Crawford & Jeff Jefferson, Bob Dellasserra b Vic 
Tessier, Tito Santana b Richard Charland-DQ, Rick Martel b Greg Valentine 

7/11 Chino (LLPW -500): Michiko Nagashima b Jen Yamashita, Miki Handa b Michiko Ohmukai, Yasha 
Kurenai b Mikiko Futagami, Jen Yukari & Eagle Sawai b Carol Midori & Noriyo Tateno, Kurenai won Battle 


Royal, Rumi Kazama & Shinobu Kandori b Harley Saito & Mizuki Endo 

Special thanks to: John Clark, Aresh Hamouyan, Chuck Langerman, Rob Feinstein, Jesse Money, Steve "Dr. 
Lucha" Sims, Brian Hildebrand, Tim Whitehead, Ric Davies, Bill Needham, Mike Omansky, Matt May, John 
Williams, James Hoback, Dan Parris, Lou Pickney, Peter Paulsen 

JUNE BUSINESS COMPARISONS 
WORLD WRESTLING FEDERATION 

Estimated average attendance 6/93 2,610* 
Estimated average attendance 6/94 2,940** (+11.2%) 
May 1994 3,570** 
Estimated average gate 6/93 $33,930 
Estimated average gate 6/94 $37,860** (+10.4%) 
May 1994 $57,520** 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/93 0.0 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/94 7.1** 
May 1994 5.0** 
Average cable television rating 6/93 2.1 
Average cable television rating 6/94 2.0 (-5.0%) 
May 1994 2.0 
Major show 6/93 -- King of the Ring (est. 1.1 buy rate/est. $2.6 million gross/6,500 sellout/$78,000 live 


gate) 
Major show 6/94 -- King of the Ring (est. 0.73 buy rate/est. $1.85 million/12,000 sellout) 
Est. Buy rate -33.6%/ Overall PPV show est. revenue -25.4% 
*Denotes all-time record low monthly attendance in recent years 
**Foreign dates not included in average 


WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING 

Estimated average attendance 6/93 825 
Estimated average attendance 6/94 1,150 (+28.3%) 
May 1994 1,460 
Estimated average gate 6/93 $7,500 
Estimated average gate 6/94 $10,200 (+26.5%) 
May 1994 $13,300 


Percentage of house shows sold out 6/93 0.0 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/94 0.0 
May 1994 0.0 
Average cable television rating 6/93 2.0 
Average cable television rating 6/94 2.0 
May 1994 1.9 
Major show 6/93: Clash of Champions -- 6,000 fans/2,000 paid/$20,000/2.6 rating) 
Major show 6/94: Clash of Champions -- 6,700 fans/4,044 paid/$42,000/3.0 rating) Rating +13.3% 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/94 0.0 
May 1994 0.0 
Average cable television rating 6/93 2.0 
Average cable television rating 6/94 2.0 
May 1994 1.9 
Major show 6/93: Clash of Champions -- 6,000 fans/2,000 paid/$20,000/2.6 rating) 
Major show 6/94: Clash of Champions -- 6,700 fans/4,044 paid/$42,000/3.0 rating) Rating +13.3% 

ALL JAPAN PRO WRESTLING 

Estimated average attendance 6/93 3,400 
Estimated average attendance 6/94 1,950* (-42.6%) 
May 1994 3,230 
Estimated average gate 6/93 $115,600 
Estimated average gate 6/94 $68,250* (-41.0%) 
May 1994 $118,520 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/93 100.0 
Percentage of house shows sold out 6/94 50.0 
May 1994 61.5 
Average television rating 6/93 2.9 
Average television rating 6/94 1.8** (-37.9%) 
May 1994 1.2** 
Major show 6/93 -- Budokan Hall (16,300 sellout/est. $840,000) 
Major show 6/94 -- Budokan Hall (16,300 sellout/est. $850,000) 
*All Japan only ran two regular house shows in June so comparisons are misleading 
**Because of time slot change, comparisons are misleading 

NEW JAPAN PRO WRESTLING 

Estimated average attendance 6/93 4,650 
Estimated average attendance 6/94 4,070 (-12.5%) 
May 1994 2,950 


Estimated average gate 6/93 $198,520 

Estimated average gate 6/94 $177,180 (-10.7%) 

May 1994 $103,180 

Percentage of house shows sold out 6/93 50.0 

Percentage of house shows sold out 6/94 76.9 

May 1994 40.0 

Average television rating 6/93 6.0 

Average television rating 6/94 1.9* (-68.3%) 

May 1994 1.7* 

*Because of time slot changes, comparisons are misleading 

EMLL 

The 7/9 return to the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles headlined by Ultimo Dragon retaining the UWA 
middleweight title beating Negro Casas drew an estimated 1,650 fans. Ticket prices were lowered from $32 
to $18 from the previous show to $18 to $10 on this show, so even though the crowd was up about 200 
paid from the last card six weeks earlier, the gate was down. They only flew in seven EMLL wrestlers and 
filled the card out with locals. Reports were the show was okay with the main event of Dragon-Casas hitting 
***3/4 because the third fall was too short. Los Brazos worked with The Mercenaries in the semifinal which 
was a bloody double count out with Brazo de Plata doing his fake heart attack for the second straight show. 
No return date was announced. 

EMLL and the American-based Mexican Wrestling Federation ran a successful show on 7/10 in Fresno, CA 
drawing 2,000, which is great for a show without the wrestlers having any local television exposure, 
particularly when you consider that it was appealing to a Mexican audience using a Japanese wrestler as 
the main event babyface and had no top drawing Mexican faces underneath. Dragon again retaining his 
title beating Casas in a ****1/4 match. The fact that EMLL could draw that well without television is a 
pretty strong indication that it would be an even stronger market for AAA. WWF was in Fresno about a 
week earlier and drew 3,000. 

Pegasus Kid (Chris Benoit) returned on 7/8 to Arena Mexico teaming with Vampiro & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. in 
a four-team trios tournament. The tourney came down to The Cowboys (Silver King & El Texano & Dandy) 
beating Pegasus & Vampiro & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. when Vampiro was pinned in the third fall after a foul and 
post-match saw the two face teams brawl all over the place for several minutes. Earlier in the tournament, 
The Cowboys had won a non-title match over CMLL trios champs The White Wave (Dr. Wagner Jr. & Gran 
Markus Jr. & El Hijo del Gladiador), and after the win challenged for a title match, while the Pegasus team 
had beaten Mano Negra & Negro Casas & Pierroth Jr. in an okay match, with Pegasus and Casas only in 
against one another for a short period so it was kind of disappointing. 

Pantera II captured the CMLL welterweight title from Felino on 6/21 in Cuernavaca. 

Numacchi (Saemi Numata), the All Japan woman wrestler who retired in February, will come out of 
retirement here to team with Reina Jubuki (Akira Hokuto). 

ALL JAPAN 

Pretty uneventful week with mainly weak crowds as well. The only title match of the week had Dan Kroffat 
& Doug Furnas retain the All-Asian tag titles beating Tsuyoshi Kikuchi & Jun Akiyama on 7/6 in Tokushima. 


Tom Zenk returned after testifying on 7/9. 

Television on 7/2 did a 1.2 rating. 

NEW JAPAN 

The two consecutive nights in Sapporo on 7/8 and 7/9 both sold out the 6,000-seat Nakajima Sports Center 
for major shows. The four survivors of a two-night tournament which would determine the final slots for the 
G-1 climax tournament that will be held 8/3 to 8/7 at Tokyo Sumo Hall were Yoshiaki Yatsu, Takayuki 
Iizuka, Osamu Kido and Shiro Koshinaka. 

In the key matches on 7/8, Black Tiger & American Machine & Black Cat beat Shinjiro Ohtani & Too Cold 
Scorpio & El Samurai when Tiger pinned Ohtani; Jushin Liger pinned Great Sasuke in 15:15 with a super 
fishermanbuster, Rick & Scott Steiner beat Hiroshi Hase & Keiji Muto in 20:55 when Scott pinned Muto with 
a DDT off the top rope and Power Warrior & Masa Chono & Shinya Hashimoto beat Yoshiaki Fujiwara & Riki 
Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami when Warrior pinned Fujiwara. The next night saw Liger pin Tiger with the 
super fishermanbuster (This was built up on 7/6 when in a six-man, Tiger pinned Liger with his swinging 
DDT off the middle rope), Steve Regal (who is getting a strong push) upset Masa Chono, Steiners over 
Nasty Boys and Fujinami & Choshu & Fujiwara beat Hase & Muto & Hashimoto when Fujinami made Hase 
submit to the figure four leglock. 

Already rumors that the 1/4 Tokyo Dome main event will be Antonio Inoki's final match vs. Hogan. 

Nasty Boys only other loss this tour was to Muto & Chono. 

Television on 7/2 did a 1.5 rating featuring the eight-man Michinoku Pro vs. New Japan match from 6/15 at 
Budokan Hall. 

After losing to Liger, Great Sasuke issued a challenge for Liger to appear on a major Michinoku Pro card 
putting his IWGP jr. title against Sasuke's independent jr. title. 

They are negotiating to bring back Gran Hamada in August for a match with Liger. 

OTHER JAPAN NOTES 

Pancrase held a show on 7/6 in Amagaseki with a lot of surprises. First off, Renco Parduel, who made it to 
the semifinals of the Ultimate Fight II before losing to Royce Gracie, debuted in the opener and took more 
than 14:00 before he could make Vernon White submit in the opener. Parduel was supposed to score an 
easy squash win to set up a match with Minoru Suzuki on 7/26. The second surprise was that Suzuki was 
knocked out in 3:00 by a knee to the chin as he was going for a takedown by Bas Ruton, a kick boxer who 
has pretty well destroyed everyone he's faced thus far but was considered not to be able to beat Suzuki 
because of the latters' wrestling and submission ability. Then in the main event, Jason DeLucca, who made 
it to the second round of Ultimate Fight II before losing to Gracie, absolutely demolished this group's top 
star, Masakatsu Funaki in 1:01 with a kneelock submission. Speaking of the Ultimate Fight, UF III, originally 
scheduled for Tokyo, will instead be on 9/9 in Charlotte and Wayne Shamrock will be appearing with Funaki 
as his corner man. 

Michinoku Pro announced a major show for 7/30 in Iwate with help from WAR and All Japan women, 
headlined by Ultimo Dragon & Great Sasuke vs. Ginsei Shizaki & Gedo and Sato & Piloto Suicida & Ultra 
Taro vs. Super Delfin & Super Boy & Gran Naniwa. 

Pancrase announced 9/1 in Osaka with Shamrock vs. Funaki on top, and 10/15 at Tokyo Sumo Hall with the 
winner of that match against Suzuki, although the upsets at the show this past week take the edges off 
those matches which were announced a few days before the Amagaseki card. 

Rings confirmed a show on 8/27 in Russia with Akira Maeda vs. Andre Kopilov, Volk Han vs. Sotir Gotchev 
and Nikolai Zouev vs. Mitsuya Nagai as the headliners. 


The magazines this past week featured as their main stories that Seiji Sakaguchi of New Japan and Antonio 
Pena have reached an agreement and that AAA will send a whole crew for a New Japan tour by the end of 
the year, probably starting by sending in a tag team in October for the tag team tournament. Speaking of 
magazines, WCW officials explained the Clash finish so well to the press that every magazine in Japan 
reported that Johnny B. Badd beat Steve Austin to win the U.S. title. 
Pena have reached an agreement and that AAA will send a whole crew for a New Japan tour by the end of 
the year, probably starting by sending in a tag team in October for the tag team tournament. Speaking of 
magazines, WCW officials explained the Clash finish so well to the press that every magazine in Japan 
reported that Johnny B. Badd beat Steve Austin to win the U.S. title. 

Magazines were also speculating on which shoot group will sign Royce Gracie. It appears his older brother 
Rixon Gracie, 35, will work for Pancrase. 

NOW has a tour from 7/10 to 7/14 with Chris Adams, Rod Price, Pat Tanaka and Dusty Wolfe. 

IWA changed all its cards so the line-ups listed last time are out. 7/14 will have Canek & Crash the 
Terminator vs. Head Hunters on top. 7/16 has Nobutaka Araya vs. Dick Slater, Yukihiro Kanemura vs. Tracy 
Smothers and Head Hunters vs. Crash & Takashi Okano. 7/17 is Hunters & Johnny Gomez vs. Araya & 
Crash & Slater. 

As of 7/4, standings in the All Japan women Grand Prix tournament are Yumiko Hotta with nine points, 
Sakie Hasegawa with eight, Takako Inoue with seven, Suzuka Minami with six and Toshiyo Yamada with 
five. 7/16 is a TV taping in Omiya with Aja Kong & Bull Nakano & Minami vs. Hotta & Kyoko Inoue & 
Manami Toyota, Yamada vs. Hasegawa and Takako vs. Mima Shimoda. 7/17 back at Korakuen Hall has 
Kyoko Inoue defending the All-Pacific strap against Takako Inoue, Yamada & Hasegawa vs. Toyota & Kaoru 
Ito, Nakano & Etsuko Mita & Shimoda vs. Kong & Hotta & Rie Tamada. Mariko Yoshida, who has been out 
of action for more than one year with a broken neck,will return on these shows in five minute exhibition 
matches leading to her full-fledged return on 8/24 at Budokan Hall. Reggie Bennett starts as a full-timer 
next month. Nakano is out of action with an injury, which may or may not be an angle for 7/14. On 7/11 at 
the LLPW show, Shinobu Kandori, who faces Bull in a chain match, "accidentally" was kicked in the eye by 
tag partner Rumi Kazama, went berserk and destroyed Mizuki Endo with the armbar, and sold the eye huge 
which was an angle to work an injury for the big match. Combat Toyoda of FMW appeared at the show and 
did a stare-down in the aisle with Eagle Sawai and the two were held apart by the other women after 
Eagle's match after issuing challenges over the p.a. to build-up their meeting on 7/14. 

USWA 

Although Sid Vicious debuted on the 7/4 show in Memphis doing a run-in, he wasn't at television now billed 
for this week's card, although they pushed the fact he was there hard enough to make it appear that he'll 
be back. He looked to be about the same size as when last seen on a national basis in October. 

The 7/4 show drew about 1,250 fans and $5,000 (all tickets were $4). 

Television on 7/9 opened with PG-13 defending the so-called W*ING tag team trophy against Masters of 
the Orient (Takashi Okano & Nobutaka Araya), who were in their last USWA match before returning for the 
IWA tour that starts 7/14. PG-13 won the match. After the match, The Eliminators came out and challenged 
them and they got into a brawl which saw the Eliminators bust the W*ING trophy. Speaking of Eliminators, 
they shot some publicity photos with Harvey Whippleman as their manager, which apparently means they'll 
be getting a shot with WWF, which is a surprise given that one of the two (the one who isn't Perry Saturn) 
has only been wrestling for a few months and is still really green. 

They aired a clip from 7/4 with Jerry Lawler defending the Unified title against Tommy Rich. After a ref 
bump, Dream Machine came down and hit Lawler with a chain and Rich had him pinned, but Frank Morrell 
saw what happened and instead disqualified Rich. 

They also aired a clip of the six-man handcuff match from 7/4 with Lawler & Brian Christopher & Moondog 
Spot vs. Rich & Doug Gilbert & Machine. Everyone was handcuffed to their corners except Lawler and Rich 
when Vicious came out and choke-slammed Lawler, who sold the move great, like he was dead. Vicious 
said that he was in to stay, which certainly doesn't constitute truth in advertising. They aired an interview 
from WWF where Jim Ross interviewed Lawler, who was a face, talking about his barbed wire match with 
Rich. 


Christopher than challenged Machine which ended with Doug Gilbert interfering, followed by Moondog Spot 
with garbage cans and boards, Rich and finally the return of manager Scott Bowden, who gave Gilbert a 
bottle which he broke on Christopher's head. 
with garbage cans and boards, Rich and finally the return of manager Scott Bowden, who gave Gilbert a 
bottle which he broke on Christopher's head. 

Another match from 7/4 aired with Koko Ware vs. Reggie B. Fine ending when Koko hit the ref and was 
suspended (ironic since he's was advertised on all the spot shows). 

Christopher & Spot did an interview where Christopher said they were bringing a second Moondog back for 
a match with Dream & Rich & Gilbert. 

Finally PG-13 did an interview with J.C. Ice talking about being the son of Bill Dundee and said he'd be just 
like his father, smaller than all the other wrestlers but willing to take a beating and come out the winner. 

7/11 line-up has Spellbinder vs. Jeff Gaylord, Fine vs. Colorado Kid, Bart Sawyer (who returned this week 
from Portland) vs. Tony Falk, Spellbinder vs. Doug Basham, PG-13 vs. Eliminators, Dream vs. Christopher 
for USWA title, Lawler vs. Rich barbed wire and Dream & Rich & Gilbert vs. Christopher & Moondogs. 

Bert Prentice missed all his weekend shots and may or may not come back. 

SMW 

Jim Cornette must be pulling out his hair over the happenings of this past week which have wreaked havoc 
on his plans for the fall. First off, Jake Roberts departed without warning last week leaving him without a 
top singles feud and having to change the title back to Dirty White Boy before he was planning to do so. 
He then had arranged a "surprise" angle for 7/9 in Johnson City where Chris Walker (the Tom Prichard 
lookalike that was in the WWF until the crackdown on guys with that kind of physique got serious) would 
debut and attack White Boy to set up a feud, which in itself was a gamble because Walker has no proven 
track record to carry a top singles feud. But Walker didn't show up, so who knows the status of that. The 
biggest angle of the fall was scheduled to be a feud where Steve & Scott Armstrong would turn heel and 
feud with their father, but that looks to be either in danger or out the window because Steve Armstrong 
has gotten a regular job with All Japan as The Masked Falcon (a role originally designated for Curtis 
Thompson), to be new tag team partner for The Eagle and will work the last three All Japan tours of 1994 
so he'll have extremely limited availability after mid-August. 

There was still hope Roberts would show up on 7/9 in Johnson City for a cage match with White Boy, but 
he no-showed once again and that pretty well looks to be it for him here. Johnson City was a pretty hot 
show, partially due to Roberts no-showing because they had a great main event. At the show they 
announced that White Boy had won the title earlier in the week and that Roberts no-showed, "either for 
transportation problems or out of fear." They brought out all the heels and had the fans pick who White 
Boy was to face. The promotion didn't do anything to lead the fans in any direction, so the crowd response 
was a legit barometer over who was over and Candido was picked. White Boy pinned him in a hot cage 
match. Brian Lee threw in a glove, but White Boy backdropped Candido before he could use it, then pulled 
out a chain and hit Candido for the pin. After the match Candido & Lee argued for several minutes before 
Fytch calmed them down, but the two didn't want to shake hands when it was over. During the match, 
Candido missed a splash off the top of the cage. 

Candido captured the TV title. Tracy Smothers had retained it five weeks so on the first television show 
taped 7/5 in Warrensville, NC, Candido beat Scott Studd to determine the new champion. 

On the first television show, they aired a Cornette interview from the FITE boardroom saying that Bob 
Armstrong wanted a Coward Waves the Flag match and he wanted a Texas death match, so those matches 
would take place 8/5 in Knoxville and "Night of the Legends" and 8/6 in Johnson City for "Fire on the 
Mountain III" respectively with Bob & mystery partner (Road Warrior Hawk) & Smothers vs. Bedlam & Funk 
Brothers with Ron Wright and Cornette in the respective corners. Bob & Smothers did an interview, bringing 
Wright out as their surprise manager and showing a video from Starrcade '86 where Hawk threw Jim 
Cornette off the scaffold and of course Cornette freaked out finding out Hawk was the partner. On TV this 
past weekend, Bob talked about having a partner to team with him and Smothers, and Scott Armstrong 


said either he or Steve wanted to be his partner but Bob said he couldn't choose between his two sons so 
he was picking someone else. They also announced that on 8/5, Brian Lee & Chris Candido would defend 
the tag belts against Rock & Roll Express and that Rick Gibson (Robert's older brother) would be handcuffed 
to Tammy Fytch and Rock & Rolls all but swore to God that they would win the belts that weekend, and 
with Lee's departure imminent, that would seem to be no surprise. The next night will be the second title 
match with Ricky Morton's hair vs. Fytch's hair. They aired a film of two masked men attacking The 
Thrillseekers. They said that Chris Jericho needed 18-stitches in the back of his head and aired an interview 
with Lance Storm with a bruised up face. The Seekers did an interview asking for the loser leave town on 
the Heavenly Bodies to be waived and they announced that the WWF would be sending the Bodies back for 
ten days in August for street fight matches. It actually wasn't the Bodies in the angle, but the guys in the 
filming did make it seem to be the case. 
he was picking someone else. They also announced that on 8/5, Brian Lee & Chris Candido would defend 
the tag belts against Rock & Roll Express and that Rick Gibson (Robert's older brother) would be handcuffed 
to Tammy Fytch and Rock & Rolls all but swore to God that they would win the belts that weekend, and 
with Lee's departure imminent, that would seem to be no surprise. The next night will be the second title 
match with Ricky Morton's hair vs. Fytch's hair. They aired a film of two masked men attacking The 
Thrillseekers. They said that Chris Jericho needed 18-stitches in the back of his head and aired an interview 
with Lance Storm with a bruised up face. The Seekers did an interview asking for the loser leave town on 
the Heavenly Bodies to be waived and they announced that the WWF would be sending the Bodies back for 
ten days in August for street fight matches. It actually wasn't the Bodies in the angle, but the guys in the 
filming did make it seem to be the case. 

Lee and Smothers had a singles match. Before the match Fytch did an interview saying that she's been 
trying to get out of the hair stipulation but is running out of money. She said she wants the fans to send 
money for her legal defense fund and wanted Bob Caudle to put the address on the screen, but Caudle 
refused. Once the match began, they did a ref bump, Candido ran in and that brought out Rock & Roll, who 
hit Lee with the double dropkick and Smothers scored the pin. 

On the next show, Cornette & Bedlam started the show walking around with picket signs saying they were 
on strike from SMW. They were "on strike" for three segments until Bob Armstrong, Smothers and Ron 
Wright ran them off. 

"The Gangstas" debuted, Sheik Mustapha Saed & New Jack, billed from South Central Los Angeles but 
actually from North Georgia wrestling, doing a heavy black racist angle. They went about as far as they 
could go with it and then farther than that, to the point of saying congratulations to O.J. because now there 
are two less to get rid of and talking about putting the Reginald Denny on those white boys. Let's just say 
the reaction has ranged from one end of the spectrum to the other. If a major promotion attempted to do 
this in a city of any size, they'd either be apologizing for it within a few weeks or be off television. The two 
needed a police escort out of town after the tapings. The two had a great ring entrance and New Jack is 
strong on interviews and the two have improved to being so-so in the ring. Expect Cornette, who has been 
looking for a long time to push black heels to his virtually all-white and he believes borderline KKK-like 
audience, to give these guys a major push. The only reason it hasn't happened yet is because he hasn't 
found a black heel who would do it. 

The final television show (the weekend of 7/30 will be a one hour in studio show with no matches building 
up Night of the Legends) airs 8/6. Steve & Scott Armstrong opened the show talking about how they've 
been waiting for a tag title match and they'd be getting a chance on the TV show. Rock & Roll did an 
interview and they did a photo of what Fytch would look like bald. They started building up the King of the 
Mountain tournament on 8/13 in Morristown, TN. The tag title match saw a ref bump, Fytch interfered, 
Rock & Roll ran in and got the purse from them but the ref saw R&R in the ring and DQ'd the Armstrongs 
who were very subtle about being unhappy about not winning the belts. 

Bobby Blaze has left the promotion, perhaps temporarily, so Brian Logan (Brian Keyes) worked as Kendo 
over the weekend. 

On television this weekend they announced that the original Heavenly Bodies (Don & Al Greene) would be 
brought in for Night of the Legends. 

HERE AND THERE 

The debut taping for Jim Crockett Promotions, as mentioned last week, will be on 7/26, but it has already 
been moved to Chattanooga rather than Rainesville, AL as reported last week. Joe Pedicino will be handling 
the play-by-play with Tully Blanchard doing color. Because of Blanchard's religious work, he's going to play 
a babyface announcer role. Boni Blackstone will do interviews. No word on talent other than it is expected 
that Rock & Roll Express and Jim Cornette will be there from SMW and that Crockett is going to use Tommy 
Rich and Junkyard Dog as his top babyfaces, which doesn't exactly sound promising on the surface. The 
name Ole Anderson continues to surface as being part of this, but Anderson is still on contract with WCW 


working at the training school. The group will be called NWA, and they may run a tournament that night to 
determine NWA world tag team champions. They want to have an NWA champion for the first taping. 
Shane Douglas was offered the role but supposedly the money (reportedly $150 per shot) may not be 
enough to get him to come in. 
determine NWA world tag team champions. They want to have an NWA champion for the first taping. 
Shane Douglas was offered the role but supposedly the money (reportedly $150 per shot) may not be 
enough to get him to come in. 

George "Crybaby" Cannon, a long-time wrestler, manager, booker and promoter, passed away on 7/1 from 
throat cancer. Cannon, believed to be in his late 50s, weighed more than 400 pounds during his wrestling 
days. He had a more-than-two-year horrible battle with the cancer which saw him weighing about 165 
pounds at the time of his death. Cannon, who was the first "Beat the Champ" television champion for the 
old Los Angeles promotion on KCOP-TV in late 1968, was mainly a prelim wrestler based out of Windsor, 
ONT. His biggest career break came in late 1971 when he managed The Fabulous Kangaroos (Al Costello 
and the late Don Kent) to the Michigan-Ohio version of the NWA world tag team titles. He was later the 
booker for Pedro Martinez and Eddie Einhorn's International Wrestling Association promotion in 1975 that 
challenged many of the established NWA and WWWF promoters in a failed attempt to become a national 
promotion. Cannon also managed The Mongols (Newton Tattrie aka Geeto & Bill "Demolition Ax" Eadie aka 
Bolo) and the late Eric the Red in that promotion. Cannon later promoted independent shows under the 
name Superstars of Wrestling, largely in Ontario and Newfoundland, and for a short while was a promoter 
for the WWF during the early stages of the expansion. 

The shoot-style GAME promotion in Los Angeles continues to run at Yoahan Plaza in Los Angeles in Japan-
town with bi-weekly shows, next one being 7/16. From our reports, some of the matches are definitely 
shoots with the guys getting busted and bruised up, and some of them are worked shoots. Those who 
attend have been extremely complimentary. 

Caught several weeks worth of ECW tapes. Boy do I miss Joey Styles as an announcer. They had a ****+ 
match on television with Sabu and Too Cold Scorpio on TV a few weeks back taped from Montgomeryville, 
PA. The show that was scheduled to air on 7/5 was pre-empted because of the O.J. Simpson hearings and 
follow-up news coverage. Paul E. Dangerously did an interview going nuts about O.J. when the show aired 
two days later. This group also has the most interesting names for its jobbers, many of whom are named 
after local indie promoters that they have heat with like Joel Hartgood (after Joel Goodhart, the former 
Philadelphia promoter) and even cult hero jobber and TV champ Mikey Whippreck was named after Dennis 
Whiprecht, another local promoter. 

Rey Gonzalez & El Bronco captured the WWC tag titles from Tahitian Warrior & Mohammad Hussein on 7/6 
at the television tapings in Tola Alta, Puerto Rico. On 7/9 in Caguas, after Eddie Gilbert was disqualified 
against Gonzalez, Hurricane Castillo did a run in and Gilbert threw a fireball at him. They are building up for 
a ring surrounded by fire War Games type match with Dutch Mantel's team against Carlitos Colon's team. 
Doomsday (Glen Jacobs) is getting a renewed push using the heart punch gimmick, and used it to beat 
Invader #1 in Caguas. 

The Inside Pro Wrestling radio show on Talk America Radio Network airs Saturdays at 9 p.m. Eastern on 
stations in Chicago, Boston, St. Louis, Denver, Portland, Fort Wayne and Providence. For satellite dish 
owners, you can pick the show up on wide band S3, Ch. 9, 6.8 audio. 

Dennis Coraluzzo has shows 8/6 in Jackson, MI headlined by a Texas death match with Sabu vs. Chris 
Benoit, Jim Duggan vs. Ludvig Borga, Black Hearts vs. Osamu Nishimura & Jonnie Stewart plus Johnny 
Gunn, Al Snow and Skinner (Steve Keirn). 

Tom Ramirez, who promoted the AAA show in Las Vegas on 5/28, booked the Silver Nugget for a return 
show on 7/23. With AAA already booked in Chicago, he went after EMLL, but apparently was talked out of 
that and will instead run, with a $25 top price, a show headlined by Papa Shango vs. Virgil and using 
Southern California wrestlers underneath. 

AAA 

Antonio Pena and Juan Francisco Cortez, who run the wrestling end of AAA, were in the United States over 
the weekend meeting with Ron Skoler (who promotes the U.S. shows under the IWC banner) in New York 


and Skoler also has meetings with the Televisa (which owns the company) board in California. 

It appears everything is straightened out regarding the minis and they'll all be staying. 

Los Angeles tickets go on sale 7/18. No definitive word one way or another if there will be a show in San 
Jose on 8/5. 

The television show that aired on 7/9 was done from the studio airing matches from the TripleMania shows 
that didn't air previously in the United States (except for Los Angeles), the Konnan-Jake Roberts hair match, 
the eight man tag from Zapopan with Jushin Liger, the match where Los Payasos beat Los Hermanos 
Dinamita to win the trios belts and the return match between those two teams in a cage. The show 
included six commercial spots for upcoming U.S. shows, three for Chicago and three for New York. They go 
back with up-to-date shows this coming weekend which should be the show taped 7/1 in Veracruz, and the 
card taped 7/8 in Tijuana should air the following week. 

Tijuana drew yet another sellout of 5,500 for what was described as a very entertaining live show with a 
weak main event. On top, Konnan & Perro Aguayo & Mascara Sagrada were disqualified against The New 
Infernales. Konnan looked as big or bigger than the last time he was in Los Angeles. Konnan was either off 
the juice or way down during the last few months, and it was reflected since his wrestling was starting to 
get better. Like many others, he appears to have less stamina and has less agility carrying the added 
muscle. The funny thing is, even at a muscular 205 as opposed to 245, he's still got a better physique than 
anyone else in the promotion so his gimmick works and he's every bit as over at the lighter weight. The 
highlight in Tijuana was a ****1/4 match with local hero Rey Misterio beating Jerry Estrada via DQ, and 
there was another hot match with Tony Arce & Vulcano of the Destructores teaming with Psicosis to lose to 
Latin Lover & Torero & Rey Misterio Jr. Arce, Vulcano and Psicosis also started up a feud with the Dinamita, 
attacking them after their match with Los Payasos. 

WCW 

The next Clash is pretty well set for 8/24 in Cedar Rapids, IA. It appears that one of the matches will be 
Antonio Inoki vs. Steve Regal, and for political reason Inoki will almost have to go over. 

There will be numerous changes on the wrestling hotline as Mike Tenay was asked to do a second date and 
Mark Madden was added, although we're not certain who will be replaced. We've heard conflicting reports 
on the status of Bobby Heenan, although it appears he'll remain on Sundays. Madden will now be put on 
Wednesday rather than Sunday, which is Jesse Ventura's spot. Tenay was asked to do Monday, which was 
Gordon Solie's spot. Apparently Madden, whose move to being a WCW hotline employee spells the end of 
his newsletter column, was told he'd have to submit either a complete script or an outline of a script of 
what he would be saying ahead of time before going on the air. 

Besides the 1.8 on Saturday and 1.4 on Sunday last week, the Pro show did a 1.3 and the Clash replay did 
a 1.4. 

The actual gate in Philadelphia for Slamboree was $33,426, which is a much lower figure than was 
originally reported here. 

Vader was featured in an interview on the "E Network" with the other stars of the movie he did two weeks 
back in Japan. 

The "Thunder in Paradise" episode where Terry Funk has a starring role airs this week. 

Supposedly the word has come directly from the top that the heavy blood violent matches, such as the two 
Cactus Jack matches from the PPV's and the Dustin Rhodes-Bunkhouse Buck first match are no longer to be 
tolerated, even on PPV. The fear is with the national and congressional mood against violence on television, 
Ted Turner, a major public figure who has to be in step with the times, doesn't want to be caught with an 
achilles heel. Since Vince McMahon has also come down hard on the same subject, McMahon must be afraid 
that unless wrestling is toned down, a spotlight will shine on him as well. WCW's television is already edited 


to death in Europe, where the standards on television violence are already stricter. As someone who 
enjoyed those three matches, I don't like this direction, but I also realize that to survive in business in 
1994, you can't ignore the outside world. All the complaining about how it used to be doesn't mean diddly 
if it's going to end up costing exposure in a business in which exposure is the foundation. 
enjoyed those three matches, I don't like this direction, but I also realize that to survive in business in 
1994, you can't ignore the outside world. All the complaining about how it used to be doesn't mean diddly 
if it's going to end up costing exposure in a business in which exposure is the foundation. 

WWF 

No real updates regarding the Joey Marella death. Apparently Harvey Whippleman has told the other 
wrestlers that reports Marella wasn't wearing his seat belt were incorrect. Marella's death wasn't 
acknowledged on any of the television shows or the radio show. Whippleman had also fallen asleep in the 
car, and awoke when the car hit a tree after Marella had fallen asleep at the wheel. 

Business was poor as largely was match quality on the weekend house shows. Meadowlands drew about 
4,000, Nassau Coliseum about 3,100 and Landover, MD about 1,800. Both New York shows were headlined 
by marathon matches with Bret vs. Owen. In both cases, Bret won 3-2, with Owen taking a 2-1 lead and 
Bret coming back. At the Meadowlands, Bret got the sharpshooter on with five seconds left to win the fifth 
fall. In Nassau, they were tied at the end of 60:00 with Bret winning in a sudden death period (around 
1975, WWF booker Pat Patterson, when he was U.S. champion, had a classic Cow Palace main event 
against Don Muraco in a marathon match with the same sudden death finish). Nobody was raving about the 
matches even though the 60:00 was legit. Bret submitted twice both nights. Really, as far as reports from 
house shows go, Bret vs. Owen has to be considered the major disappointment of the year as far as match 
quality goes. 

Also over the weekend, The Head Shrinkers title defenses against Heavenly Bodies matches were switched 
to Shrinkers defending against Double Trouble, since Jimmy Del Rey is still injured. 

There's been serious discussion of bringing Chris Benoit in full-time as part of a pushed babyface tag team. 

Apparently there has already been mentions on television, not to mention in the magazine and on pizza 
boxes of Undertaker vs. Undertaker even though as the storyline had advanced on television, fans aren't 
supposed to know there are two of them. Usually this kind of television not being caught up with every 
other form of publicity doesn't happen here. 

There may be some question as to whether Bruce Hart will be appearing at shows in Bret's corner for 
matches with Owen who will have Jim Neidhart in the corner. On last week's promos for the California 
shows, they mentioned Bruce being in the corner. This week it was just said that Bret may have a family 
member in the corner with a graphic shown of Bruce. 

Television the weekend of 7/4 saw Raw do a 2.4, which is understandable for a show at 9 p.m. that 
evening, All-American a 1.8 and Mania a 1.1. 

For those who listen to the WWF radio show, the regular caller who goes by the name Disco Inferno is Glen 
Gilburnetti, the Georgia indie wrestler who used the Disco Inferno name in Memphis. He's friends with 
Johnny Polo. 

"Summer Sizzler tour" will be in Madison Square Garden, Nassau Coliseum and Meadowlands from 8/25 to 
8/27 with the same three headliners--Bret & Razor vs. Owen & Neidhart, Tatanka vs. IRS strap match and 
Head Shrinkers vs. Michaels & Diesel. For all the positives of adding the special effects and creating a more 
major league entertainment atmosphere at the shows, I think it's more than offset by running three nights 
in succession in the same market with the same line-up as the crowds this weekend indicated. 

THE READERS PAGES 

MISAWA-KAWADA 

Whomever reported to you that the 6/3 Budokan Hall match between Mitsuharu Misawa and Toshiaki 
Kawada was only a **** match must have only watched the first half of the match. The match aired in two 


parts. The entrances, ring introductions and first 18:00 aired on 6/4, while the 6/11 show carried the last 

18:00 along with a significant amount of post-match coverage. Taken out of context, the first 18:00 of the 
match was in the **** range. It was smartly worked, as they established the storyline of the match in that 
the two had faced each other so many times that they "knew" each other's spots. When one wrestler 
would try their signature spot, the other would counter to block it, and often have the counter countered as 
well. The spots fit into the recent history of the feud with Misawa working on Kawada's bad knee, while 
Kawada worked on Misawa's injured upper back. It was all solid, with the highlight being Kawada selling his 
knee. Misawa juiced from the left inner ear at 7:00 after a series of elbows and kicks. The down side was 
that All Japan fans have been trained that these important matches always go so long, so they don't start 
popping big until after they've heard the 15:00 call. Sure enough, the place started popping at 15:00 and 
shortly thereafter, Misawa hit an elbow smash out of nowhere to elicit the first screaming call of "Kawada 
down! Kawada turned the tables in short order, with a Fuchi-style dropkick to Misawa's upper back followed 
by a enzui kneedrop off the second rope. The crowd and announcer were starting to get borderline out of 
control when the television show ended. 
The second show picked up at the Fuchi dropkick, some overlap to bring the match into context. It was one 
great spot after another. Kawada kept trying for the power bomb while Misawa kept trying for the Tiger 
driver. The match and crowd built toward what everyone expected to be the finish, with Kawada hitting a 
dangerous backdrop followed by a power bomb at the 25:00 mark to win the Triple Crown, except Misawa 
kicked out at two-and-seven-eights in one of the greatest near falls I've ever seen. The pop was 
unbelievable. Had Misawa been pinned, this would have been a strong match of the year candidate. 
Instead, they worked another 11:00 of tremendous spots back-and-forth with the crowd and announcer 
going bonkers the entire time since it constantly looked like it might be the finish. The finish was the same 
as in all Misawa-Kawada matches, Kawada being knocked out at the end. The method was a new one. 
Misawa hit a dangerous Tiger driver that looked to be a very risky bump for a wrestler as valuable as 
Kawada to take. Kawada sold the move for what seemed to be 5:00 after the match, while Misawa was in 
the ring selling the effects of being in an epic war. 

I'll give this match the highest compliment possible. I don't ever recall a Flair-Steamboat match this good. 
It was so good that even though the "wrong" guy won for the maximum reaction, it was still an all-time 
classic. The crowd heat was unreal for the last 20:00, while it was the greatest called match I've ever 
heard. The finish was beyond clean and decisive. All Japan has created an organization and style where a 
wrestler as over as Kawada can be completely destroyed in a main event, yet gain from it because it was 
such a good match. The psychology allows the promotion to put on constant perfect World title matches, 
where there is always a clear cut winner and loser, but the challenger can lose and come out stronger than 
before. Kawada has been losing these Triple Crown matches since 1989, but he's still over bigger than ever. 
Let's face it, there isn't a wrestler in the United States anywhere near as over as Kawada. At this point he is 
a clear cut choice for Wrestler of the year, and he's probably pushed past Kenta Kobashi as the best male 
worker in the world. 

My top ten matches of the year thus far: 1) Misawa & Kobashi vs. Kawada & Taue 12/3/93; 2) Misawa vs. 
Kawada 6/3; 3) Misawa & Kobashi vs. Kawada & Taue 5/21; 4) Kawada vs. Williams 4/16; 5) Pegasus vs. 
Sasuke 4/16; 6) Toyota & Yamada vs. Kansai & Ozaki 12/6; 7) Mascarita Sagrada vs. Espectrito 3/12; 8) 
Michaels vs. Ramon 3/20; 9) Kawada & Omori vs. Kobashi & Asako 2/19; 10) Kawada vs. Williams 3/29. 

To paraphrase Karl Marx, Ric Flair is the opiate of hardcores. In the past ten years, there have been many 
great workers that lost it due to age, apathy or injury. When the likes of Dynamite Kid, Barry Windham, 
Randy Savage, Riki Choshu, Tatsumi Fujinami, Yoshiaki Yatsu or Keiji Muto started slipping, they were 
hammered. But for some reason, the same standard hasn't applied to Flair. While admitting that Flair is the 
reason I became a serious fan, I have to say it's time to shake off the stupor and face reality. None of 
Flair's big matches this year have been very good, let alone approaching a match of the year. The most 
overrated was the 4/17 match with Steamboat. The previous night in Tokyo saw some of the best wrestling 
produced all year. While it would be unrealistic to compare Flair and Steamboat with the Super J Cup 
matches, to compare it was Kawada vs. Williams Champion Carnival final is more than fair. Kawada vs. 
Williams had better psychology, contained more advanced moves, it was better executed, more brutal, had 
better selling, more credibility, had a clean and satisfying finish, drew more heat, had a better storyline and 
was more emotional and did a better job of making both wrestlers look strong and did a better job of 


advancing the promotion to the next big match. The reality is Kawada vs. Williams was vastly superior in all 
the items listed above with execution being the only item even remotely close. Flair-Steamboat had a 
noticeable lack of heat, a dreadful finish, antiquated maneuvers and a muddled storyline. It was a *** 
match at best. They shouldn't get bonus stars because they are supposed to have a classic match every 
time out. 
the items listed above with execution being the only item even remotely close. Flair-Steamboat had a 
noticeable lack of heat, a dreadful finish, antiquated maneuvers and a muddled storyline. It was a *** 
match at best. They shouldn't get bonus stars because they are supposed to have a classic match every 
time out. 

Near the end of 1994, the hottest promotion in the world was Pancrase. It was speculated that the success 
of real shooting would likely spell the end for worked shooting. While the new group probably accelerated 
the inevitable drop of Rings, and nobody cared about PWFG to begin with, something strange happened to 
Pancrase and UWFI. Pancrase appeared to peak after a half-dozen shows and lost its fire. Contrast this 
with the phenomenal success of UWFI and growth of Takada into a major superstar. I have some thoughts, 
but am at a loss to identify the key reason. 

I think you'll enjoy the Vader-Tamura match. Smartly worked and good heat. Tamura is one of the more 
underrated workers around. Vader let him look good before beating him. Takada-Albright was similar to 
their previous matches, or perhaps a notch or two down. Other matches had better give-and-take, but the 
heat in the last 5:00 of this one may have been better. Takada is over like hell and he knows it. 

John Williams 

Arcadia, California 

JAMES DUDLEY 

Hall-of-Famer James Dudley 
Was always at Vince McMahon Sr's right hand 
He drove the limo every day 
And did more work than Arnold Skaaland 
But if he came 20 years later 
I'm really sorry to report 
That Dudley wouldn't be driving anymore 
He'd be testifying in court 
Scott Wallask 
Billerica, Massachusetts 

FLAIR/HOGAN 

Being a major Ric Flair fan that had to put up with the constant abuse of Hulk Hogan is better than Ric 
Flair, especially in the mid-to-late 80s, it infuriates me that it looks like Flair will be putting Hogan over 
without the reciprocal happening. I would have thought Flair would have had more pride to prevent this 
from happening. 

Jeff Zinger 

Woodstock, Ontario 

Hulk Hogan and Ric Flair will draw and make money. It will do well enough that they'll extend Hogan's 
contract. Also, Vince McMahon will not spend a day in jail. 


Jim Burgett 

Memphis, Tennessee 

STEROID TRIAL 

Just out of visceral concern for the future of my beleaguered favorite sport, I was almost ready to with 
Vince McMahon the best of luck as he heads to court. When he gave the nod to Bret Hart as his standard-
bearer at the direct expense of Lex Luger, I wanted to believe the man had seen the light. Now after the 
mystifying return of Jim Powers, my faith in him has been severely shaken. Granted Curt Block's disclaimer, 
but Powers is a Popeye who looks like he's eating some very suspicious spinach. One minute the WWF 
comports itself as a paradigm and the next minute the company mirrors a defiant syndicate. I have enjoyed 
the WWF for 20 years and pray for the sake of the wrestlers and the honest employees that the federation 
weathers this storm, but frankly, I don't think a mere slap on the wrist will suffice. What's more, the real 
shame is that professional wrestling can't survive another savage media blitz. 

Edie Bailey 

Aberdeen, Maryland 


__________________

3 NBA Champion (1981, 1984, 1986)
3 NBA Most Valuable Player (19841986)
12 NBA All-Star (19801988, 19901992)
2 NBA Finals MVP (1984, 1986)
9 All-NBA First Team (19801988)
All-NBA Second Team (1990)
3 NBA All-Defensive Second Team (19821984)
NBA Rookie of the Year (1980)
NBA All-Rookie First Team (1980)
NBA All-Star Game MVP (1982)
3 Three-point Shootout champion (19861988)
21,791 Points
5,695 Assists
8,974 Rebounds
NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

33 Larry "Legend" Bird

Dave Meltzer > You

Follow Me On Twitter:@AirJordanFan93
666_The_Game_666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2012, 05:47 AM   #176 (permalink)
Vince gives me a comedy gimmick
 
666_The_Game_666's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 6,121
666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500666_The_Game_666 1001 - 1500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Aug 1 1994 Observer Newsletter: MCMAHON, TITAN: NOT
GUILTY (Conclusion of the McMahon Trial)

Spoiler for August '94 Newletter:
Code:
Wrestling Observer Newsletter 

POBox1228,Campbell,CA95009-1228August1,1994 

McMahon, Titan: Not Guilty 

It was almost like watching a play. The participants--the judge, jury, lawyers, defendants, even the 
audience, and especially the witnesses, seemed more like actors playing a role. It was like something was 
being performed for the entertainment of spectators. But this was real life. And someone's future was to be 
determined for ever more. 

It was almost like watching a soap opera. The human emotion spilled from testimony from both sides. 
Witnesses ranged from being scared to death for their reputations, disinterested in the proceedings, 
outright lying, being turned into pretzels by lawyers, appearing nearly spacing out and being on the verge 
of breaking down from emotion. So were some of the spectators. But this was real life. And the future of a 
multi-million dollar company was about to be determined. 

When it comes to psychology, it was almost like watching a wrestling show. It was like there was a 
Misawa-Kawada match headlining. You know, back-and-forth action with incredible intensity and emotion. 
There were many other similarities to attending a pro wrestling show. Some slow spots. Many spots even 
unbearably boring. A key no-show or two. You pretty much think you know the finish going in, but there 
are still those moments when you are shocked into believing that you may have guessed wrong. But even 
though there were many wrestlers involved, the most famous wrestling promoter in history sitting right 
there, wrestling fans watching, and at the finish, lawyers doing more than one-hour long promos that put 
almost any wrestlers' best interviews to shame, this ending wasn't predetermined, and nobody was there to 
hype a rematch. That was the last thing anyone wanted. After testimony ended on 7/13, the court buffs 
were predicting conviction. The next day, the case seemed to turn almost completely around. 

On 7/18, two of the three charges, those relating to possession with intent to distribute steroids to Terry 
Bollea, were dropped, due to no evidence tying in the alleged activity to the Eastern District of New York 
(which consists of Richmond, Brooklyn, Queens, Nassau and Suffolk Counties) not because of any 
determination as to the merits of the evidence of a crime itself. McMahon's former limo driver, Jim Stuart, 
who never appeared at the trial, was believed ahead of time to be the one who would tie the Nassau 
Coliseum into the case. Without any testimony indicating anything happened at Nassau Coliseum, and the 
outright denying of it by Bollea, the government failed to establish this court as the proper venue for the 
two charges. 

The fact was, no reasonable jury could have found the defendants guilty of the April 13 charge as there 
was nowhere near enough evidence. Even for the October 24 charge the evidence appeared to be 
insufficient and definitely was hazy. Technically, the government still has the option of bringing one of the 
charges, an October 24, 1989 distribution charge (the statute of limitations has run out on bringing back the 
April 13, 1989 charge), in the correct venue, which would be Connecticut, although despite some talk after 
the case as it being a possibility, based on evidence here, it would seem unlikely. The testimony of Bollea, 
the alleged recipient, that he had never received steroids sent by McMahon at the Nassau Coliseum as the 
government had claimed it would prove, and testimony of Emily Feinberg, who was hazy when it came to 
specificity on the subject of where the steroids were delivered, caused 83-year-old Judge Jacob Mishler to 
drop both charges. The fact was, the government never even entered evidence that there were shows with 
Hogan appearing at the Nassau Coliseum on or shortly after those dates (in October, the only Nassau show 
took place four days before Feinberg received the package from Zahorian so it would have been impossible 
for items in that package to go to the Nassau Coliseum, so it was actually very poor detail work in the 


government even alleging it happened or trying that charge in that court). There was an April 24, 1989 
house show at Madison Square Garden, which is not a part of the Eastern District of New York, thus not 
under the court's jurisdiction, which would have been the first area house show with Hogan appearing after 
the April 13 date. Technically the law states anyone who has possession of steroids, and gives them to 
someone else, even if they aren't selling them, is breaking the wording of the law. Bollea's testimony was 
he bought his own steroids, ordered by Feinberg from Zahorian and they were simply delivered to 
McMahon's office, and he picked them up with his paycheck. Even with Bollea's testimony, a legal argument 
could be made by the letter of the law that it was still distribution by the company. Because there would be 
haziness on dates and remembrances of things that occurred five years ago, even though government 
investigator Tony Valenti popped big when the judge said dropping the charge because they didn't establish 
venue would allow it to be re-tried in its correct venue, I'm expecting that won't be the case. 
house show at Madison Square Garden, which is not a part of the Eastern District of New York, thus not 
under the court's jurisdiction, which would have been the first area house show with Hogan appearing after 
the April 13 date. Technically the law states anyone who has possession of steroids, and gives them to 
someone else, even if they aren't selling them, is breaking the wording of the law. Bollea's testimony was 
he bought his own steroids, ordered by Feinberg from Zahorian and they were simply delivered to 
McMahon's office, and he picked them up with his paycheck. Even with Bollea's testimony, a legal argument 
could be made by the letter of the law that it was still distribution by the company. Because there would be 
haziness on dates and remembrances of things that occurred five years ago, even though government 
investigator Tony Valenti popped big when the judge said dropping the charge because they didn't establish 
venue would allow it to be re-tried in its correct venue, I'm expecting that won't be the case. 

To those watching the case from news snippets at home, it probably appeared the entire case was falling 
apart when the charges were dropped. But after Government prosecuting attorney Sean O'Shea finished his 
closing statements on 7/21, those who had been there from the start would have come to anything but that 
conclusion. At that point people were divided in their opinion of the outcome. The wrestling fans were solid 
in belief of acquittal. Many of them had been in denial from the start and saw this as no different than the 
13-day theatrical miniseries it almost appeared to be, with their favorite wrestling federation in the 
babyface role and the government as the heels. As when they attend wrestling shows, they expect the 
babyface to prevail at the end. Court buffs, who knew little or anything about wrestling but get their 
entertainment watching high-profile trials, their opinions were split with the majority believing they would 
come back with a guilty verdict, but even their opinions swayed back-and-forth almost on a daily basis in 
this very confusing case. Most felt the wording of the judges instructions of the law to the jury would 
probably decide the case. It was that close. Too close for comfort. It may have hinged on a word here and 
a word there. In my ever-so-biased opinion, it did hinge on a word here and a word there and the lack of a 
singular substantive action that was PERFORMED. 

Had not Titan Sports discovered the government was investigating Zahorian in 1989 and cut ties with him, 
there was testimony that would make one seriously question whether that act would have been performed. 
I saw it as close even after O'Shea's incredible last-minute performance, a speech that no human being 
would ever want said about them in front of their families, which blew away any wrestler's day before a 
PPV last second sell job for dynamics. 

If I'd been in the jury box, I'd still have voted for acquittal based on the evidence, or lack thereof, of the 
case. I had proof beyond any reasonable doubt that crimes had been committed--by Dr. George Zahorian-both 
before and after 1988, and for that matter by a few of the wrestlers testifying. But those weren't the 
crimes being charged. Zahorian was already convicted on violation of the 1988 law, and has spent years in 
prison for his crimes. I had proof beyond any reasonable doubt that key members of the company were 
aware of Zahorian's activities, and did nothing to stop them until after they learned the government was 
investigating Zahorian. Neither did the Pennsylvania State Athletic Commission, who authorized Zahorian to 
be at the performances. Knowledge of criminal activity and not putting a stop to it is not criminal activity in 
and of itself. The only charge that went before the jury was a charge of conspiracy, with Zahorian as an 
unindicted co-conspirator, to distribute steroids to wrestlers in order to improve their physiques and 
therefore sell more tickets to wrestling matches. The tie-in between the muscular physiques and ticket 
sales, while a valid argument based on examining the business, was never strongly made by the 
prosecution with evidence presented. It was just stated as if saying it was so made it true, and even 
though it was true, it wasn't established in the case as fact. Steroids were distributed to wrestlers by 
Zahorian under illegal circumstances, physiques were improved, and it did lead to selling more tickets to 
wrestling matches but the prosecution really didn't tie those factors together strongly. 

The case was close enough that I felt, and without having talked to any jurors, have a strong feeling that 
the wording of the law would be and was the deciding factor. 

So what is the law? According to the judges' instructions, this is the law in regard to conspiracy as it applies 
to this specific case: 

If two or more persons conspire to commit a criminal offense, even if just one criminal act takes place, 


each is guilty. Because Vince McMahon owned 100 percent of Titan Sports, McMahon and Titan joining 
together to commit a criminal offense would not be conspiracy. It doesn't matter in this case, where it is 
alleged the government was being defrauded because prescription drugs, and later controlled substances, 
were being used allegedly in violation of either FDA or DEA standards, that the government wasn't 
defrauded of any money. Since distribution of steroids by someone other than a physician and by a 
physician without a prescription before November 18, 1988 was a misdemeanor crime, a conspiracy to 
distribute during that time period would be a misdemeanor offense. O'Shea tried to argue differently, 
claiming the defendants conspired to defraud the FDA (which regulated steroid distribution before 
November 1988), which would make it a felony, but the judge didn't buy the argument. Distribution by 
anyone other than a doctor for anything other than the treatment of disease after that point was a felony, 
so if the conspiracy continued past that point, the crime would have become a felony. 
together to commit a criminal offense would not be conspiracy. It doesn't matter in this case, where it is 
alleged the government was being defrauded because prescription drugs, and later controlled substances, 
were being used allegedly in violation of either FDA or DEA standards, that the government wasn't 
defrauded of any money. Since distribution of steroids by someone other than a physician and by a 
physician without a prescription before November 18, 1988 was a misdemeanor crime, a conspiracy to 
distribute during that time period would be a misdemeanor offense. O'Shea tried to argue differently, 
claiming the defendants conspired to defraud the FDA (which regulated steroid distribution before 
November 1988), which would make it a felony, but the judge didn't buy the argument. Distribution by 
anyone other than a doctor for anything other than the treatment of disease after that point was a felony, 
so if the conspiracy continued past that point, the crime would have become a felony. 

Members of a conspiracy do not have to get together and form a conspiracy. They don't have to have a 
written or oral agreement. In one recent conspiracy conviction in the same Long Island courthouse, the 
conspirators didn't even know one another and had never spoken, but had an involvement and both were 
benefitting from the outcome of illegal activities and the jury believed there was a mutual understanding. 
That alone was considered enough. But there has to be an understanding and a common desire that the 
illegal act occur, although each conspirator didn't necessarily need to have the desire for the same end 
result. Without any getting together and working out a mutual plan to commit a crime, one can still be 
guilty of conspiracy. Circumstances of what happened and conduct of those involved can be enough. 
Interestingly, even that broad definition of legal conspiracy was less lenient than other judges in conspiracy 
cases as noted by court buffs, citing other trials. Titan's attorneys from the start had argued a conspiracy 
needed to include a "meeting of the minds" between the conspirators, which there was no evidence of took 
place and almost certainly didn't, but the judge didn't agree with their argument as to the law. 

The key is the government needed to prove the defendants, in this case Vince McMahon, who never took 
the stand in his defense, and Titan Sports, knowingly, willfully and voluntarily joined into a conspiracy with 
the objective of furthering their business. Having a stake in the outcome of the crime is evidence of a 
conspiracy, and wrestlers being more muscular and thus being more marketable is a stake. However, it is 
not a conspiracy when one has knowledge of illegal acts and due to negligence, omission of attempting to 
stop it, or simply mistakenly allowing it to continue, has it continue unabated. They are under no legal 
obligation to stop illegal activity and be charged as conspirators just for failure to stop it from happening. 
One has to willfully and voluntarily enter into the conspiracy. The government's argument that they entered 
into a conspiracy when Pat Patterson was offered Halcyon by Zahorian in 1985 that he didn't ask for, thus 
knew he was peddling drugs, didn't hold water. The best argument that could be made and it came up 
frequently in the trial was that in July 1989, Pennsylvania deregulated wrestling so the commission no 
longer assigned Zahorian to the matches in Allentown and Hershey. At that time, according to the 
testimony of Anita Scales, a current Titan employee whose job then as it is now was to work with 
regulatory boards, was put in charge of hiring a doctor for shows in Hershey since the law was still that a 
doctor had to appear, but Titan was in charge instead of the doctor being assigned to them. She chose a 
three-person medical firm to work Hershey shows, claiming she didn't want to use Zahorian because she 
knew of his reputation and thought that made him bad news, like a similar steroid-dispensing doctor in 
New York that she had gotten rid of. At the August show, another doctor was assigned, but Zahorian 
showed up anyway. Zahorian called Scales numerous times to get the Hershey assignment and said he'd go 
over her head. Scales was later allegedly told by both Patterson and Chief Jay Strongbow to use Zahorian 
because the boys love him. More than a month later, she went into Linda McMahon's office complaining 
about being pressured by Patterson to use Zahorian and Linda told her to do what Pat said. Zahorian was 
at one point tentatively penciled in as the doctor for the December Hershey card, but that assignment 
would up being canceled when Linda McMahon learned of the investigation and the company cut ties. And 
as Titan attorneys Laura Brevetti and Jerry McDevitt noted, at no time after July 1989 was Zahorian ever 
the assigned physician at a Titan Sports show, although he did appear backstage at a show in August. 

That was the missing ingredient the government failed to prove. Entering into. Participation. The tentative 
penciling in of Zahorian could have been the best excuse for that act, but the fact was Zahorian was never 
officially hired so even those who took that argument as the needed example of entering into, that act did 
not actually take place since Zahorian ultimately wasn't hired to work the show. But had they not been 
leaked that information, would the company, in full knowledge Zahorian was dispensing illegal drugs to 


wrestlers, still have hired him to work shows? After reading over the testimony in this case and the memo 
from Linda McMahon to Patterson that the government considered the smoking gun of evidence, you'll have 
to answer that question yourself. If you answer it in the affirmative, you'll realize that sometimes what is 
on the surface appearing to be bad luck is actually good luck. 
from Linda McMahon to Patterson that the government considered the smoking gun of evidence, you'll have 
to answer that question yourself. If you answer it in the affirmative, you'll realize that sometimes what is 
on the surface appearing to be bad luck is actually good luck. 

The memo, as previously reported here, on December 1, 1989, stated: "I spoke to Vince about the fact 
that the State of Pennsylvania is probably going to launch an investigation into the use of all illegal drugs 
including steroids. 

Although you and I discussed before about continuing to have Zahorian at our events as the doctor on call, 
I think that is now not a good idea. Vince agreed, and would like for you to call Zahorian to tell him not to 
come to any more of our events and to also clue him in on any action that the Justice Department is 
thinking of taking. On December 26th, the State Athletic Commission is having a small meet and greet 
session with some of our talent, and I would definitely not want Zahorian there." 

Zahorian started distributing steroids to wrestlers around 1981, before there even was a Titan Sports and 
when its predecessor, Capital Sports, was owned by Bob Marella (Gorilla Monsoon), Vince McMahon Sr. and 
Phil Zacko. He continued what he was doing. He wasn't the only doctor doing it. He displayed numerous 
symptoms of being an obsessed fan in the white coat, who was supplying wrestlers with drugs, no different 
from the local groupies, so he could be "friends" with television stars. By natural progression, it grew into 
what it became, but not because of any overt acts by Titan Sports. Titan didn't need to provide Zahorian to 
distribute steroids to wrestlers because the wrestlers had plenty of other places where they could get 
steroids. They didn't tell wrestlers, or at least in those words, to use steroids as was brought up numerous 
times. The government missed making a key point in response to the testimony that nobody in the 
promotion told them to use steroids (with the exception of Nailz, whose credibility is suspect and Rick 
Rude, whose stories has been told in wrestling for years but the story wasn't as specific in the courtroom). 
Every wrestler saying that was already using steroids. Nobody needed to tell wrestlers that were already on 
steroids to use steroids. Nobody had to tell wrestlers to use steroids when 75 to 90% were on in the first 
place and most of the rest were either freakish, had a gimmick where physique wasn't required, or weren't 
in key drawing positions. 

Within the basic standards of the profession, what was being done was common practice. The human body 
isn't made to withstand the kind of punishment wrestlers give it, or the kind of schedule promoters have 
been known to put wrestlers on. We can all get moralistic, but if you want to see a guy come off the top 
rope night-after-night for years, don't act shocked if he needs some pretty potent pain killers to get to 
sleep or to get through life. If you want to see guys who look like they can bench press VWs, don't get 
moralistic that steroid use is rampant. This isn't meant to condone what happened, because ultimately 
history will record this period as both a successful financially and ugly time due to what was confirmed by 
this trial in the business' history. What started off as the role of a doctor who probably simply wanted 
wrestlers to be his friend and to help them ease their very real aches and pains and simply keep the 
wrestlers going in a brutal profession, evolved by natural causes into illegal drug dealing. The company 
knew of the drug dealing. The company's lawyers argued McMahon didn't know it was illegal. The famous 
memo from Linda McMahon to Patterson in December, 1989, the memo referred to many times by O'Shea 
as "the smoking gun" in the case, telling Pat to warn Zahorian about the investigation and telling him that 
they needed to cut ties with Zahorian mentioned steroids in the category of illegal drugs, so that defense is 
suspicious. Nobody took action to stop Zahorian or other doctors from selling to wrestlers until the heat 
came down. McMahon knew many of the top wrestlers were on steroids, most particularly Hulk Hogan since 
some of his packages were sent right to his office. It's hard to swallow that Emily Feinberg did this without 
McMahon's knowledge, since some of the steroids sent to her went allegedly went to him as well. I don't 
think anyone reading this is naive to believe McMahon thought Hogan was the only one using steroids. 
Hogan was telling kids not to do drugs, and he was selling wrestling tickets, merchandise and even 
vitamins to children based on a physique developed through more than a decade of steroid use. It's old 
news of course, but still a valid point when the argument is made for three weeks in a courtroom that it 
was personal use. He wasn't taking steroids for Terry Bollea's personal use. He was taking steroids for Hulk 
Hogan. That is professional use by a celebrity, who is being marketed as a role model for children and 
using his physique selling vitamins of all things to children. Well, the vitamin company went broke in 1992, 
very shortly after the revelations came out and perhaps he wasn't telling the truth on the subject after the 


Zahorian trial. The company not only knew of his use, but by him picking up steroids right at the office, it 
looks like they condoned that use. And when Hogan lied, the company's official spokesperson compounded 
that lie by repeating it and saying people who came forward calling him on that lie were the ones who 
weren't being honest. That's all water under the bridge. A part of wrestling history. Today is a new day, 
and hopefully the settling of this case, if it is really settled, marks the end of that story if things don't go 
back to the way they used to be. The testimony in this trial justified the bad publicity both Titan Sports and 
Hulk Hogan suffered over the past three years in regard to the subject of steroid use of wrestlers and 
honesty in regard to addressing of that subject. But the testimony did not prove a guilty verdict on the 
charge of conspiracy. 
looks like they condoned that use. And when Hogan lied, the company's official spokesperson compounded 
that lie by repeating it and saying people who came forward calling him on that lie were the ones who 
weren't being honest. That's all water under the bridge. A part of wrestling history. Today is a new day, 
and hopefully the settling of this case, if it is really settled, marks the end of that story if things don't go 
back to the way they used to be. The testimony in this trial justified the bad publicity both Titan Sports and 
Hulk Hogan suffered over the past three years in regard to the subject of steroid use of wrestlers and 
honesty in regard to addressing of that subject. But the testimony did not prove a guilty verdict on the 
charge of conspiracy. 

As the hours upon hours of deliberation grew longer, the more the butterflies of those with casual interest 
and fear of those directly involved grew. This was real life. The kind of real life everyone watching and 
everyone involved will distinctly remember for years. It would not be an overstatement to say the short-
term future direction of the business could have been markedly changed by either the testimony or the 
outcome in this courtroom. 

At about 4 p.m. Eastern time on 7/22, the jury came back for the fourth time, this time with a verdict. 
Earlier in the day they had asked for portions of the testimony of Zahorian, Anita Scales and Emily Feinberg 
to be read to them--all witnesses whose testimony was somewhat damaging to McMahon. There was no 
way of knowing which way the jury was turning, but on the surface it seemed like things were not going 
McMahon's way. Judging from the reaction of those on the defense team, they appeared more scared and 
shaken each hour the jury didn't come back. My own thoughts going in were that he would be acquitted, 
but the longer the jury would be out, the more the chances were that anything could happen. As has been 
said before numerous times, one can never with 100% accuracy predict what a jury will do. I can tell you 
my own reaction, after flying home after the case ended but before the jury came back, and going over my 
notes from the past three weeks. Somewhere between Dallas and San Jose, my own feelings of acquittal 
were greatly wavering. The same question I asked you, I was asking myself. Based on what I saw, I 
believed Patterson did know, as did McMahon, that Zahorian was giving wrestlers steroids. McMahon was 
getting them from him. That point has been conceded from the start. Who was more believable, Patterson 
or Scales and Sharkey, about Patterson wanting them to hire Zahorian? Why else would Zahorian, who they 
themselves knew was a sleaze, be hired unless they were pressured from above? He was penciled in. He 
wasn't hired, so the act of hiring him never took place. But how would the jury look at that question and 
after nearly three weeks of testimony that proved beyond any reasonable doubt that the WWF during the 
time period in question was a drug-infested business and it appeared little or nothing was done to stop it? 

The only thing known was at 6:30 p.m. the previous night, when the judge was ready to dismiss the jury 
for the day, they asked to stay a few hours because they felt they were close to an agreement. But at 9:45 
p.m., there was no agreement and they went home. At 9 a.m. they returned, and as each hour past, the 
tension grew thicker. 

When the jury came in, they read a verdict of not guilty, in regard to Vince McMahon, and not guilty, in 
regard to Titan Sports. The courtroom exploded. The judge warning them that this isn't an entertainment 
spectacle. It only looked like one. But like their favorite entertainment spectacle, there was substantial 
working, conning, stretching of the truth and misleading on both sides. The only difference was the finish 
was real--totally, unwaveringly real. 

"I didn't have a great deal of faith in the judicial system, but I had an overwhelming faith in humanity," 
said McMahon in a press conference after the verdict was read. Legal costs reportedly totalled in the $3 
million range, a sizeable fee since case testimony revealed that in its single most profitable year, Titan's 
before tax profits were $6 million. "I left my fate in the hands of the jury and they responded nicely 
through all the insults the government threw at me." 

"We thought it was an important case to bring," said O'Shea after the verdict. "The case highlighted a 
serious problem in this country among athletes and athletic organizations, so in that sense we're happy. 
Obviously you always want the jury to go your way. We presented substantial evidence, however we accept 
the jury's verdict." 


O'Shea said he couldn't comment about future legal possibilities involving Titan Sports, apparently in 
reference to trying the distribution case in Connecticut, but according to a New York television news report 
that evening, a source close to the judge said it was a possibility. 
reference to trying the distribution case in Connecticut, but according to a New York television news report 
that evening, a source close to the judge said it was a possibility. 

McMahon did an exclusive interview on Ch. 5, the Fox station that carries the WWF syndicated shows in the 
New York market later that evening. 

"It's been an unbelievable ordeal which I wouldn't wish on anyone," he said. "It's been two-and-a-half 
years that no American should endure. It was endured by us and a jury of my peers found us not guilty. 

I was singled out unfairly. I had everything riding on this case. I'd be less than candid to say I wasn't 
nervous. I was definitely nervous." 

When asked about Hulk Hogan's testimony, McMahon had a surprising reaction. "I don't feel bad when 
anyone tells the truth, however it feels bad when someone you worked with takes the stand and does not 
tell the whole truth and all of the truth. That hurt me very badly." 

McMahon also hinted at possible legal action going in the other direction. "As they say in the WWF, keep 
tuned. It could very well be the hunters are soon to be the hunted." 

"There was a lot of evidence we had to consider and we came up with a verdict based on the evidence," 
said one juror as he was leaving the courthouse. Another said, "there wasn't enough evidence." 

What was that evidence or lack thereof? Let's look at highlights of the testimony of the various witnesses 
starting on 7/11. 

************************************************************ 

The day opened with George Zahorian still being cross-examined by Titan attorneys Laura Brevetti and 
Jerry McDevitt. He said that he would be the only person who would know the contents of the federal 
express packages besides the recipient. He said that he never told McMahon he was selling steroids to the 
wrestlers and took no notes for McMahon on who was buying steroids. He said at one point Hulk Hogan 
asked him to send testosterone to Atlanta for himself and Zeus (actor Tom "Tiny" Lister, who wrestled a 
handful of matches after appearing as Hogan's heel adversary in "No Holds Barred"). Zahorian didn't know 
if Zeus was a wrestler or not. Hogan told him to address to package to Vince McMahon in Atlanta, where 
the three were together filming the movie in the summer of 1988. He said he was fairly certain Hogan told 
him the check for the steroids was coming from Titan Sports. He said that when he sent steroids to Hogan, 
that Hogan paid him by personal check. During that 1988-89 period, he said he sold decadurabolin (the 
steroid he was best-known for distributing) for $10 to $15 a vial (the same drug he paid $2.14 per vial to 
the Rugby-Darby pharmaceutical company in Rockville Centre, NY). It was brought up that during that 
period, when strength coach/strongman Bill Dunn was secretly recording him as a government informant to 
catch him, he told Dunn he was selling him the deca for $15 a vial and said it was a lower price than he 
was selling it to the wrestlers but Zahorian admitting he was lying to Dunn when he told him that. He said 
there was no plan between he and McMahon to send untraceable money. He said some of the fed-ex 
packages sent to Titan Sports did not contain steroids, and mentioned one contained Rogaine for Gene 
Okerlund. He said that he found out the wrestlers were sharing needles when shooting steroids and said he 
did everything he could to make sure they wouldn't, so he was sending needles with his steroid shipments. 
He claimed that aside from his conversation with McMahon testified to days earlier (in the 7/18 Observer), 
he also talked to McMahon once when he asked him for steroids and he sent them fed-ex to the office. 
When asked if Feinburg ever placed an order for McMahon, he said he wasn't sure, that it was possible but 
he would say she didn't. He said when he spoke to Feinberg it was more often that not for steroids for 
Hogan to be delivered either to Stamford or Tampa. He also sent packages to Dan Brower, a high school 
friend of Hogan's, who Hogan had told him was accepting packages for him when he family wasn't in 
Tampa. From April through June of 1989 he sent steroids to Brower in Florida on behalf of Hogan. Hogan 
placed the orders himself and paid for them. McMahon never called him to place an order for steroids for 
Hogan, however, there were steroid orders for McMahon placed by Hogan. He said he didn't know that 
Hogan was getting steroids from any other sources, and said that at one point he was sending Hogan HCG 


to increase his sperm count. He had sent a package on 4/12/89 and 6/25/89 to Dan Brower in Tampa. The 
4/12 date is important because it is just one day before the alleged 4/13 distribution date from McMahon to 
Hogan. He said in the two packages to Brower were steroids and HCG to the best of his recollection. He 
also sent syringes with the steroids, and never charged McMahon for syringes. He said if any package was 
sent to McMahon through Feinburg, that the package would have contained steroids. Zahorian said he 
never spoke to McMahon after 6/89 and that the last time he saw him in Hershey, all they did was say hell 
in the hallway. He said he had no recollection of ever receiving a letter in late 1989 from Marge Sharkey, 
which was a key point that was made clear the next day. He said he talked with Feinburg once when he 
called Titan to see if he was welcomed back to work the shows after the commission regulation ended. 
4/12 date is important because it is just one day before the alleged 4/13 distribution date from McMahon to 
Hogan. He said in the two packages to Brower were steroids and HCG to the best of his recollection. He 
also sent syringes with the steroids, and never charged McMahon for syringes. He said if any package was 
sent to McMahon through Feinburg, that the package would have contained steroids. Zahorian said he 
never spoke to McMahon after 6/89 and that the last time he saw him in Hershey, all they did was say hell 
in the hallway. He said he had no recollection of ever receiving a letter in late 1989 from Marge Sharkey, 
which was a key point that was made clear the next day. He said he talked with Feinburg once when he 
called Titan to see if he was welcomed back to work the shows after the commission regulation ended. 

O'Shea then established that Zahorian being in solitary confinement in prison (which the defense tried to 
claim was almost a torture in order to get him to say what they wanted to hear about McMahon) was for 
his own protection as he was in a rough prison with some nasty prisoners. He established Zahorian was 
treated the same after testifying as before, and that no promises were made that his prison situation would 
improve based on his testimony. He also said that he had never had any discussion with McMahon about 
his awards and medical background, since the defense implied that McMahon would have taken his word as 
an award-winning doctor. He said he didn't know if McMahon used or distributed the drugs he sent him, but 
he said the shipments made to Feinburg he could recall were steroids. 

************************************************************* 

Rick Rood (Ravishing Rick Rude) was the next witness, acting very distant and disinterested, making it clear 
he didn't want to be there. Since he is no longer employed with WCW, it's pretty evident that the last thing 
he would want to do was to testify against Titan Sports. Within wrestling there was a very strong sense of 
not wanting anything to happen in this trial because a guilty verdict would hurt the business at a time the 
business couldn't afford it, and if anything were to happen with Titan, WCW wrestlers believed, and 
correctly so, that their own bargaining power in getting good financial deals would be hampered without 
the negotiating leverage of having another job option. This doesn't even consider Rood, after leaving WCW 
on semi-bad terms, probably foresees potential eventual employment with Titan. 

Rude said he wasn't employed at the present time, he had used steroids before working for the WWF, in 
the WWF and after leaving the WWF. When asked how prevalent use was in the WWF, he said he imagined 
that a lot of people were on them. He said he'd hear guys now and then talk about steroids. He said he 
couldn't recall seeing anyone inject steroids and couldn't recall ever seeing needles around. He said he 
heard of wrestlers using decadurabolin, testosterone and winstrol (a veterinary steroid made for livestock). 
He said he never got steroids from Zahorian. He said that on September 22, 1988 he was married and 
wanted to start a family. He said steroids cut down his testosterone levels so he got off steroids. He said 
he had a conversation with McMahon who said he felt he didn't look so good. He claimed McMahon said he 
was happy with his wrestling and interviews but disappointed in the way he looked. Rood said he told 
McMahon he hadn't been partying, but the schedule was demanding. He said that he and his wife wanted 
to have kids so he wasn't on anything. When O'Shea asked if McMahon told him to get on steroids, Rood 
said, "Not in those words." When O'Shea asked what he did say, Rood said McMahon told him that when 
you're down and sore is when you need to push yourself. He may have said gas or juice. I took it to mean 
I wasn't taking anything. 

On cross-examination from McDevitt, Rood said that McMahon never used the word steroids in that 
conversation and McMahon was concerned that he was partying too much. McDevitt asked if he was 
concerned about Rood's smoking and Rood said that he didn't consider himself a smoker although he has 
smoked. McDevitt brought out that McMahon never directed Rude to Zahorian and that McMahon wanted 
him to be in good condition. Rood said that he never injected steroids in front of McMahon because he 
wouldn't put his job on the line and it's something he wouldn't do in front of his boss. When McDevitt said, 
regarding the conversation, if he was sure what he meant in the conversation, Rude said no. Brevetti then 
established that Rude was still doing steroids in WCW, and not for medical purposes. He said he got his 
steroids from a doctor in England who prescribed them for joint pain, he filled the prescription in London 
and brought them to the United States. Rood seemed really unhappy when Brevetti asked that even though 
wrestling is play-acting, do the guys sometimes get hurt? 


*********************************************************** 


Next came the single most controversial witness of all, Kevin "Nailz" Wacholz. The one thing I feared most, 
because Wacholz, by saying McMahon told him to get on steroids, got a lot of local newspaper and 
television headlines, was that his testimony might somehow be taken by the jury as believable and in a 
close case could result in a guilty verdict, which if his testimony was used to be a part of, would have been 
an unfair verdict. 

Wacholz said that he was with Rood on June 6, 1989, in Madison, WI at a WWF television taping when 
Rood's conversation with McMahon took place. He said that Rood and he were together. His version of the 
conversation was that McMahon introduced himself and asked Rood if he was working out regularly and if 
his workouts were going good. He asked Rood if he was going to put some size on. Rood said he was 
working out as hard as he could. He told Rood that in the position he was in, he needed to be bigger. Rood 
said he was working out as hard as he could but the travel and work was hard. According to Wacholz, 
McMahon said, "I suggest you go on the gas." Rood said he wasn't interested in going on steroids at that 
point. When asked why, Wacholz said he couldn't recall. When O'Shea brought up wanting to have kids, he 
said, "Oh, Rude said he was trying to have a child and didn't want to take steroids." 

Wacholz then said in January 1992 in Florida, he went to a television taping to meet with McMahon to 
discuss the Nailz gimmick. He said he and McMahon were the only ones in the conversation, that Patterson 
and J.J. Dillon were outside the door. He said McMahon told him he was going to promote him as a convict 
and that no one could promote a convict like the WWF. Then Wacholz said McMahon asked him if he 
worked out and if he was on the gas. When Wacholz said he wasn't, McMahon chuckled and allegedly said 
you should be. You need to be as big as you can be. Wacholz said that he was 300 pounds and wouldn't 
go on steroids to get a job. He allegedly responded by saying sometime life isn't fair. The ball is in your 
court. Do what you have to do. (Remember this was January 1992 when all the steroid heat was at its peak 
and testing had just begun, so the idea McMahon would have at that point directly told anyone to use 
steroids is exceedingly hard to believe) 

McDevitt brought up that Wacholz was suing McMahon. He then said that he wasn't even in the WWF in 
1989 because he had no WWF contract until March 1992, but Wacholz said he worked the tapings in 1989 
on a verbal agreement. McDevitt brought up Wacholz did a deposition as part of the back-and-forth 
lawsuits involving McMahon and himself and when he talked about the conversation at that point about 
promoting the convict character, in the deposition he never talked about steroids. The deposition said that 
conversation was about what the character's outfit would look like and McMahon told him he could be a 
main event character if he did a good job and talked with him about how wrestlers are portrayed as 
showmen, not as wrestlers. McDevitt brought up not once in his Grand Jury testimony did he bring up that 
story and said that the Nailz outfit didn't even show his musculature, although Wacholz said it did. Wacholz 
said he never used steroids in the WWF. 

Brevetti then asked him if he had any animosity toward McMahon, and he said, "No" (later in the case, 
Brevetti joked the reason he gave that answer was because he didn't know what the word animosity 
meant). When asked if he hated McMahon, he said, "Yeah." 

************************************************************ 

The next witness was Patterson, who said he had been employed continuously with the WWF since 1979, 
which, if that statement wasn't simply an honest memory lapse, means that period where he had 
supposedly quit the company in 1992 would have been yet another work. He said he started as a wrestler, 
became a road agent in 1983 or 1984, moved into the office in 1985 and was made Vice President in 1986, 
a position which currently pays him $3,500 per week. 

Patterson was carved up on the witness stand by O'Shea like a Thanksgiving turkey. While he tried like 
crazy to give positive testimony for both McMahons, he was made to look so foolish he ended up not 
achieving those objectives. 

He was asked if he was a road agent when he learned Zahorian was selling steroids to wrestlers, and said 


he heard rumors about it. When asked if he knew, he said, I heard rumors, yes. When asked when he 
knew Zahorian distributed steroids to wrestlers, he said he didn't know until the last few years, in the late 
80s. O'Shea said that "You saw wrestlers line up to get steroids," and Patterson said No, they lined up to 
get their blood pressure taken. Patterson admitted they came out of the room with bags and they did talk 
in the locker room about gas or juice. Patterson said he never used steroids himself. He admitted never 
complaining to McMahon about Zahorian's behavior. He said he and McMahon never discussed steroids. He 
never called the athletic commission to complain about Zahorian's behavior, and in fact never complained 
to anyone. When O'Shea said, "You knew what he was doing was wrong?" Patterson said, "No." Patterson 
admitted that at one time Zahorian offered him halcyon that he didn't ask for and then said, "You knew he 
was doing the same thing to the wrestlers?" "Yes, I heard he was giving pills to wrestlers." "And you did 
nothing?" "No." "You told Zahorian you didn't like what he was giving to wrestlers?" "He said I'm helping 
the wrestlers. I didn't know what halcyon was." "You knew steroids were bad?" "Sometimes I heard they 
were bad. Other times I heard they were okay if used right." When asked if he ever talked with Zahorian 
about steroids being bad for wrestlers, he said he only talked about pills. "You mean pills including 
steroids?" "No." "You never heard about steroids?" "Never talked about it." 
knew Zahorian distributed steroids to wrestlers, he said he didn't know until the last few years, in the late 
80s. O'Shea said that "You saw wrestlers line up to get steroids," and Patterson said No, they lined up to 
get their blood pressure taken. Patterson admitted they came out of the room with bags and they did talk 
in the locker room about gas or juice. Patterson said he never used steroids himself. He admitted never 
complaining to McMahon about Zahorian's behavior. He said he and McMahon never discussed steroids. He 
never called the athletic commission to complain about Zahorian's behavior, and in fact never complained 
to anyone. When O'Shea said, "You knew what he was doing was wrong?" Patterson said, "No." Patterson 
admitted that at one time Zahorian offered him halcyon that he didn't ask for and then said, "You knew he 
was doing the same thing to the wrestlers?" "Yes, I heard he was giving pills to wrestlers." "And you did 
nothing?" "No." "You told Zahorian you didn't like what he was giving to wrestlers?" "He said I'm helping 
the wrestlers. I didn't know what halcyon was." "You knew steroids were bad?" "Sometimes I heard they 
were bad. Other times I heard they were okay if used right." When asked if he ever talked with Zahorian 
about steroids being bad for wrestlers, he said he only talked about pills. "You mean pills including 
steroids?" "No." "You never heard about steroids?" "Never talked about it." 

At this point O'Shea brought up the memo, the so-called smoking gun of the entire case. At this point the 
testimony got comical. "Is this memo addressed to you?" "Yes." "Was it confidential? "No." "What's the first 
word on the top of the document?" "Confidential." "Vince asked you to warn Zahorian?" "I never saw that 
memo before." "The memo says he talked with Linda," "That's what is says." "You knew Zahorian was 
distributing steroids." Long pause. "Prior to 1986 you knew he was distributing steroids." "Yes." "You knew 
he was giving steroids to wrestlers." "Yes, I heard." O'Shea brought up the July 1989 law change in 
Pennsylvania so the company didn't have to use Zahorian. "You could have used another doctor," Not sure. 
"Did you have a conversation with Anita Scales about this?" "Yes." "You told her you wanted Zahorian." 
"No." "You never had the conversation?" "No." "Isn't it true that Anita Scales wanted to get rid of 
Zahorian?" "No." "She wanted a different doctor." "One time she wanted a doctor for a show in Maryland." 
"Did you have a conversation with Zahorian in which he told you he wanted the job in Hershey?" "No." 
O'Shea when asking Patterson if Scales talked to him about he wanting Zahorian he said "No." 

Testimony with a very nervous Patterson continued the next morning, when O'Shea brought back the 
memo. Patterson admitted the memo was addressed to him, and that his position was Senior Vice President 
of Titan Sports. "Were you the No. 3 person in the company?" "No." "Were you a high up executive in the 
company?": "I don't know. It's just a title." O'Shea noted the first four words in the document written by 
Linda McMahon were "I spoke to Vince." O'Shea noted the memo mentions "the relationship between WWF 
and Zahorian," and Patterson admitted that's what the memo said. "So Dr. Zahorian had a relationship with 
the WWF?" "According to the memo, yes." "After the law changed in July, did you talk to Anita Scales about 
Zahorian," "I had a conversation, don't know what time, date and year." "Did Anita Scales tell you she 
wanted to get rid of Zahorian?" "I had a conversation with Anita Scales, that at one time she needed a 
doctor in a town." "Do you recall Scales telling you she wanted to get rid of Zahorian? "No, sir." "Didn't you 
tell her the boys wanted Zahorian?" "No." "Isn't it true you and Zahorian talked about Zahorian continuing? 
" "No." "Did you know Zahorian told Scales about your conversations?" "No." At this point, O'Shea glared 
like he was really pissed at Patterson. 

O'Shea then showed Patterson an October 1989 memo regarding Zahorian calling about wanting the job in 
Hershey. In the memo, Zahorian called and said Patterson wanted him to work the show in Hershey and 
Patterson said, "Absolutely not." "Between July 1989 and December 1989 you spoke to Linda McMahon 
about continuing to use Zahorian as a doctor?" "No sir, absolutely not." "Look again at the other memo, go 
to the second paragraph and read." "Although you and I talked about continuing to use Zahorian. 

" "According to the memo, you and Linda McMahon talked about it." "I don't recall doing that with Linda 
McMahon." O'Shea said that's what the memo said but Patterson said he had no recollection. O'Shea then 
said that after you got this memo, you let Zahorian know he was being investigated. "Sir, I never saw that 
memo." In more questions, Patterson continued to deny ever seeing the memo but admitted he knew of 
the investigation. "Did Vince tell you to call Dr. Zahorian." "No, sir." "The memo says Vince wanted you to 
call Zahorian and warn him of the investigation. According to the memo, you spoke with Vince about 
Zahorian." "Yes." Patterson maintained he never spoke with Vince. Then, "Did you ever speak with Vince on 
this subject?" "I told Vince I heard Dr. Zahorian was being investigated." He said he suggested to Vince to 


call Zahorian and let him know about the investigation and Vince said, "If you want to, call him." "According 
to this memo, it was his doing." "It was my idea." "How did you learn of the investigation?" "I heard from 
Linda McMahon." "Not from the memo." "No." "But you actually warned Zahorian like the memo said." 
"Yes." "That was after the conversation with Linda McMahon." "Yes." "After the conversation with Vince 
McMahon." "Yes." 
to this memo, it was his doing." "It was my idea." "How did you learn of the investigation?" "I heard from 
Linda McMahon." "Not from the memo." "No." "But you actually warned Zahorian like the memo said." 
"Yes." "That was after the conversation with Linda McMahon." "Yes." "After the conversation with Vince 
McMahon." "Yes." 

Patterson said he called Zahorian at his office and told him to call him back at a pay phone because he 
didn't want to be recorded. When asked "Were you concerned about being recorded by law enforcement 
officials," he said, "I don't know" O'Shea then brought up Patterson's grand jury testimony where he was 
asked the same question and then he responded to the same question, "Definitely, yes." "You told Zahorian 
he couldn't come to the event in Hershey and told him to get rid of records?" "I don't recall." 

Patterson said after warning Zahorian, he warned the wrestlers to stay away from Zahorian and told agents 
to pass the word that Zahorian was being investigated. 

Jerry McDevitt took over cross-examination, basically going through Patterson's wrestling career history, 
trying to imply that Patterson was a guy who knew nothing but wrestling. He tried to establish Patterson 
never saw either memo, that he'd been in wrestling for 37 years since starting at the age of 17 in Montreal, 
came to the United States without being able to speak English and wrestled seven nights a week for $70 a 
week. He tried to establish that Patterson would have no knowledge about what a doctor should or 
shouldn't be doing. Patterson talked about the territorial system, his beginnings with Capital Sports, when 
Vince bought the company from the previous owners, how hard and how long Vince worked at a TV taping, 
how many meals he ate per day (five or six) and Patterson then said he hadn't even heard of steroids until 
the late 80s, which contradicted his testimony about learning Zahorian was giving wrestlers steroids when 
he was a road agent, a job he left around 1985 or 1986. It is understandable to anyone who has dealt with 
Patterson that he simply could have honestly gotten dates screwed up, but hard to believe anyone who was 
a main eventer in numerous different territories in the 60s and 70s and tag team partner with Billy Graham 
would have never heard of steroids until the late 80s. Actually, impossible to believe for me. I first learned 
about steroids hanging around in the back at the San Jose Civic Auditorium in 1971 after Wednesday night 
wrestling shows from hangers-on who freely talked about wrestlers Billy Graham (Patterson's tag team 
partner as NWA world tag team champions at that time) and Paul DeMarco using steroids and that's why 
both were losing their hair, and how this one wannabe wrestler (who did work some professionally) who 
was a local fan was using a steroid called d-bol (short for dianabol) to make his arms bigger but that it can 
give you high blood pressure and acne, and you could lose your hair or get cancer from it. If I, as an 11year-
old, could hear that in the back of an auditorium as talk from guys who simply hung out with the 
wrestlers, it is inconceivable that Graham's tag team partner and the top wrestler in the territory wasn't 
aware of steroids at the time. That also may explain why I was less than impressed by McDevitt and 
Brevetti's attempts to defend use in the time frame 1985-91 by saying that the wrestlers or McMahon 
weren't aware of side effects at that time as we all would be today. He said he was Graham's tag partner in 
1967 (it was really 1971, but that's an understandable mistake since we are going back 23+ years). He 
talked about Graham's physique, having muscles everywhere and said Graham's body was his gimmick and 
that he had charisma and a gift of gab. He said Randy Savage was "very good" but Kevin Wacholz was 
"not really good" at talking. When asked to compare Savage with Wacholz he said, "Some have talent, some 
don't." He said he first heard of steroids as something you use to put weight on, and that using steroids 
when Graham was champion didn't have the stigma it does today. He said the wrestlers never talked about 
steroids then and he didn't know if using steroids violated the law. He said when one person has a gimmick 
that is successful that others copy it, with McDevitt trying to lead Patterson to imply all the steroid use was 
because of the success of Graham (since use exploded in 1985 and Graham's WWWF championship reign 
was 77-78, that's a pretty weak scapegoat--the three people whose success ushered in the steroid era were 
Hogan and the Road Warriors and it would have occurred without them as well if the guys on top were 
being pushed with physique as a major part of their gimmick). When asked about McMahon's admitting 
wrestling was fake, he said, "Ever since I was in wrestling, people would say it's fake. Us wrestlers would 
get really mad. What Vince did was tell the public the truth, that it was sports entertainment. It made a lot 
of wrestlers unhappy." He then talked about gimmicks that guys used based on their past experience such 
as Big Bossman having been a prison guard before being a wrestler and Paul Bearer having been a 
mortician before getting into the WWF. He said he and Vince write scripts mostly at his house and it 
usually takes seven days to put together a week's worth of television scripts. They then brought up Terry 


Bollea and Patterson said he shared the same characteristics as Graham, that Vince created the current 
Hulk Hogan character (not true, the current character evolved in Minneapolis and Japan between Hogan's 
first and second WWF run). Patterson admitted that even though wrestlers don't try to hurt each other, it is 
physically demanding. He said Linda McMahon works 18 hours a day, then talked about the first and third 
Wrestlemania and how they had started planning Wrestlemania III six months in advance of the show. He 
said Hogan and Andre had never wrestled before that match and only wrestled each other once or twice 
after (so much for his memory). He said he never took Zahorian to see McMahon for the conversation 
Zahorian talked about. 
Hulk Hogan character (not true, the current character evolved in Minneapolis and Japan between Hogan's 
first and second WWF run). Patterson admitted that even though wrestlers don't try to hurt each other, it is 
physically demanding. He said Linda McMahon works 18 hours a day, then talked about the first and third 
Wrestlemania and how they had started planning Wrestlemania III six months in advance of the show. He 
said Hogan and Andre had never wrestled before that match and only wrestled each other once or twice 
after (so much for his memory). He said he never took Zahorian to see McMahon for the conversation 
Zahorian talked about. 

Patterson again said he never ordered Scales to hire Zahorian, nor did McMahon ever tell him in Hershey to 
bring Zahorian to him, nor was he even in such a conversation with McMahon and Zahorian about 
dispensing steroids. He said when he heard Zahorian was being investigated, he didn't know it was by the 
Justice Department and said he was concerned with the reputation of wrestling at the time because he 
thought maybe some wrestlers were dealing with him. 

Brevetti took over and Patterson said when he discussed with Vince the investigation, it was in Vince's 
office and nobody else was present. He said whenever he talked to McMahon in Vince's office, the door was 
always closed because he doesn't like to hear any noise at all. He again said he never read the memo. He 
said he never used the word steroids when talking with Zahorian to warn him of the investigation. He said 
McMahon would have never attended a regular house show in Hershey. He said that he was not involved in 
the development of the Nailz character and Brevetti showed a photo of Nailz to show the costume didn't 
reveal his physique. 

O'Shea took over. "Did you say it was the late 1980s when you found out Zahorian was dispensing steroids 
to wrestlers?" "Yes." But in the mid-80s when you were a road agent you knew?" "I heard it but I didn't 
know." "When did you first find out he was dispensing steroids?" "When I was a road agent." "Before going 
into the office around 1985 or 1986?" "Yes." "So it was the mid-80s?" "Yes." 

*********************************************************** 

Next up was Anita Scales, the Director of Compliance and Regulations for Titan Sports for the past eight 
years. She reviews arena contracts, insurance terms, argues indemnity and liability clauses in contracts 
among her other duties, and reports to Linda McMahon. Her job pays her approximately $53,000 per year. 
Scales was a very unique individual. She appeared almost to be sedated on the stand and spent a long time 
thinking before she would answer questions and was careful in her answers, particularly when dealing with 
McDevitt as if she was thinking constantly about trying to avoid being tricked into slipping up as if she knew 
the game ahead of time. 

She said that she had specific instructions when it came to Terry Bollea in that if she needed to contact 
him, she had to do it through Vince's office. It was stated never to call him directly. She then talked about 
the law change in Pennsylvania. She said she didn't even consider keeping Zahorian as a doctor because 
she had heard rumors about him dating back to when they worked in Greenwich, CT. After she made the 
decision she started hearing from Zahorian in early August. He made a number of calls and she became 
very irritated. She made a memo of an 8/7/89 call where she told him she had assigned other doctors to 
Hershey and he insisted it was his town, she responded she didn't believe it belonged to anyone, that Leis 
& Battista (a three-person medical firm) had been assigned it for the Hershey shows for the rest of the 
year. He said he would go over my head and I said to go ahead. 

She said she talked with Patterson sometime between the end of August and October. Patterson said he 
wanted Zahorian to work Hershey and she said No, the assignments were already done. He said the boys 
wanted him. She also got a call from Jay Strongbow very shortly after. He said he was calling because he 
wanted Zahorian to work Hershey. "By this time I was getting very annoyed because I had numerous calls 
from Zahorian's office. I said `No.' He said `the boys need their candies' (virtually all references in 
wrestling I've heard to the term candy refers to barbiturates and not to steroids). I said `they could get 
their damn candies somewhere else.'" 

She said after talking with Scarpa (Strongbow), she talked with Mel Phillips who sometimes got assignments 


from her. She said she asked Phillips what was going on and asked him what the deal was on Dr. Zahorian 
in Hershey. Phillips said he heard a lot of things. He made things available to the boys, he didn't mention 
any particular drug and said he was sleazy. 
in Hershey. Phillips said he heard a lot of things. He made things available to the boys, he didn't mention 
any particular drug and said he was sleazy. 

In the meantime Scales found out Zahorian appeared at the next show in Hershey anyway. "I learned he 
appeared after I had made two other calls. I talked to Bob Marella (Gorilla Monsoon). I called him and told 
him I was being pressured to hire Zahorian. He told me Zahorian was sleazy and there was no room in the 
wrestling business for him and said `you're between a rock and a hard place.' I called Tony Garea. He 
seemed like a sensible person. It was similar to the call to Marella. He said he was sleazy and opened up 
shop. I'd heard the term before. He'd come with a huge bag on wheels. I was left with the distinct 
impression Zahorian dealt in volume." 

She learned Zahorian had still appeared at the Hershey show when he was called by Rene Goulet who 
asked her why there were two doctors at the show. She said she only assigned one. Goulet told her 
Zahorian was there. After that happened she said she went to Linda McMahon. 

"I explained to her that I was receiving pressure to assign Zahorian to Hershey and I had believed it was 
my responsibility to make the choice but I was being asked to assign Zahorian. 

Pat wants me to assign him. I've heard bad things and I don't want him there, and she said do what Pat 
wants." 

Scales said she returned to her office and talked to her assistant, Marge Sharkey, and told her that "I 
refuse to write the sleazebag a letter." But she felt pressured to assign Zahorian to appear at the December 
26 show in Hershey. She had a letter sent to Zahorian and a letter sent to Vincent Gest of the commission 
which said Zahorian would be the doctor at the show. Later she got a call from Elizabeth DeFabbio, Linda 
McMahon's assistant, who asked if Zahorian was working the Hershey show. I said why? She said he can't. 
I said I'll come upstairs. She said she talked to DeFabbio and asked why he can't be there and she said we 
got a call, political in nature, from a lobbyist or a member of a law firm. She said someone wanted to take 
their kids backstage and Zahorian just couldn't be there. I said, `you wanted him there,' and she said he 
can't be there. She said she then went to Patterson and asked if he'd heard about Zahorian and told him, 
`You wanted him there. You get rid of him.' She showed another letter to Vincent Gest on December 4, 
1989, telling him they changed physicians for Hershey writing that Zahorian was unavailable. Unavailable 
was her own word for making him unavailable. 

McDevitt asked her if she sent the letter to Zahorian (about being physician on the 12/26 show) and she 
said yes (this point is important). McDevitt said in his most demeaning voice to her, "Your view of Zahorian 
was based on scuttlebutt" and she said, "That's true." "That scuttlebutt never included specifically steroids." 
"No." McDevitt tried to imply Scales didn't get along with anyone who worked with the Pennsylvania state 
commission (at this point he was defending Zahorian, as Titan's attorneys regularly flip-flopped on 
viewpoints of Zahorian depending on which suited their purpose at the moment, but then again, so did the 
government's attorneys), implying it was her fault and that she didn't get along with anyone. She denied it, 
admitting only to not liking Jimmy "J.J." Bins of the commission individually. He asked if in 1987 Linda 
McMahon ever expressed a desire to her to keep Zahorian, which she didn't. She said that prior to June 30, 
1989, she didn't think she had ever talked to Linda or Vince about Zahorian. She said that nobody told her 
after the law changed to hire Zahorian. He brought up that in 1988 she herself hired Zahorian which she 
said was because she needed a physical on wrestler Allan Coage (Badnews Brown) done in a hurry to get 
him licensed elsewhere and Patterson said to call Zahorian. She said by the time she learned of the law 
change which would put her, and not the commission, in charge of deciding which doctor to use, that 
nobody had told her to hire Zahorian. 

At this point, the judge called Afa Anoia (manager of Head Shrinkers) to his desk because somebody told 
the judge that Afa had been among the spectators mouthing the words "not guilty" directed at the jury. 

Back to action, McDevitt tried to establish Scales as hating all physicians and not just Zahorian in particular. 
He noted that when she hired Dr. Leis for Hershey, nobody at Titan told her to hire Zahorian. McDevitt said 
in the agent report for the first card after deregulation in Hershey where Goulet was the agent, in the 


agents report there was no mention of Zahorian being there or being paid to be there. She said that 
Zahorian never told her that he talked with Patterson. She said he said he was going over her head, but 
didn't mention a specific name. After that point Patterson talked to her but she wasn't sure of the month 
the conversation took place in, and the conversation with Strongbow she believes took place later in the 
same month. McDevitt is his demeaning voice said, "The only thing Patterson told you is Zahorian 
requested to work Hershey." "He said more than that." "Did Pat order you to hire Zahorian?" "Order is a 
strong word." "Direct you." "He requested." "But did he direct you!" (at the point it appeared he was trying 
to bully Scales down and it wasn't working). In September, she still wasn't under orders to hire Zahorian 
because on 9/29 she called Dr. Leis to work the November card. On 10/2 there was another memo saying 
that Zahorian had called asking if they've assigned a doctor for the Hershey show. He asked how we 
choose and we said we work with the building. She said the reason she called Monsoon and Garea to get 
info on Zahorian is she wanted people's opinions that she respected. She said she didn't tell Monsoon she 
didn't want Zahorian because of steroids. McDevitt asked if Strongbow has used the word steroids and she 
said the word was candies. When McDevitt said she didn't know steroids to mean candies, she shot back, 
"I knew they weren't Hershies Kisses." "You told Linda McMahon you were getting pressure from Pat 
Patterson?" "Yes." The defense produced an 11/3 document regarding the 12/26 show which had 
Zahorian's name crossed off as the doctor, indicating the decision to not use him was made before that 
date or before Titan was aware he was being investigated. Scales responded saying they crossed the name 
off after 11/3. McDevitt tried to make the point that Zahorian never actually worked a Titan show after 
deregulation. He also strongly implied that the letter introduced as evidence, written to Zahorian asking him 
to work the 12/26 show was a fraud since it was unsigned, and since Zahorian in his testimony never 
recalled getting the letter and there was no record of any response to the letter which he thought was 
strange from someone who had made so many calls begging to get the assignment. In May 1992, when the 
government investigation of Titan began, she was ordered to give all her files to the company lawyers and 
the letter wasn't in the files. In later testimony she claimed she only gave 80% of her files to the lawyers 
and sometime later found a copy of the letter from a different correspondence file. 
Zahorian never told her that he talked with Patterson. She said he said he was going over her head, but 
didn't mention a specific name. After that point Patterson talked to her but she wasn't sure of the month 
the conversation took place in, and the conversation with Strongbow she believes took place later in the 
same month. McDevitt is his demeaning voice said, "The only thing Patterson told you is Zahorian 
requested to work Hershey." "He said more than that." "Did Pat order you to hire Zahorian?" "Order is a 
strong word." "Direct you." "He requested." "But did he direct you!" (at the point it appeared he was trying 
to bully Scales down and it wasn't working). In September, she still wasn't under orders to hire Zahorian 
because on 9/29 she called Dr. Leis to work the November card. On 10/2 there was another memo saying 
that Zahorian had called asking if they've assigned a doctor for the Hershey show. He asked how we 
choose and we said we work with the building. She said the reason she called Monsoon and Garea to get 
info on Zahorian is she wanted people's opinions that she respected. She said she didn't tell Monsoon she 
didn't want Zahorian because of steroids. McDevitt asked if Strongbow has used the word steroids and she 
said the word was candies. When McDevitt said she didn't know steroids to mean candies, she shot back, 
"I knew they weren't Hershies Kisses." "You told Linda McMahon you were getting pressure from Pat 
Patterson?" "Yes." The defense produced an 11/3 document regarding the 12/26 show which had 
Zahorian's name crossed off as the doctor, indicating the decision to not use him was made before that 
date or before Titan was aware he was being investigated. Scales responded saying they crossed the name 
off after 11/3. McDevitt tried to make the point that Zahorian never actually worked a Titan show after 
deregulation. He also strongly implied that the letter introduced as evidence, written to Zahorian asking him 
to work the 12/26 show was a fraud since it was unsigned, and since Zahorian in his testimony never 
recalled getting the letter and there was no record of any response to the letter which he thought was 
strange from someone who had made so many calls begging to get the assignment. In May 1992, when the 
government investigation of Titan began, she was ordered to give all her files to the company lawyers and 
the letter wasn't in the files. In later testimony she claimed she only gave 80% of her files to the lawyers 
and sometime later found a copy of the letter from a different correspondence file. 

Brevetti brought up Scales had never had a written or verbal communication from Vince on the subject. She 
said that if Vince had wanted Zahorian there, he'd have told her and Zahorian would be there. "If he had 
done that, you'd have hired him!" "I'd have objections." Brevetti pointed out that the situation (hiring 
Zahorian to work Hershey) was no big deal in the grand scheme of things to Scales and therefore, as busy 
as Linda McMahon was, it wouldn't be to her either. Scales admitted Linda McMahon didn't seem to show 
any major awareness of Zahorian. When Brevetti claimed that Linda McMahon's response to do what Pat 
said was more a remark without thinking rather than a major order, Scales shot back, "You're making it 
sound flippant and it wasn't." 

"In April (1994), you knew there would be a trial?" "I assumed there would be when there was an 
indictment. "You've been prepped by the government!" "My version of talking and prepping are different." 
"In April, did you take documents out of your office without knowledge of Titan executives and send them 
to government personnel." "Not in April." It came out that happened last September or October. "You took 
them out of the office, sent them to the government and never told anyone!" "Yes. It was my insurance." 

O'Shea came back and asked when she first heard scuttlebutt regarding Zahorian's dealing and she said 
when she was still in Greenwich prior to September 1986. "Did it come from other members of the 
corporation?" "Someone in the ring crew." O'Shea then brought up McDevitt's point about Zahorian never 
being hired by Titan after deregulation and O'Shea pointed out that he physically appeared at the August 
show. 

*********************************************************** 

Jim "Ultimate Warrior" Hellwig was next. Hellwig came off as honest as any wrestler testifying, but while 
well-spoken, came off as a guy whose brain, or at least memory had been destroyed since he could never 
remember specifics about anything and joked that he couldn't even remember where he was or what he 
did one week ago, let alone a few years ago. He said he used testosterone and decadurabolin both before 
and during his wrestling career. He said he talked about steroids with wrestlers regularly in casual 
conversation. He said 85 to 90% of the WWF wrestlers at the time were on steroids. When asked if 
Hershey, PA was known for any one specific person, he said, "Dr. Zahorian." He said Zahorian made 


available pain medication and steroids to wrestlers, but he said he never got steroids from Zahorian, but 
that he had anything you needed. He learned Zahorian had steroids, sleeping pills and pain medications 
that only a doctor could get. He said he saw nothing peculiar about what Zahorian was doing, and that he 
would see wrestlers carry out white boxes after visiting him. He said that in 1989 Vince McMahon asked 
him whether he could get him HGH (Human Growth Hormone). They then brought up that in February 
1991, after a match at the Capital Centre, at the local Marriott he left his steroids behind in the hotel room. 
After going home to Dallas, he got a phone call from an upset Vince McMahon and said he was caught off 
guard by the call. At first he didn't admit or didn't know they were his steroids and said possibly someone 
had come to his room and taken a shot but that he later learned they were his steroids. They talked at the 
next TV taping and Vince told him things had heated up (this was right about the time Zahorian was 
indicted). Hellwig said he didn't understand why it was a big deal because he thought steroids were legal. 
Hellwig said McMahon never told him at that point not to use steroids. 
that he had anything you needed. He learned Zahorian had steroids, sleeping pills and pain medications 
that only a doctor could get. He said he saw nothing peculiar about what Zahorian was doing, and that he 
would see wrestlers carry out white boxes after visiting him. He said that in 1989 Vince McMahon asked 
him whether he could get him HGH (Human Growth Hormone). They then brought up that in February 
1991, after a match at the Capital Centre, at the local Marriott he left his steroids behind in the hotel room. 
After going home to Dallas, he got a phone call from an upset Vince McMahon and said he was caught off 
guard by the call. At first he didn't admit or didn't know they were his steroids and said possibly someone 
had come to his room and taken a shot but that he later learned they were his steroids. They talked at the 
next TV taping and Vince told him things had heated up (this was right about the time Zahorian was 
indicted). Hellwig said he didn't understand why it was a big deal because he thought steroids were legal. 
Hellwig said McMahon never told him at that point not to use steroids. 

McDevitt questioned him and made the point again Hellwig didn't think what he was doing was illegal. He 
said he started using steroids in 1984 before the Mr. Georgia contest. He said he started using them for the 
same reason everyone else uses them, "for that edge." He said you don't just take steroids and get a 
physique. McDevitt tried to shift the physique focus from the steroids to the training (when, to look like 
Hellwig, you need both, plus diet, plus favorable genetics and favorable steroid receptor sites in the 
muscles) pointing out he sometimes trained at 2 a.m. and watched his diet and that he didn't think steroids 
were bad for him. "I didn't drink or smoke. I'd make the sacrifices to achieve goals in bodybuilding." He 
maintained he had no problems getting steroids before being in the WWF or during, either from black 
market dealers in gyms or from doctors. He wouldn't know where they came from and wouldn't know if the 
steroids he used were real. "No, it was just presumption." He said steroids were used by the wrestlers in 
Tennessee when he was breaking in in late 1985. He's gotten steroids from more than five to ten 
physicians but never from Zahorian. He said he was getting steroids from a doctor in Fort Worth that 
worked for the commission and also for the World Class promotion. "Did he give you a physical?" "No. I 
wanted steroids. He'd write a prescription. I'd go to a drug store." He also got steroids from a gym owner 
in Louisville. Vince McMahon never told him to take steroids and he believed that he was in the inner circle 
so if McMahon were to tell anyone to take steroids, he'd have told him (actually that makes little sense 
because if anyone were to tell anyone to take steroids, the last person they'd need to tell would have been 
Jim Hellwig). He didn't know in 1991 that the law was going to change and that use had already been 
regulated. He noted Vince was upset at him after the incident in Baltimore in 1991. McDevitt noted Vince 
was a bodybuilder and people within that cult are always talking about new substances in reference to the 
HGH conversation. Hellwig admitted he also didn't know what the laws were regarding HGH. 

Brevetti brought up that Hellwig made several million dollars during his five years in the WWF, that his uses 
was a personal choice and that the only person who put pressure on him to take steroids was himself. She 
brought up that on January 25, 1991, McMahon sent a memo to the wrestlers bringing up the impending 
law change regarding steroid possession, and that he was never charged or prosecuted by law enforcement 
regarding the incident in Baltimore. He had no idea if he had ever seen the memo or not. I think it was at 
this point when he was pressed on remembering the memo and the time frame of the ordeal in Baltimore 
when he said that he couldn't even remember where he had been or what he had done a week ago. 

O'Shea than said that in Baltimore, was McMahon mad about you using steroids or getting caught? He said 
getting caught. "He wasn't mad bout you using steroids." "No." "Mr. McMahon knew you were using 
steroids." "Yes." 

After leaving the courtroom, Hellwig was besieged by the television media for their 6 and 11 p.m. 
newscasts. When asked if wrestlers were told to use steroids, he said that was bunk. He then went to an 
attractive female reporter with an analogy--if you were on a job interview and the boss told you to take off 
all your clothes right there and have wild sex, it's your decision. You could say no. 

*********************************************************** 

Next up was Margaret "Marge" Sharkey, who started working for Titan in 1985 from a temp agency and 
now handles domestic event contracts. Sharkey came off as totally credible on the stand, having no motive 
to say anything critical of Titan Sports and seemed to be there to be back-up witness when the Titan 


lawyers attempted to discredit Scales' testimony. 

She was asked if she had gotten a call from Zahorian and said that once when Zahorian called Anita, she 
picked up the phone and talked to him but that only happened once, and overheard the conversation. She 
said she knew they (being her and Scales) didn't want him working events because the word was out he 
was selling pills to wrestlers. She said Patterson called and said that we were going to use Zahorian 
because the boys love him. Sharkey said she talked with Patterson while Scales said it was she that talked 
with Patterson, although it is conceivable that Patterson at some point could have talked with both. O'Shea 
asked if she talked to any agents about Zahorian and she said Anita dealt with the agents. She said in 
November Anita told her we were going to use Zahorian and she was very upset about it. She went to see 
Linda McMahon and came down and was quite upset because we didn't want to use this man. She said she 
then sent a letter to Gest at the commission saying Zahorian would work the next Hershey show. She said 
Scales told her that Linda McMahon said she had no problems with Dr. Zahorian. Sharkey said she wrote a 
letter to Zahorian (the letter without a signature which because of a lack of signature, the Titan lawyers 
tried to claim was never sent to Zahorian although due to Sharkey's credibility on the subject it made it 
seem to be the lawyers were grasping at straws to hurt her credibility) and said she sent it to Zahorian. 
She said it was her practice to xerox letters, often before she signed them and put them into the files, 
which were personal files for both her and Scales. She wrote another letter on 12/4, when she heard a 
bunch of VIPs were coming to Hershey on the 12/26 show and they wouldn't want Zahorian there. "You 
knew people were going backstage during the show and they didn't want Zahorian there?" "Yes." 

McDevitt brought up that Sharkey and Scales were best friends and rode to the courthouse together. He 
asked if they had talked about the trial and she said they haven't discussed anything else for the past year. 
"The prosecution told you not to talk to her?" "Yes." But she admitted they talked while Hellwig was on the 
stand, which is supposed to be a no-no while a case is ongoing. She said she talked to Zahorian once when 
he called asking to work Hershey and when she said others had been assigned, Zahorian told her he'd go 
over her head. That was eerily similar to the conversation Scales had with Zahorian, so either one of them 
was remembering one of the other's conversations as their own (similar to the Patterson story) or Zahorian 
also said the same thing to both of them, which is a possibility since he apparently called on a regular 
basis, so often that Scales considered them a nuisance and wrote personal memos logging how often he 
called. On the 10/2 memo, she said if Anita said she had written it, she would have been incorrect, because 
Sharkey thought she had written it. She said the 11/2 letter to Zahorian asking him to work the 12/26 show 
was written at the request of Pat or somebody upstairs. McDevitt again brought up the point that Zahorian 
never responded as trying to say the letter was really never sent. Since she wasn't in the conversation with 
Scales and Linda McMahon, McDevitt brought up to Sharkey that Scales could have embellished the 
conversation. "I never knew Anita to lie or make up stories." "Does she embellish." "No." "But was she 
ranting and raving (after the conversation with Linda McMahon)?" "We were both very angry." "But was 
she ranting and raving?" "No. We were angry." 

************************************************************ 

Wednesday opened with Doug Sages, the Chief Financial Officer of Titan Sports since October, 1985 on the 
stand. Unlike most of the wrestlers, Sages came off as professional and believable, but he did appear to be 
squirming at points. 

He testified that Titan Sports is a Delaware corporation (because Delaware has favorable tax laws many 
corporations are registered there) and is owned 100 percent by Vince McMahon. It's an S corporation which 
means any income or profits go directly to the owner. He testified that Terry Bollea was a big star and an 
important money maker, but then hedged when asked if he was the company's top attraction and said, 
"One of the top." He was then asked about a May 1988 conversation he had with McMahon about steroids. 
"He wanted to obtain cash to do a transaction in quiet fashion." O'Shea noted in grand jury testimony, 
Sages used the word "untraceable" as to the transaction, but Sages said that was his words and not 
necessarily a word used by McMahon. Sages said he told him to do it and also explained to him how to use 
cash or to use cash or a company check to buy bank checks because your name doesn't appear on the 
bank check, the name of the bank does. When asked if in the conversation McMahon told him he wanted 
steroids for himself and Hulk Hogan, Sages said, "Yes." "Was it between $1,000 and $2,000." "Yes." Sages 
said he got the $1,000 to $2,000 from petty cash. Sages also recalled that at later periods he had 


conversations with Emily Feinberg and said she needed a bank check although he said he doesn't distinctly 
recall the conversations with Feinburg. O'Shea then brought up Sages' grand jury testimony where he 
recalled the conversation better, saying that she wanted to get a bank check for $650 to pay Zahorian and 
Sages said after the discussion a company check was written to the bank, which then wrote their own 
check for $650 to Zahorian. "Was the check for steroids?" "I don't know. I assumed." The company check 
was payable to Union Trust. O'Shea then produced a photocopy of a company check for $650 to Union 
Trust, which was listed on the book as for medical expenses, and a $650 check from Union Trust to 
Zahorian was produced, with the same dates on each--June 21, 1988. When asked about the checks in the 
Grand Jury, Sages said they couldn't find them on the company's microfilm, but said it wasn't destroyed on 
purpose, it just came at a time the company was switching its records to microfilm. Sages admitted he 
didn't have a copy of the check on file and that he or someone in his office searched for it. He said that Mr. 
Morales (Benny Morales), one of his assistants, went to Union Trust to purchase the check. It was brought 
up that Sages appeared twice before the Grand Jury and the first time was asked about any checks for the 
purchase of steroids and said that he didn't recall. He said he searched for documentation before appearing 
before the Grand Jury and didn't know if he had found them, but in testimony said he didn't find them and 
they pointed to this minor contradiction between his two testimonies. "Did Emily come back again and ask 
for a second check?" "Based on documents, we must have had a conversation." He said the second set of 
checks, a Titan check to Union Trust and a Union Trust check to Zahorian, again listed for medical 
expenses, for $530 was written on October 18, 1989, signed by Benny Morales. "Were those checks 
considered a cost of doing business?" "Yes." Sages said they did these bank check transactions often for a 
number of reason, but O'Shea brought up that in Grand Jury testimony, Sages was asked if those kind of 
transactions were unusual and he said "Yes" and admitted it was an usual way of doing business. 
recall the conversations with Feinburg. O'Shea then brought up Sages' grand jury testimony where he 
recalled the conversation better, saying that she wanted to get a bank check for $650 to pay Zahorian and 
Sages said after the discussion a company check was written to the bank, which then wrote their own 
check for $650 to Zahorian. "Was the check for steroids?" "I don't know. I assumed." The company check 
was payable to Union Trust. O'Shea then produced a photocopy of a company check for $650 to Union 
Trust, which was listed on the book as for medical expenses, and a $650 check from Union Trust to 
Zahorian was produced, with the same dates on each--June 21, 1988. When asked about the checks in the 
Grand Jury, Sages said they couldn't find them on the company's microfilm, but said it wasn't destroyed on 
purpose, it just came at a time the company was switching its records to microfilm. Sages admitted he 
didn't have a copy of the check on file and that he or someone in his office searched for it. He said that Mr. 
Morales (Benny Morales), one of his assistants, went to Union Trust to purchase the check. It was brought 
up that Sages appeared twice before the Grand Jury and the first time was asked about any checks for the 
purchase of steroids and said that he didn't recall. He said he searched for documentation before appearing 
before the Grand Jury and didn't know if he had found them, but in testimony said he didn't find them and 
they pointed to this minor contradiction between his two testimonies. "Did Emily come back again and ask 
for a second check?" "Based on documents, we must have had a conversation." He said the second set of 
checks, a Titan check to Union Trust and a Union Trust check to Zahorian, again listed for medical 
expenses, for $530 was written on October 18, 1989, signed by Benny Morales. "Were those checks 
considered a cost of doing business?" "Yes." Sages said they did these bank check transactions often for a 
number of reason, but O'Shea brought up that in Grand Jury testimony, Sages was asked if those kind of 
transactions were unusual and he said "Yes" and admitted it was an usual way of doing business. 

When O'Shea asked if Titan Sports was a profitable company, Sages responded, "Generally speaking, yes," 
and admitted the company has made millions of dollars, as has McMahon. Sages said that in its best year, 
which wasn't specified other than it was between 1985 and 1989, the company made $6 million profit. 

McDevitt cross-examined Sages and pointed to the two checks and said that he didn't know if steroids were 
purchased with the two checks and don't know if the steroids purchased were for his personal use or for 
both he and Hogan and Sages responded, "No I don't." Sages said that he had spent eight to ten weeks 
looking for records of checks to Zahorian and could come up with only two purchases recorded totalling 
$1,180. McDevitt established that by the type of corporation Titan is, the owner has rights to get any of the 
income at any time for any purpose because the company's assets are also his personal assets. He noted 
that the IRS audited Titan Sports every year from 1986 to 1991 and looked into the independent contractor 
status of the wrestlers and hasn't made any challenges to that status (which probably explains why Titan 
wrestlers are now allowed to work indie dates on their days off). McDevitt pointed out that McMahon didn't 
come to Sages and tell him what he wanted the money for in the two check transactions. When asked why 
the checks were labeled for medical expenses, Sages said that because the checks were going to wind up 
with Dr. Zahorian, that a clerk logging them simply saw Dr. before Zahorian's name and assumed, and said 
that nobody from above directed them to be logged as medical expenses. Sages said that the 5/88 cash 
transaction was the only time McMahon told him specifically any money was being used to purchase 
steroids for himself and Hogan and that Emily Feinberg wasn't present for that conversation. "Vince wanted 
cash for a quiet transaction. Untraceable is my word. I left the room and obtained the cash. I asked him 
what it was for. He said steroids." Sages said the checks were fully traceable, said that nobody from the 
FDA ever investigated with Titan Sports any steroid purchases from Zahorian and when asked if anyone 
ever told him to destroy any records regarding Zahorian he said, "Absolutely not." 

Brevetti then questioned Sages and he said that Feinberg never mentioned that the $650 check was for 
steroids, and that he had never had any conversations with Feinberg about steroids, and that McMahon 
never ordered it recorded in the books as medical expenses. 

O'Shea came back with a quick line of questions. "Did he say it (the steroids purchased from the cash 
transaction) were for personal use?" "Yes." "Didn't he say himself and Terry Bollea?" "Yes." "Mr. Bollea is a 
different person, that's not personal use." "Yes." O'Shea also pointed out there were no company records at 
all tracing the first $1,000 to $2,000 and that if the government was investigating Zahorian, because of the 
bank checks, they wouldn't find any checks from Titan Sports. But McDevitt countered establishing if you 
start with Zahorian, then trace it through Union Trust, you'd eventually establish that it was a Titan check, 


so the transactions weren't untraceable. 

*********************************************************** 


Emily Feinberg, the prosecutions' star witness, was next. Feinberg, currently a homemaker, worked for 
Titan Sports from July 1987 through September 1991. During the first year she was the secretary for Dick 
Glover, but after one year was given a promotion to Executive Assistant to McMahon. Her duties were 
secretarial and scheduling, without a lot of paper work. She had both a business relationship with McMahon 
and later they became friends. Feinberg, a one-time Playboy Playmate (which wasn't brought up in the 
trial), is a very attractive woman who "dressed down" in order to downplay her looks. While she was on the 
stand, it was like an eerie soap opera, because it was evident there was far more to the story then ever 
came out. Titan's attorneys dropped hints, but never really established anything other than beginning 
statements that looked to lead somewhere but never went anywhere. It was almost like a schoolyard 
argument between two people, neither of whom starts the actual fist-fight because both are afraid of the 
other. Feinberg had more evidence than any other witness, but was caught on any points in cross-
examination because she denied things outright that either she simply didn't remember or was lying, which 
were later established as fact, and there were contradictions, both major and minor, in her testimony as 
compared with other witnesses talking about the same things and even with her grand jury statement. 
Some of the discrepancies were believable, since the events were five years old, that she didn't remember 
certain things, but the vociferousness of her denials of certain things that wound up being true ended up 
hurting her credibility. 

Feinberg brought her steno notebook pads with her from her days working for McMahon as evidence. She 
was responsible for the drug testing program (this was the pre-steroid drug testing where they were only 
testing for cocaine). Feinberg said that McMahon only cared about cocaine positives, but that numerous 
positives were coming up for drugs like opiates and barbiturates and she said she brought it to his attention 
but he wasn't concerned about anything but cocaine. According to Feinberg, McMahon told her that the life 
of a wrestler is very grueling. They needed drugs to get up, drugs to sleep and drugs to control their roid 
rages. Feinberg said that roid rages were personality flare-ups and that wrestlers would get very angry and 
were prone to fighting and being antagonistic while on steroids. She said people in the office would talk 
about roid rages when the word would get out that wrestlers while in Europe had torn up hotel rooms. She 
said she talked with Patterson and remembered once when Patterson, after a European tour when some of 
the wrestlers were very destructive that he was concerned it was either from cocaine or roid rages. 

Feinberg testified that Hogan was the No. 1 star and most important person in the company and got 
complete star treatment. Office workers would get in trouble if they called him at home. Sometimes the 
company would pay for him to be limo'd around towns or charter flights for him to get home after shows. 

She said she first heard about steroids at the end of the first summer she worked for McMahon. She said 
gas and juice with other terms for steroids and used the term "rigs" for needles. She said she heard the 
terms mostly from Vince and sometimes from Pat. "Everyone talked about it." She said that during this time 
period, her and her husband and her children were great friends with Patterson who was like an uncle to 
her kids. She said that Patterson talked with her about 20 times about steroids. 

She said in June 1988, Vince called her into his office to send a check to Dr. Zahorian, who would be 
sending a package. He wanted her to call Zahorian and to get the address from Anita Scales. He said he 
wanted an untraceable check and she went to Benny Morales in the financial office. When the subject of 
her steno pads were brought up, the Titan attorneys got hot and the judge excused the jury while Brevetti 
questioned her about the steno pads. 

Brevetti made the point that Feinberg had the steno pads in her possession from early 1992 when she got 
them from the Titan offices after she had left the company, until late in the year when she turned them 
over to the government, strongly implying they could be doctored. Brevetti noted that several of the 80page 
notebooks had less than 80 pages, trying to indicate she had doctored the books before turning them 
over. The judge, apparently realizing that crumbling up and throwing away pages in a steno pad as part of 
regular work activity is quite common, threw Brevetti's challenge to the steno pads as evidence out. 


O'Shea then brought up the June 1988 transaction and asked if she was told not to use a corporate check. 
"He wanted something that couldn't be traced." They then noted a listing in her steno pad on June 20, 
1988--"Dr. George Zahorian, Anita, $680, send a MO, Doug, not a corporate check." Regarding that order, 
Feinberg said she didn't call Zahorian to make the order but did call him to find out how much money she 
needed to have sent. "In this case the order had been placed?" "Yes." 
"He wanted something that couldn't be traced." They then noted a listing in her steno pad on June 20, 
1988--"Dr. George Zahorian, Anita, $680, send a MO, Doug, not a corporate check." Regarding that order, 
Feinberg said she didn't call Zahorian to make the order but did call him to find out how much money she 
needed to have sent. "In this case the order had been placed?" "Yes." 

Feinberg said at one point McMahon told her he needed a refrigerator in the office for cold sodas but she 
didn't do it right away. Eventually she did. One day while she was filling it with sodas, she saw a vial of 
medicine, which he later confided in her was a steroid that needed to be refrigerated. 

"Were you asked to purchase steroids for Hulk Hogan?" "Yes." She recalled one of the shipments from 
Zahorian, when McMahon got in, he separated some of the steroids and gave them to his driver to give to 
Hogan, either at the Meadowlands, Nassau Coliseum or Madison Square Garden. She said this happened 
more than once. She said Hogan got the steroids either from the driver or by her sending the packages 
fed-ex to his home (and the defense pointed out repeatedly, the prosecution entered no evidence of fed-ex 
packages sent from Feinburg to Hogan's home, nor was Stuart in the trial to confirm her story). She said 
this happened six or seven times. She said this wasn't a secret because McMahon wasn't secretive about 
steroids. She said she never sent steroids to Hogan on her own. She said Vince would divide up what came 
in his office and ask her to get them to Hulk. She said McMahon started using steroids with Hulk when they 
were doing the movie "No Holds Barred" in the summer of 1988. 

Other note pad items entered into evidence were December 7, 1988--"Needles and stuff" (she said stuff 
was one of her code words for steroids and said the entry meant Vince needed needles and steroids); 
December 20, 1988--"B-12 and rigs" (she said that meant he needed injectable Vitamin B-12 [which 
bodybuilders, football lineman and others wanting to gain weight sometimes use, often in conjunction with 
a steroid cycle to increase their appetite, thus allowing them to eat more food and thus convert more of it 
to muscular bodyweight while on a steroid cycle], steroids and more needles as her usage of rigs she 
claimed meant both needles and steroids); December 29, 1988--"B-12 and rigs" (same); December 30, 
1988--"Rigs at TV? B-12 and rigs again" (It meant to find out whether Vince wanted her to pack steroids 
and needles, he was on a cycle of one day getting a shot, two days off, the notation meant to ask if he 
needed them while he was out of the office for a few days for TV tapings); March 20, 1989--"Give Hulk 
stuff" (that meant get him steroids); April 10, 1989--"Rigs" (a notation Vince needed more steroids and 
needles); April 11, 1989--"Call Hulk rigs" (a note to call Hogan to see if he needed more steroids and 
needles); October 11, 1989--"Zahorian 1 1/2 rigs, batch of deca, 4 bottles of HCG personal $530" (Vince 
wanted a certain gauge of needles, more steroids and four bottles of HCG which he took while on steroids 
at the end of a cycle); October 16, 1989--"Zahorian" (It would have meant call Zahorian to get the order); 
October 18, 1989--"Zahorian deca Zahorian" (That meant to order deca from Zahorian). Feinberg testified 
she received steroids from Zahorian and sent some of them to Hogan. She said that Vince first alerted her 
to the investigation saying he and Linda had heard about an investigation when an attorney friend of theirs 
had tipped them off and said he'd gotten word to the boys not to use Zahorian anymore. 

There were no notations about steroids in 1990. She said in January 1991 the investigation on Zahorian 
was heating up and Vince wanted anything in the file relating to Zahorian to be gotten rid of. On January 
25, 1991, McMahon told her he wanted to check the fed-ex roster and see if there were records of steroid 
packages from Zahorian. That same day she and Vince put together a memo, sent to all wrestlers, which 
basically stated what the laws were regarding steroids and telling the wrestlers if they are using steroids for 
treatment of injuries, to always carry a prescription with them. O'Shea noted that letter was put together 
the same day she was told to destroy records relating to Zahorian. An entry on January 28, 1991 said 
"check roids correspondence" which Feinberg said was an indication he didn't want anything in the office 
traceable to Zahorian or steroids. She said Vince at that time was angry that some of the wrestlers weren't 
listening and were still using Zahorian as a source. She claimed that at around this time, things were really 
heating up and he had quite a few steroids left from his last cycle and asked her to take them home until 
things calmed down. Eventually she thought she threw all the steroids away. She later found one vial, 
which was tested to contain decadurabolin on March 29, 1994. As things later unfolded, it was found the 
serial number on the vial was identical to the serial number on a vial of decadurabolin bought by William 
Dunn from Zahorian on October 18, 1989 when Dunn was working as a police informant, indicating the vial 
appeared to come from Zahorian and was probably sent right around the same time. 


McDevitt went after her hard, because this was by far the most damaging testimony of the trial. She 
admitted to having five visits with the government and about 15 phone calls from government investigators 
after she got in contact with the government in late 1992. When asked who initiated the contact, her or the 
government, she said, "My attorney said we should seek them out." She wasn't subpoenaed (later, while on 
a major role in closing, responding to charges that Feinberg went to the government right after her last 
Titan paycheck, O'Shea stormed back that they were blaming Feinberg for answering a government 
subpoena as any private citizen would, so in that instance O'Shea was mistaken or dishonest, although he 
hardly had a lock in this trial on either of those categories). She admitted talking to the government for 40 
minutes the previous day and they talked about steroid shipments and distribution to Hogan, but said they 
didn't go over questions she was going to be asked. She said she kept no log of her phone calls. She 
testified that Stuart was asked to deliver steroids to Hogan. She said that McMahon contracted hepatitis in 
early 1990 and got off steroids at that point. She said she found the vial of deca under some ski clothes. 
McDevitt acted suspicious of that. Feinberg said she found the deca after dealing with the government, and 
it came as a surprise when she sound it. She said she didn't turn it over immediately to the government but 
didn't know how long it was before she did. She said she turned it over when she realized it could be a 
piece of the puzzle. McDevitt continued questioning her on how it got there. McDevitt established that 
Feinberg kept McMahon's steroids when he was on a cycle, and established that her belief was McMahon's 
final steroid cycle was from October 18, 1989 through December 19, 1989. She had nothing in her notes in 
December 1989 about being told about Zahorian being investigated and said she thought she heard about 
the investigation in the fall of 1990. She said McMahon never told her to destroy any records in December 
1989. She said she didn't remove his steroids from the office and take a batch home, which included the 
aforementioned vial, before his bout with hepatitis. "Did you say six or seven times steroids were 
distributed to Hogan by Vince?" "Yes." McDevitt tried to insinuate some of the notes in her steno pad 
regarding Vince and steroids were simply notes to remember to pack his steroids when he was going out of 
town and he'd be out of town on the day he needed a shot, but Feinberg denied it. He then went through 
packages sent from Zahorian to Feinberg and asked individually if she knew the package contained steroids, 
if she had ordered the shipment, had she talked to Zahorian about the shipment, if she had seen Vince give 
steroids from that shipment to Hogan, etc., and she couldn't specify any clear recollection of any of that for 
the June 18, 1988 package, the July 21, 1988 package (both of which were sent by Zahorian to McMahon in 
Atlanta during filming of the movie; Feinberg wasn't in Atlanta during that time). She also had no 
knowledge of the December 21, 1988 package. 

On the April 13, 1989 package, which was one of the ones charged, she said she didn't know for sure if she 
ordered that package from Zahorian or recall specifically discussing the package with Zahorian, nor that she 
looked and saw what was in the package ("Vince always opened packages"). "Did Vince McMahon open 
that package in your presence?" "I don't know." "Any of the contents from that package delivered to 
Hogan? "I can't say for sure from that shipment. I'd have to know how big it was." McDevitt asked her if 
she ever used the term stuff to describe merchandise, and she denied it, which turned into an interesting 
set-up later. "Do you know if Jim Stuart delivered anything in that package to Hogan?" "I don't know if that 
was one of the times." "Did you fed-ex it?" "I don't recall if that was one of the times." It was then 
brought out that when interviewed by the Grand Jury, Feinberg said she had ordered steroids for Hogan 
three times, as opposed to six or seven in the trial testimony. In the grand jury Feinberg testified that one 
time she saw McMahon physically separate the bottles for himself and Hogan and one time she saw him 
open up a package and take some of the contents out and give to Stuart to deliver to Hogan. In the grand 
jury McDevitt pointed out that Feinberg only mentioned deliveries by Stuart and never mentioned fed-ex 
deliveries as she did in her trial testimony. "Do you have any knowledge if Jim Stuart delivered that 
package?" "No." 

She didn't recall anything about the May 11 and May 16 packages from Zahorian. 

As for the October 24 package, she remembered talking to Zahorian about it asking for decadurabolin and 
HCG. She said she placed the call and ordered needles, a batch ("a lot of bottles") of deca and four bottles 
of HCG. She told Zahorian she was Emily from Vince's office. "Did you mention Hogan's name?" "No, I 
wouldn't have." She said some of those steroids went to Hogan, but she couldn't recall if they were sent to 
a local arena. She said if a fed-ex went to Hogan, she'd have packaged the box herself and had her 
assistant, Kim Degan, send the package out, but Degan wouldn't have known that it was steroids in the 


package. She said she remembered paying for the package by calling finance. She didn't know if it was 
steroids from that shipment she took home, but remembered taking about 15 vials home. "Who decided 
how much of the shipment went to Hogan?" "Vince did." "Was that shipment delivered to Hogan?" "Yes." 
But she couldn't remember if it was fed-exed or delivered by Stuart, but she said it would have been 
delivered one way or another within a week. She said she can recall seeing the packages divided up more 
than one time. 
steroids from that shipment she took home, but remembered taking about 15 vials home. "Who decided 
how much of the shipment went to Hogan?" "Vince did." "Was that shipment delivered to Hogan?" "Yes." 
But she couldn't remember if it was fed-exed or delivered by Stuart, but she said it would have been 
delivered one way or another within a week. She said she can recall seeing the packages divided up more 
than one time. 

McDevitt brought up in the Grand Jury Feinberg said she saw McMahon physically separate bottles and said 
she remembered getting some of them and being told to give them to Stuart for delivery to Hogan. 
McDevitt then pointed out the October Nassau Coliseum show was on 10/20 so that package couldn't have 
been sent to that show. She couldn't remember if she had talked to Hogan about that specific package. 
However, in her December 1992 grand jury appearance, she said the steroids were ordered by Hogan and 
that aside from October 24, 1989, she never ordered steroids from Zahorian. She said she destroyed the 
cover letter from the first time she wrote to Zahorian when ordered to shred documents but that was the 
only document she actually destroyed, and the company still was able to produce a copy of the document 
she shredded from the accounting department. She did say that sometime before March 1991 she 
destroyed drug testing records because things were getting hot, but McDevitt pointed out that there had 
been no government subpoena on those records. 

Brevetti took another approach, trying to portray her as an actress playing a role and seemingly wanting to 
go into her personal character, but then backed off. Feinberg denied being an actress, only a model. She 
admitted being in a promotional video but said there was no script and it was impromptu and she didn't 
consider it acting, although the show has aired on cable. Then Brevetti made a snide remark at her "dressdown" 
outfit and said that wasn't the way she dressed when she was working at Titan, and she said 
actually it was, that she had worn that same outfit to work many times because she had bought it many 
years ago. Feinberg said McMahon told her that Hogan taught him about how to use steroids when they 
were on the set in Atlanta. She said McMahon never asked her to order steroids for anyone except Hogan 
and that she never heard McMahon encourage any wrestlers to use steroids. She said the phrase "bigger 
than life" as it regarded WWF talent wasn't a code phrase for steroid use. Brevetti said that in her steno 
pad it says check roids correspondence and the actual word "destroy" doesn't appear, but Feinberg insisted 
McMahon wanted her to get rid of all records regarding Zahorian. Brevetti then tried to lead Feinberg into 
admitting that because the publicity regarding the investigation had gotten intense, that bad publicity, not 
obstruction of justice, was the primary reason for that (while probably true, if you recall, in January, 1991 
there was no publicity at all regarding steroids in wrestling in the media--the publicity explosion wasn't until 
July 1991 after the Zahorian trial). She talked about the January 25, 1991 memo to the wrestlers and said 
the memo was sent to warn the wrestlers about the change in the law making possession a felony. 
Feinberg said she thought she had accompanied McMahon to the Nassau Coliseum, which contradicted 
Patterson's earlier testimony when he claimed McMahon never went to any regular house shows except 
Madison Square Garden. She said she couldn't remember if she ever saw McMahon in possession of steroids 
in Nassau county after April 13, 1989. She said she never opened and divided a package of steroids upon 
its arrival and never opened a package first, saying McMahon always did that. She then brought up a 
reference to "stuff" in Emily's steno pad where it did refer to Hogan merchandise which she had denied she 
would have done. While this was all going down, Vince McMahon was stoic with his head down, while Linda 
McMahon during Feinberg's testimony was fighting back tears. Feinberg then denied Vince & Linda 
McMahon were in Europe together on a vacation on April 13, 1989, when it was later established that they 
were from 4/12 to 4/17. She also didn't think she was in Los Angeles with Vince McMahon about a week 
later when it was established that was when she filmed the video in Los Angeles. They tried to establish 
that whatever April 11 reference in her steno pad regarding Hogan was because she wrote and sent a 
letter to Hogan because there was a disagreement over whether Hogan or the company would pick up the 
tab for charter flights home from two shows earlier in the month, and not having anything to do with 
steroids. They had a copy of a letter sent to Hogan saying the company was going to deduct nearly $5,000 
from his next check for the flights. Feinberg's employment was terminated in September 1991, but she 
earned her $63,000 salary for a full year after termination. Her husband, who worked for Titan until August, 
1992, left at that time a $130,000 per year deal writing scripts. The two were negotiating for continued 
payment after that point. When Brevetti claimed their lawyer asked for payment after 1992, Feinberg said 
"We were offered that." When Brevetti ever asked if they demanded further payment, she said she couldn't 
recall a demand. A document sent by Feinberg's attorney to Titan, in extent a demand, was entered into 


evidence but Feinberg tried to pass it off as part of an ongoing negotiation process. An interesting 
sequence went like this: "Do you have any intention of writing a book?" (the old discredit them by saying 
they're writing a book) and she said "No." Brevetti, who appeared borderline furious by the response 
(although her lawyer demeanor in trial was to be in the borderline furious phase almost all the time) asked 
if her husband was going to write a book and Emily said that she wasn't going to write a book. Brevetti 
even missed the opening. Brevetti then pointed out that the District Attorney gave her immunity from 
prosecution for her testimony. Brevetti also pointed out in one of her grand jury appearances Feinberg said 
that no package containing steroids was ever fed-exed to Bollea. Feinberg said she didn't write down every 
steroid distribution in her notes. O'Shea then brought up McMahon's memo to the boys talking about using 
steroids for an injury and said, "Did Vince McMahon ever wrestle?" trying to say he wasn't using steroids 
for a ring injury. 
sequence went like this: "Do you have any intention of writing a book?" (the old discredit them by saying 
they're writing a book) and she said "No." Brevetti, who appeared borderline furious by the response 
(although her lawyer demeanor in trial was to be in the borderline furious phase almost all the time) asked 
if her husband was going to write a book and Emily said that she wasn't going to write a book. Brevetti 
even missed the opening. Brevetti then pointed out that the District Attorney gave her immunity from 
prosecution for her testimony. Brevetti also pointed out in one of her grand jury appearances Feinberg said 
that no package containing steroids was ever fed-exed to Bollea. Feinberg said she didn't write down every 
steroid distribution in her notes. O'Shea then brought up McMahon's memo to the boys talking about using 
steroids for an injury and said, "Did Vince McMahon ever wrestle?" trying to say he wasn't using steroids 
for a ring injury. 

*********************************************************** 

The first witness on 7/14 was Detective Gregory Taylor, a police officer with the Lower Paxton Police 
Department in Harrisburg, PA. His only purpose was to bring a vial of decadurabolin then they obtained 
when Bill Dunn bought it from Zahorian on October 18, 1989 that matched the serial lot number of the 
steroid Feinberg had. 

*********************************************************** 

Then came the media circus when Terry Bollea testified. Bollea, who appeared to be scared out of his mind 
at the beginning of his testimony, but got more calm as things went on and he saw nothing was going to 
be brought up to kill his career. Bollea was the only witness who took over the court room with his star 
presence. It was established immediately he was granted immunity on anything he were to testify about 
except immunity from perjury. When asked his job, he said he was self-employed as an entertainer. He 
talked about his tenures with the WWF. He said he started using steroids in mid-1976. All the media reports 
that and the next day reported him admitting to 13 years of steroid use, although his testimony actually 
didn't make that clear. When Brevetti tried to establish 1989 as the last time he used steroids, which would 
have been 13 1/2 years, Hogan danced around the year saying it was shortly after that. He said he used 
oral and injectable steroids including dianabol, anavar, winstrol, testosterone and decadurabolin, using the 
latter the most. He said by 1983-84 when he started his second tenure with the WWF, steroid use was 
fairly common in wrestling. "Was it everywhere?" "That's fair to say." He said 75 to 80%, maybe more of 
the wrestlers were on steroids. He saw steroid use in the locker rooms. He said Zahorian was known for 
supplying different substances to the wrestlers, including steroids, sleeping pills, diet pills, Tylenol III & IV 
and Valium. Bollea said Zahorian never took medical histories or blood tests of him, but would give him 
whatever he wanted. When asked if it was he or Zahorian who would decide what drug and in what 
quantity, he said that he decided. Hogan testified cash advances were available every night, it wasn't 
something given only when Zahorian was there. When asked if McMahon was ever in the area when 
Zahorian was doing this, he said yes. He said he had discussed with Vince ordering steroids from Zahorian 
while they were doing the movie in Atlanta. He said at the time McMahon knew the subject matter. He said 
that he had discussed steroids with Jay Strongbow when Jay wanted to get them for his son. He said he 
got his steroids during the time period in question when he'd call Emily from the road and tell her to call 
Zahorian and make an order. He said his did it ten times or less. He'd get the steroids by going to the 
office and picking them up with his paycheck. He said most of the time he either wrote a check or paid 
cash for his steroids. There were times he wouldn't pay for the steroids because he was being repaid for 
steroids he had given McMahon earlier. When O'Shea asked if his buying steroids was just like him writing a 
check for car insurance, he replied, buying steroids was more frequent. He said Patterson had told him 
about the investigation of Zahorian. He told him not to use him anymore. "Did he tell you to get off 
steroids?" "No." He said Vince also told him not to use Zahorian. 

At this point, Hogan looked very sad and scared, actually holding back tears. He admitted to carrying 
steroids with him on the road. He said he used steroids to heal injuries, to keep going on a tough schedule 
and for bodybuilding. He started using them because he wanted to get big. At this point O'Shea started 
asking about the Howard Finkel HIV blood test, but after Titan's lawyers objected, the judge wouldn't allow 
him to ask questions on that matter. "You made many statements in the press after the Zahorian trial?" 
"Yes." "Were those statements true?" "No." 


Brevetti tried to establish that during 1989, the WWF wasn't running the Meadowlands (they were doing the 
power play trying to keep WCW out, which didn't work, so they pulled out of the building until WCW killed 
itself in the market) although Hogan couldn't recall that. "You stopped using steroids in 1989." "Around that 
time. A little after." In 1989 he and his wife decided he would wind down his steroid use because they 
wanted to have a second child. Brevetti pointed out that nine months before his son Nicholas was born, 
thus when he was conceived, would have been before October 1989, trying to indicate he wouldn't have 
even been on steroids anymore when the October 24 package arrived, but Hogan said that wasn't the case. 
Hogan said his wife got pregnant while he was on steroids and it was one of the biggest arguments he and 
his wife ever had when she found out he had gotten her pregnant while he was still on steroids. Brevetti 
thought she caught him in a contradiction or lie and brought up his Grand Jury testimony talking about he 
and his wife discussing he'd get off steroids before they had their second child. She asked if he was truthful 
to the Grand Jury and he said he was, that they had DISCUSSED not having any steroids in his system 
when getting her pregnant. Hogan admitted he would have his steroids sent to other people, in specific 
high school pal Dan Brower. When asked if he had ever discussed with Titan who would pay for his charter 
flights, he said "No" and Brevetti pulled out the letter from April 11, 1989 that Feinburg typed. He said he 
didn't recall it. He said he didn't have a specific recollection of picking up steroids in April 1989 at the Titan 
offices. He had no recollection of Jim Stuart delivering steroids to him at an arena. He said any orders 
placed with Zahorian would have been for his personal use and that he didn't distribute steroids. He said he 
thought use was legal with a prescription. He admitted getting steroids from a Dr. Lebowitz in New York 
and a Dr. War in Canada as well as Zahorian. They also brought up Dr. (Bob) Paunovich in Denver, a close 
personal friend, and Hogan claimed he didn't remember getting steroids from him, but then recollected 
getting deca with a prescription. He tried to use steroids in a legal means but also bought steroids in gyms 
in the 70s and early 80s. He started using doctors when he worked for the AWA and New Japan because it 
was better from doctors because you'd avoid black market fakes (actually Brevetti said all this, Hogan just 
responded "That's fair" to all her comments). She then said that he knew more about steroids in 1994 than 
he did in the 80s and that the medical community knows more in 1994 than they did in the 80s and he said 
"Yes, there's more information," trying once again to make the dishonest defense that back during this time 
frame we didn't know the dangers. When asked if he knew then what he knows now might he never have 
used steroids, he said "That might be the case." Hogan denied it when she categorized him as a private 
person. She brought out a color photo that made numerous newspapers throughout the years of McMahon, 
Hogan and Zahorian and said it wasn't taken when the three were in a discussion about steroids. "Were 
you ever in a room with Vince McMahon, yourself and Zahorian talking about steroids?" "No, not in a 
room." (O'Shea never picked up the opening here). He said McMahon never ordered him to use steroids 
and that it was his decision. When asked if other wrestlers that used steroids were also making personal 
decisions, he said, "From my knowledge, yes." He was never personally aware of McMahon telling or 
implying any wrestlers should use steroids. He never heard any agent say, the doctor is here, do you need 
an advance. He said rigs were a term for needles, not for steroids and needles (although Feinberg own 
code words needn't be the same as Hogan's). He said he's heard the term roid rage, but in all the years he 
used steroids, never experienced it, nor did he ever know of McMahon experiencing roid rage. 

She tried to make the point that wrestlers are naturally aggressive, boisterous, but Hogan wouldn't concede 
the point, but finally admitted some might be at some times, but said he never made a connection between 
that and steroids. He said the term larger-than-life referred to the character and not physical size. He said 
Titan never paid for steroids for wrestlers nor did he ever see a road agent or employee distribute steroids. 
Between 1985-91, he said if needed, you could find other sources of steroids then Zahorian and when she 
said Titan had nothing to do with providing you the services of Zahorian, he said, "That would be very fair." 
He didn't recall having steroids delivered to Brower's house but if they were, they would have been his 
steroids. He said he introduced Brower, who also used steroids, to Zahorian, but admitted they'd loan each 
other steroids and repay each other later with steroids, but that he didn't consider this distribution. 
However, in the Grand Jury, he testified Zahorian sent packages to Brower for him. He said during this time 
period he thought doctors had the legal right to dispense steroids and that he didn't have any knowledge 
what Zahorian was doing was criminal and he believed those at Titan thought the same thing. He agreed 
dealing in Hershey was a private transaction between a wrestler and a doctor, and admitted discussing 
medical problems of himself and his wife's with Zahorian that were apart from his steroid use and used his 
medical advice on that subject (nature of which was never established). He said McMahon never sent him 
steroids by fed-ex that McMahon had gotten from Zahorian, and that the packages he picked up in the 


office were packages he ordered himself by calling Emily, and said McMahon didn't direct Feinberg to do 
this for him but that he called Emily himself. He said he picked the steroids up from Emily personally, he 
never remembered McMahon handing him steroids and he didn't recall Stuart ever delivering him a package 
of steroids. If he got steroids from other wrestlers, he'd eventually repay them with steroids. He said Vince 
was his close friend and that in 1988 in Atlanta, McMahon used Hogan's deca and anavar and Hogan 
discussed cycling with him, how often to use, etc. "At some point during that period bottles may have been 
given to you in exchange (by McMahon)?" "Possible." He said he talked with Zahorian about the safety of 
various steroids and that Zahorian told him decadurabolin and anavar were the safest and that deca was as 
safe as sugar going through your system and he relied on that opinion. He believed steroids helped speed 
healing of injuries. He was surprised when Zahorian was investigated and was told not to talk with him but 
he still tried to talk with him. In 1991, he claimed he felt singled out because the public didn't know 
anything about steroids and out of thousands of users, he felt it was unfair. He admitted since that time 
that steroids have been brought up in 85% of his press interviews. He admitted during that period saying 
things that weren't true regarding his steroid use, including on the Arsenio Hall show. He said before doing 
the Hall show, McMahon told him he didn't think it was a good idea to go on the show. He said he didn't 
not tell the truth to defraud a government agency or to obstruct justice. He personally didn't feel he 
committed any crimes. He said he came back to the WWF in 1993 for money and for personal exposure to 
help him in his acting career and said he and McMahon were still friends, although during the entire time in 
the court room, the two never made eye contact. 
this for him but that he called Emily himself. He said he picked the steroids up from Emily personally, he 
never remembered McMahon handing him steroids and he didn't recall Stuart ever delivering him a package 
of steroids. If he got steroids from other wrestlers, he'd eventually repay them with steroids. He said Vince 
was his close friend and that in 1988 in Atlanta, McMahon used Hogan's deca and anavar and Hogan 
discussed cycling with him, how often to use, etc. "At some point during that period bottles may have been 
given to you in exchange (by McMahon)?" "Possible." He said he talked with Zahorian about the safety of 
various steroids and that Zahorian told him decadurabolin and anavar were the safest and that deca was as 
safe as sugar going through your system and he relied on that opinion. He believed steroids helped speed 
healing of injuries. He was surprised when Zahorian was investigated and was told not to talk with him but 
he still tried to talk with him. In 1991, he claimed he felt singled out because the public didn't know 
anything about steroids and out of thousands of users, he felt it was unfair. He admitted since that time 
that steroids have been brought up in 85% of his press interviews. He admitted during that period saying 
things that weren't true regarding his steroid use, including on the Arsenio Hall show. He said before doing 
the Hall show, McMahon told him he didn't think it was a good idea to go on the show. He said he didn't 
not tell the truth to defraud a government agency or to obstruct justice. He personally didn't feel he 
committed any crimes. He said he came back to the WWF in 1993 for money and for personal exposure to 
help him in his acting career and said he and McMahon were still friends, although during the entire time in 
the court room, the two never made eye contact. 

O'Shea came back, trying to salvage something and definitely unhappy with the way things went, asking, 
"Was Emily Feinberg or Vince McMahon a doctor?" "No." "But you got steroids from both?" "Yes." O'Shea 
established it was a big part of his appeal was his size and muscularity, and when asking if that size came 
from steroids Hogan said, "In the past." "Like your 22-inch arms?" "Yes, thereabouts." "You got to be Hulk 
Hogan in part because of steroids?" "In part." Hogan testified that Zahorian actually gave him an entire 
white prescription pad with every page filled with writing decadurabolin for Terry Bollea for bodybuilding 
purposes to cover himself if they found steroids on him. Judge Mishler seemed aghast at this breach of 
medical ethics. Zahorian never limited Hogan as to quantity. O'Shea brought up he couldn't do that with his 
family doctor. "When you gave steroids to McMahon, were you a doctor?" "No." He never told Zahorian to 
destroy records of his dealings with him. 

Brevetti finished up saying that even off steroids, Hogan still talks about "22-inch" pythons in his interviews. 

There was tons of media there for Hogan, with every area newspaper running critical stories of him and a 
negative AP story ran in numerous papers around the country. Virtually all media reported this as the first 
time Hogan had admitted steroid use for anything other then injuries, which is patently false because Hogan 
has admitted it while beating around the bush on the subject for the past 18 months every time the subject 
came up in the media. It wouldn't be so bad, since the Arsenio piece is more well-known than any of the 
pieces he's been, well, less deceitful, except that it was brought up afterwards to many that he's been 
admitting use from the late 70s and throughout the 80s for more than one year, but that fact was largely 
ignored everywhere because it would hurt the selling point of the story. One reporter pulled out a roll of 
paper towels that measured 22 inches in circumference since that's the arm size of Hogan that came up in 
court. The circumference of the towels looked to be tons larger than Hogan's arm, which the reporter noted 
was obvious his arms were nowhere near that size, even when covered up in a suit. From most reports, to 
the media, it was Hogan, and not McMahon, who was the one on trial, although I'd say in much of the New 
York media, that perception wasn't the case. Two stations ran Hogan's testimony as the top story on their 
late-night news, and all featured it prominently despite it being a huge news day both locally and 
nationally. CNN Headline News and ESPN covered it nationally, but it didn't make the network newscasts 
and probably only received minimal coverage on the local newscasts outside the New York market. 

*********************************************************** 

Robert Gorse, an office manager for Rugby-Darby Pharmaceuticals in Rockville Centre, NY was next. He 
testified Zahorian ordered $2,403 of steroids in 1988 and $10,132 in 1989 (which he then re-sold for about 
six times what he paid for them). They established the decadurabolin which the police confiscated from 
Dunn and which Feinberg had in her possession was sent to Zahorian from Rockville Centre on August 30, 
1989. McDevitt tried to blame Rugby-Darby for not doing its jobs in monitoring that Zahorian's steroid 


purchases increases more than four-fold the year after distribution for anything but treatment of disease 
became a felony. became a felony. 

*********************************************************** 

John Minton (Big John Studd) was next. There was a lot of discussion about this for days. Minton said that 
because of his recent chemotherapy treatments for Hodgkin's Disease and his suffering a staph infection in 
his chest from it that required surgery, that his doctor told him he couldn't travel, so they were going to do 
his testimony by telephone. Titan's attorneys and McMahon were furious, seemingly believing it was a 
work. McMahon himself, who was quiet virtually the entire trial, said he wanted to know the doctors' name 
and wanted the doctor called to verify. The judge couldn't understand why McMahon was acting like this, 
obviously not understanding the nature of wrestlers. After much defense protesting, Minton was allowed to 
testify, although after insistence from the Titan side, nobody would be allowed to discuss why he was 
testifying by telephone rather than in person as since Minton was going to admit to buying steroids from 
Zahorian. If he said with the jury present that he had Hodgkin's Disease, based on side effects they 
expected would come out later in the trial, combined with his admission of using steroids, they were afraid 
the jury may make a connection to his steroid use with his disease which would prejudice the case against 
McMahon. 

Minton admitted buying steroids from Zahorian and mentioned the same conversation Zahorian testified to 
having, saying Zahorian had told him about it. Studd testified it was in Allentown when they were doing 
television there (which would mean 1984ish rather than 1988 has Zahorian gave the time frame for the 
conversation). Basically his recollection is Zahorian told McMahon that if they didn't buy steroids from him, 
they'd be going to the black market and they're better off getting it from him. "Did you discuss whether 
Vince McMahon approved of what he was doing?" "I don't remember." "Did he distribute steroids after the 
conversation?" "I believe so." Minton said he never talked about steroids with McMahon, and in fact he 
never discussed anything but his own wrestling business with McMahon. He said he didn't regard what 
Zahorian was doing as a crime. He admitted filing a lawsuit on June 27, 1994 against Titan. "Did you know 
it was wrong?" "It wasn't a crime to me. In those days if you got them from a doctor it was okay." He said 
he believed Zahorian was doing both himself and the wrestlers a great service. "During that period of time, 
steroids were a very important part of our regiment. It was a service. I've never seen steroids forced on 
anyone. It was of my own free will. I thought it helped me to maintain my performance level." 

*********************************************************** 

The final witness in the case was Dr. Gary Wadler. His testimony centered around the potential dangers of 
steroids and that prescription use of steroids pre-1988 he felt meant more than just writing a piece of 
paper, it meant doing tests, follow-up work, lab work, etc. on a patient and strongly said what Zahorian 
was doing even though he was a doctor was not within the framework of a doctor/patient relationship. 
Wadler, who wrote the book "Drugs in Athletics," had a list of credentials including 8 years as Chairman of 
the Medical Records committee at Cornell, a member of the board of the Journal of Strength and 
Conditioning, a representative of the World Health Organization on the subject of drugs in sports and was 
awarded in 1993 a citation from the International Olympic Committee for his work on drug abuse in sports. 

McDevitt brought up a whole rolling cabinet file labeled "Wadler Cross-Ex" and a war ensued. Almost none 
of this had any relevance to wrestling and really almost none had any relevance to this case either. 
McDevitt, who showed major league disdain for Wadler, was just wanting to cross him up by taking points 
in his book out of context, taking that 1% of documentation regarding steroid use in the medical journals 
talking about usage not being so dangerous and bringing up even more irrelevant points. If any of this had 
a stake in the outcome of the case, it would be just as sad as if the testimony of Wacholz did. Wadler, for 
his part, had grown almost as disdainful of McDevitt watching the case and was reluctant to concede points 
to McDevitt even when he was obviously correct. 

But while Wadler was an expert on steroids, he was not an expert witness, and there is a difference. 
McDevitt did get him on points that were irrelevant and Wadler at times was shaken. Main points were 
McDevitt tried to say that the side effects Wadler testified to from steroid wasn't done on studies of healthy 
athletes. Wadler pointed out in clinical doses, which are much smaller doses than athletes take, steroids 


have been known to cause serious side effects. No studies have been done using doses athletes use 
because any university doing so would be considered unethical due to the risks involved of the patients. 
McDevitt took that as absence of evidence of side effects on healthy athletes. Wadler pointed out there was 
plenty of anecdotal evidence of that even though there have been no experiments on the subject but 
McDevitt tried to say anecdotal evidence doesn't mean anything and Wadler strongly disagreed. 
because any university doing so would be considered unethical due to the risks involved of the patients. 
McDevitt took that as absence of evidence of side effects on healthy athletes. Wadler pointed out there was 
plenty of anecdotal evidence of that even though there have been no experiments on the subject but 
McDevitt tried to say anecdotal evidence doesn't mean anything and Wadler strongly disagreed. 

Wadler testified that steroids were considered too dangerous for athletic enhancement by the medical 
community dating back to the late 60s (throwing out the "we didn't know the dangers at that time" 
argument out the window) and said there is almost unanimity in the belief in medical circles. He pointed out 
that when used in therapeutic doses, or those much smaller than used by athletes, it has led to numerous 
adverse effects including liver abnormalities, development of cysts that can rupture, benign and cancerous 
liver tumors, prostate changes, malignant kidney tumors, raises cholesterol, heightens risk of vascular 
disease, increases risk of tendon injuries, blood clots, testicular shrinkage which can be of a profound 
nature, diminished sperm production, swollen nipples and there is evidence of dependency and addiction. 
He said anabolic steroids are not proper to prescribe for injuries because they don't have anti-inflammatory 
properties and they increase the risk of tendon injuries. "In my opinion, Dr. Zahorian was not functioning as 
a doctor. There is no evidence he was dispensing steroids for treatment of disease." He said his practice of 
sending steroids fed-ex is contrary to the practice of medicine. Since after 1988, distribution for other than 
the treatment of disease was illegal, O'Shea made the big point--"Dr. Wadler, is bodybuilding (the "disease" 
listed on the Bollea prescription pad for his deca) a disease?" "No." Wadler said side effects of steroids 
were well-known well before 1985. 

McDevitt then went into a history of the steroid dianabol, which was fun for me to listen to since I've read 
the same books, but had no relevance to the case since Zahorian didn't distribute dianabol to wrestlers 
after 1985 (the drug was taken off the market in 1984). Dianabol was in fact made to increase strength. 
Dr. John Ziegler, a doctor for the U.S. Olympic weightlifting team found out when the Russians kicked our 
asses in the 1956 Olympics that they were giving their lifters testosterone as a training aid. While this 
hadn't been done in the U.S., evidence suggests this was developed in the late 30s in Nazi Germany, given 
to soldiers to make them more aggressive. Ziegler felt testosterone had too many side effects so tried to 
develop a drug which would increase power while minimizing side effects, but wasn't successful in that 
goal, but wound up creating the steroid dianabol with Ciba Laboratories, which was used by athletes in 
numerous sports by the early and mid-60s. McDevitt and Brevetti, using that, stated over and over how 
steroids were originally created to increase size and strength, not for treatment of disease, but that only 
applied to dianabol and not the others and dianabol has nothing to do with steroid distribution after 1984. 
Wadler apparently wasn't aware dianabol was originally marketed in the early 60s for safe weight gain, and 
McDevitt spent an eternity emphasizing that point, which really isn't relevant because Wadler never claimed 
to be a steroid historian, just a physician. The flaw in the ointment is that by 1970 due to side effects 
dianabol was made a prescription drug and in 1984 production of it was stopped completely. 

Another of McDevitt's points was that labs were producing and selling far more steroids, even as late as 
1989, then could ever be used for its limited specified medical uses. His point, and a valid one, was that 
the drug companies, the FDA, etc. were all knowingly producing drugs in quantities that they realized they 
were being used by athletes for performance enhancement. He produced an American Medical Association 
journal article that said how steroids could be provided legally for athletic performance enhancement, 
although overstated the article trying to intimate it was an AMA viewpoint rather than simply a statement 
made by an author of an article. He established a physician has the right to prescribe drugs for purposes 
other than its specified indications, trying to defend what Zahorian was doing in dispensing steroids. Wadler 
was hesitant but finally agreed, but still said you needed a doctor/patient relationship and monitoring of the 
patient, things Zahorian didn't do in virtually all cases. He also found a 1982 FDA drug bulletin talking about 
use of prescription drugs for their not-indicated uses and how it was lawful, but again even that bulletin 
indicated needing a doctor/patient relationship. McDevitt did make a point in establishing that there are 
physicians who believe anabolic steroids helps in healing injuries. He brought up the credibility gap because 
the package insert in steroids states these drugs do not enhance athletic performance, when it is 
acknowledged they do, trying to use the athletes argument that since that was a lie, perhaps the side 
effects are also. Wadler was very slow in conceding with this basic point that steroids can increase 
muscular size and strength, going only so far as to say studies have shown that in conjunction with a high 
protein diet and weight training they may enhance strength and muscle size. McDevitt brought up there 


have been more reports of adverse side effects since 1989, indicating this information the drugs could be 
dangerous is a recent discovery, but Wadler made a strong comeback saying by the mid-80s this was all 
well-known. McDevitt pointed out in Wadler's own book published in 1989, he didn't even list the 1988 law 
change, but that was a bogus point since the book went to press in 1988 before that law was on the 
books. McDevitt then blamed Wadler and his publishers for having a book on the market (since his book is 
still on the market and hasn't been updated) with dated and inaccurate information. McDevitt brought up 
that in Wadler's own book he mentioned a study saying that steroids in conjunction with a high protein diet 
and weight training may bring faster gains and took that statement out of context and tried to say Wadler's 
book itself advocated steroid use. McDevitt established Wadler earned $8,700 as the government's express 
witness in the Zahorian case, $38,450 in the Walter Jekot case (a very prominent Los Angeles doctor who 
prescribed steroids to track stars, actors, bodybuilders, football players and other Olympic athletes who is 
now serving a five-year prison term after his conviction) and would earn about $10,500 for his work in this, 
the government's third high profile steroid case. McDevitt tried to establish a conflict of interest and 
motives because Wadler was asked to be an expert witness in Billy Graham's lawsuit against Titan, but that 
point was unfair since Wadler had not even agreed to do so, he had only been asked. McDevitt pointed out 
the American College of Sports Medicine, which Wadler cited as a group against using steroids for athletic 
performance because of side effects, that their position papers are not regarded as legally binding, they are 
just position papers, when Wadler pointed out back in 1984 they put out their first position paper saying the 
side effects are too great for these drugs to be used for athletic performance. McDevitt tried to push that 
the reason these drugs have been banned in many sports is because they give a competitive advantage and 
not because of side effects, but that argument is flawed because if they just were competitively 
advantageous without side effects, it would be just like weight training and no sport has a moral or ethical 
problem with athletes weight training. He again tried to imply that McMahon was simply relying on 
Zahorian's opinion and as a layperson he wouldn't have known better and would have trusted the doctor. 
dangerous is a recent discovery, but Wadler made a strong comeback saying by the mid-80s this was all 
well-known. McDevitt pointed out in Wadler's own book published in 1989, he didn't even list the 1988 law 
change, but that was a bogus point since the book went to press in 1988 before that law was on the 
books. McDevitt then blamed Wadler and his publishers for having a book on the market (since his book is 
still on the market and hasn't been updated) with dated and inaccurate information. McDevitt brought up 
that in Wadler's own book he mentioned a study saying that steroids in conjunction with a high protein diet 
and weight training may bring faster gains and took that statement out of context and tried to say Wadler's 
book itself advocated steroid use. McDevitt established Wadler earned $8,700 as the government's express 
witness in the Zahorian case, $38,450 in the Walter Jekot case (a very prominent Los Angeles doctor who 
prescribed steroids to track stars, actors, bodybuilders, football players and other Olympic athletes who is 
now serving a five-year prison term after his conviction) and would earn about $10,500 for his work in this, 
the government's third high profile steroid case. McDevitt tried to establish a conflict of interest and 
motives because Wadler was asked to be an expert witness in Billy Graham's lawsuit against Titan, but that 
point was unfair since Wadler had not even agreed to do so, he had only been asked. McDevitt pointed out 
the American College of Sports Medicine, which Wadler cited as a group against using steroids for athletic 
performance because of side effects, that their position papers are not regarded as legally binding, they are 
just position papers, when Wadler pointed out back in 1984 they put out their first position paper saying the 
side effects are too great for these drugs to be used for athletic performance. McDevitt tried to push that 
the reason these drugs have been banned in many sports is because they give a competitive advantage and 
not because of side effects, but that argument is flawed because if they just were competitively 
advantageous without side effects, it would be just like weight training and no sport has a moral or ethical 
problem with athletes weight training. He again tried to imply that McMahon was simply relying on 
Zahorian's opinion and as a layperson he wouldn't have known better and would have trusted the doctor. 

Brevetti continued the same argument saying that doctors may learn things from published papers but a 
layperson like McMahon wouldn't know them, that we know more now than five years ago and again tried 
to bring home the point on that there was a lack of knowledge steroids could be harmful during the years 
this was going on. This could have been a risky approach because if only one juror was a major sports fan, 
they'd have known problems associated with use were widely talked about by the late 70s and certainly by 
1982 during the Pan Am games crisis which was a huge sports story at the time, and that this was an 
intellectually dishonest argument. Brevetti tried to make an analogy with breast implants, but the judge 
stopped her, and then brought up it was a great problem with athletes taking fake steroids. 

O'Shea then countered with an FDA paper from 1987 which noted adverse effects were common with those 
who used steroids and talked of increased aggression anti-social behavior by those on significant doses. 

McDevitt and Wadler got into an argument with Wadler saying that the patient doesn't go to the doctor and 
tell him what drugs he needs and in what quantity, that is drug dealing and not acting as a doctor. 
McDevitt then brought up one can buy over-the-counter drugs in as large a quantity as one wanted, and 
Wadler was reluctant to even concede that most basic point. McDevitt pointed out nowhere is there 
literature that a layperson would know that would state the correct course of action in monitoring patients 
while on steroid cycles, arguing that how would a layperson know what to look for to know a doctor isn't 
acting in a legal manner when dispensing steroids. McDevitt pointed out that when anavar was on the 
market, one of its medical uses was for weight gain in patients after weight loss from extensive surgery, 
trying to use that to say that made it okay for athletes to use it to gain weight if they'd give it to surgery 
patients. They spent seemingly forever going back-and-forth about when anavar was removed from the 
market with McDevitt implying a notice several doctors made in March 1988 recalled anavar although the 
notice was actually a position paper to recall the drug and the drug wasn't recalled until more than a year 
later, however Wadler himself also believed the drug was recalled in 1988. 

*********************************************************** 

At this point the jury was excused and the defense argued to drop the charges before going to the jury. 
Although O'Shea put up a valiant front, he was getting killed in the arguments on the distribution counts 
and the judge admonished him saying he was supposed to tie the case into the Eastern District which he 
failed to do, coming up only with the venue by saying the decadurabolin Zahorian had sent to Titan was 


shipped originally from Rockville Centre. McDevitt argued it was shipped months earlier so it wasn't like 
when Titan called Zahorian, he then called Rugby-Darby, but that he simply got his supply from Rugby-
Darby and dispensed what he had on hand to Titan, and also noted the weakness of the testimony. O'Shea 
relied on Feinberg's notebook to prove the distributions, but it was clear he was losing this argument. The 
tables turned when they started arguing conspiracy, as O'Shea easily got the better of the Titan lawyers 
which actually made it seem he had a decent chance in winning the case. The judge denied Titan's motion 
to throw out the conspiracy charge and the judge said there was enough evidence presented to support a 
guilty verdict, and said he'd take under advisement throwing out the distribution charges, which he did on 
7/18. 
when Titan called Zahorian, he then called Rugby-Darby, but that he simply got his supply from Rugby-
Darby and dispensed what he had on hand to Titan, and also noted the weakness of the testimony. O'Shea 
relied on Feinberg's notebook to prove the distributions, but it was clear he was losing this argument. The 
tables turned when they started arguing conspiracy, as O'Shea easily got the better of the Titan lawyers 
which actually made it seem he had a decent chance in winning the case. The judge denied Titan's motion 
to throw out the conspiracy charge and the judge said there was enough evidence presented to support a 
guilty verdict, and said he'd take under advisement throwing out the distribution charges, which he did on 
7/18. 

The case may have hinged on the judges interpretation of the law to the jury, and both sides argued 
vehemently on 7/19 for wording in their favor. O'Shea noted a 1994 case where the court held the 
prosecution need not show the defendants knew all about the conspiracy as long as they knew the general 
nature and extent and a conviction must be upheld if the defendants knowingly participated. The Judge 
said the government must prove a conspiracy was FORMED to distribute steroids without a prescription and 
the defendants willingly and knowingly understood dealing in steroids without a prescription was unlawful. 
If an illegal act furthers the economic purpose of the defendant, that by itself does not make a defendant 
guilty of conspiracy. The defendant must participate with knowledge and with the intention of aiding the 
accomplice. The Titan lawyers ultimately won the case based on the wording of the charge, since the 
government needed the judge to give the jury a broad definition of conspiracy. 

*********************************************************** 

Closing arguments came on 7/20 and O'Shea nearly pulled out the case, using a lot of powerful rhetoric to 
make up for the somewhat weak case. He called the WWF a business with a dark, corrupt underbelly that 
used dangerous drugs to pump up profits, that they provided drugs to their biggest superstar and were 
hiding behind the white coat of Zahorian. He said now they blame Anita Scales, who was just trying to stop 
Zahorian; and Emily Feinberg, who was just following orders. He said they played a game of see-no-evil, 
hear-no-evil when it came to Zahorian's activities and blame everyone and everything except themselves. 
"We're not talking about the paltry profit Zahorian made, we're talking about the millions of profits they 
made. Don't let them say they got no money from Zahorian's drug sales." He said McMahon instructed 
Emily to give the drugs to Terry Bollea, his top star but the law says the drugs can only be distributed in a 
doctor/patient relationship for treatment of a disease and Vince McMahon isn't a doctor and Terry Bollea 
didn't have a disease. He called McMahon a corporate drug pusher while admitting some of the recipients 
may have wanted the drugs themselves and said every drug user has an excuse for using drugs but that 
doesn't mean it's right to distribute the drugs to them. The personal choice argument doesn't hold water 
because the wrestlers did it because they wanted more money and a job. Patterson knew about it in 1985, 
agents Skaaland and Strongbow knew about because they purchased these drugs for their sons. He said 
Jack Lanza told Tom Zenk, "Do you need cash. The doctors here. The doctor has anything you want." Anita 
Scales heard Zahorian was bad news. People told Anita Scales that Zahorian was opening up shop. Jay 
Strongbow told her the boys need their candies. When was the last time your doctor sent you pounds of 
drugs? He said Pat was squirming on the stand, pointing out he said he never used terms like gas and juice 
while Feinberg testified he used those terms to her about 20 times. He said Zahorian saying if it's not from 
me, the boys will go to the black market is no defense. He should have told Zahorian to stop. Get out of 
here and don't come back. They know it's no excuse. They kept him on the stand for three days and 
claimed the government put him up to it. You saw Zahorian was credible. Dr. Wadler told you Zahorian was 
a drug dealer in a white coat. Like any other drug, an addict doesn't get better. An addict keeps using. 
Even Zahorian admits he did wrong. He was a fan. They knew it. They facilitated it. The wrestlers decided 
how much they would get. He was at 50 events giving drugs to wrestlers and sending them in fed-ex 
packages. O'Shea zinged Titan's defense team for on one hand portraying Zahorian as a doctor and on 
another blaming him as a drug dealer. He said when Pat called Zahorian and told him to call back on a pay 
phone, that's what drug dealers do when they're trying to avoid being caught by the police. He said the 
memo, which he built the case around, shows that the three top people in the company, Vince, Linda and 
Patterson are all in it up to their necks and said the memo says Vince ordered the cover up and said Vince 
told Pat through his wife to warn Zahorian about the investigation. When Patterson said it was his idea, it 
was a lie. The memo said Pat & Linda had talked about keeping Zahorian before they knew of the 
investigation. The memo showed they knew it was illegal as their was a passage that read "illegal drugs 


including steroids." Six weeks before sending that memo they tried to get untraceable laundered checks to 
get these drugs to their biggest star. get these drugs to their biggest star. 

They want you to believe Emily Feinberg is the drug dealer. 

The memo shows knowledge of guilt. 

The reason government investigations are kept quiet is to prevent obstruction. 

He portrayed Scales and Sharkey as concerned regular employees who somehow got in the way of a 
conspiracy and how the Titan lawyers tried to imply they were lying. 

Blaming the commission doesn't work because they still tried to use him after the commission closed down. 

Emily Feinberg told you about 6-7 direct distributions to Hulk Hogan. Terry Bollea said it could be as many 
as 10 times. 

It was business as usual. 

And on and on it went. "It's a corporation as drug pushers trying to blame the little guys. 

This hugely successful money machine mixed up chemical cocktails to get wrestlers pumped up and keep 
them going. It's shameful and it's illegal." 

*********************************************************** 

Brevetti, whose looks and delivery are reminiscent of former Roller Games manager Georgia Hase, was 
next. Brevetti was clearly a superstar attorney throughout the case, although in her closing she seemed a 
little down, as almost if the wear-and-tear and three intense weeks in court was starting to take its toll. 
She said it was a dead case and they used Hulk Hogan to breath life into their dead case. She blamed the 
media, saying they singled out Hulk Hogan for using steroids (actually he was singled out only after he 
publicly lied). She presented no strong arguments early, but had tremendous histrionics and was a 
tremendous demonstrative performer. She said the government is asking you to deduce too much from 
what they've presented. They claimed the government is looking for a scapegoat, that there is a problem 
and now they're trying to get this guy because nobody respects wrestling and nobody respects wrestlers. 
Few people will admit they even watch it even though they peek a look. They said it was an investigation to 
find out what happened four to ten years ago and called it "sizzle, but no steak." You'd expect more 
specific dates, conversations and clearer credible recollections. Did they bring anyone to tell us something 
we didn't know? She again implied blame on WCW. Zahorian is a man who lied under oath. Is that 
evidence you want to rely on to send a man to jail? Did Emily Feinberg have a motive to switch from Hulk 
ordering to Vince's involvement. She ripped Randy Culley (Moondog Rex), Zenk, Warlord, Tully Blanchard, 
Rude, Wacholz and Hellwig, saying they all used steroids before and after (actually Wacholz never said that 
at all, and Hellwig never said he used them after). Culley was the only one who admitted buying from 
Zahorian. They all had other sources, doctors, people in gyms. In their investigation, they didn't care about 
where these people got their steroids from or about the ones who are using them now. She said it's 
hypocritical that Zenk and Rude walked out of the court room as free men while admitting under oath they 
recently used steroids while McMahon was on trial. Rude admitted he was on steroids when he testified 
before the Grand Jury but they weren't interested in his sources. Only is cross-examination did we find that 
he's been on-and-off steroids for three years for bodybuilding and to help his joints. When he went to the 
Grand Jury, he was using steroids. He told the government that fact. If they believe Dr. Wadler, Dr. Wadler 
told them it isn't standard practice to use steroids for injuries because they aren't anti-inflammatory. He got 
them from England. The government tells you they can't be used in this way, but Rude walked out of the 
court room a free man. She then ripped Zenk. "Tom Zenk is the type of individual that would take steroids 
out of a garbage can and use them." Zenk never bought steroids from Zahorian and he even called Mrs. 
McMahon up at 2:30 a.m. He walked out on his contract and was in litigation. Vince never told him to use 
steroids. Zenk told us about current steroid use in WCW and nobody cares. Zenk admits using steroids 
three weeks ago, getting the drugs from a gym and he's allowed to walk out of the court room a free man 


and wrestle in Japan for $10,000 while we have to decide Vince McMahon's fate. She brought up Culley has 
a lawsuit. Szopinski was convicted on a steroid charge and as part of probation is supposed to be drug 
tested but after one year hasn't even taken one test. He was never asked by the government who his 
source of steroids was and they never asked him how long it had been since he'd been tested. She called 
Blanchard's testimony "a complete zero." She showed Wacholz' jumpsuit covered his muscles. About 
Wacholz she said: "What do you say about a man who will come to a courtroom and lie." She brought up 
that he have a suit and countersuit out. She noted he said in 1992 Vince told him to get on the gas, like 
McMahon would do that right in the middle of all the bad publicity, and when he was deposed as part of his 
lawsuit, he never mentioned Vince told him to use steroids. She pointed out neither Hellwig or Hogan said 
Vince told them to use steroids and neither testified Vince and Zahorian conspired. She pointed out steroids 
were readily available in gyms and there was steroid use in other promotions. Brevetti tried to give too 
much credibility to Hellwig, because even though he came off as truthful, he admitted to having virtually no 
memory. She said Hogan was the WWF's biggest star, presented as a government witness to prove their 
case and he proved there was no basis for the case. "No witness could breathe life into this dead case." 
She tried to say since Hogan didn't use rigs as a code word for steroids, just needles, that Feinberg 
wouldn't either which doesn't hold water. She practically read Hogan's testimony word-for-word, noting he 
used Zahorian as a doctor, and that Hogan tried to call Zahorian himself and it wasn't to impede an 
investigation. 
a lawsuit. Szopinski was convicted on a steroid charge and as part of probation is supposed to be drug 
tested but after one year hasn't even taken one test. He was never asked by the government who his 
source of steroids was and they never asked him how long it had been since he'd been tested. She called 
Blanchard's testimony "a complete zero." She showed Wacholz' jumpsuit covered his muscles. About 
Wacholz she said: "What do you say about a man who will come to a courtroom and lie." She brought up 
that he have a suit and countersuit out. She noted he said in 1992 Vince told him to get on the gas, like 
McMahon would do that right in the middle of all the bad publicity, and when he was deposed as part of his 
lawsuit, he never mentioned Vince told him to use steroids. She pointed out neither Hellwig or Hogan said 
Vince told them to use steroids and neither testified Vince and Zahorian conspired. She pointed out steroids 
were readily available in gyms and there was steroid use in other promotions. Brevetti tried to give too 
much credibility to Hellwig, because even though he came off as truthful, he admitted to having virtually no 
memory. She said Hogan was the WWF's biggest star, presented as a government witness to prove their 
case and he proved there was no basis for the case. "No witness could breathe life into this dead case." 
She tried to say since Hogan didn't use rigs as a code word for steroids, just needles, that Feinberg 
wouldn't either which doesn't hold water. She practically read Hogan's testimony word-for-word, noting he 
used Zahorian as a doctor, and that Hogan tried to call Zahorian himself and it wasn't to impede an 
investigation. 

Feinberg was said to have gone to the government right after getting her last paycheck. "She's well 
practiced in the art of deception." Brevetti implied Feinberg was an actress and what she did on the stand 
was an act, but if appearing in one video as a model makes her an actress, then what does what all the 
wrestlers did for decades for a living make them? She left the impression Vince had her order steroids for 
Hogan. She testified against the man because she couldn't get another paycheck from him. She said she 
had knowledge of steroids being sent via Jim Stuart. She made it appear Vince asked her to send steroids 
to Hulk Hogan. Brevetti pointed out Feinberg said she did it three times in the Grand Jury but 6-7 in the 
trial and said that as far as method of shipment, that Hogan denied it the next day. She said in the Grand 
Jury she said they sent the drugs with Jim Stuart to a local arena, but when she learned there were no 
local arena shows close to the dates, she brought up fed-exing the packages in the trial. "She makes it up 
out of whole cloth and is presented as a government witness and they hope you don't notice." "Hulk Hogan 
put the lies at the feet of Emily Feinberg." There were no fed-ex receipts and no Jim Stuart--"It's a figment 
of an actresses' imagination." She said Zahorian told a member of the Pennsylvania commission he was 
giving steroids to wrestlers and he remained a state-appointed physician at the matches. No commissioner 
ever reported his activities. She then noted in the first grand jury, Zahorian couldn't remember a 
conversation with Vince, but that when John Minton did, they planted the story in Zahorian's head and 
brought up three different versions of the conversation in three different testimonies (although the wording 
wasn't the same and the third version of the conversation had some of the health concerns taken out, it 
was basically the same conversation he was describing). She said Minton was another wrestler with a 
lawsuit. Actually Brevetti presented a powerful argument about Zahorian's statement changing after Minton 
had testified. 

*********************************************************** 

McDevitt then closed. McDevitt's performance ranged in this case. He was easily the most well-researched 
person, probably in the world, on the nature of this case. He did a great job in presenting his arguments, 
but many of those arguments held little or no water under examination. However, his closing was his finest 
hour in the trial as he gave a stirring speech. 

He said the hypocrisy of the case was violating the law before 1988 because all the agencies that were 
supposed to regulate steroid distribution weren't doing their job (that argument is akin to saying it should 
be okay for someone from Mexico to bring drugs into the United States and sell them if the border control 
officers don't catch them). He tried to imply Wadler didn't know anything about steroids. He argued the 
FDA didn't do anything to regulate steroid use so how could they be defrauded. "The FDA ran from this 
courtroom like Dracula from a cross." He said steroids were made to make athletes bigger and stronger. On 
O'Shea's statements he said, "When you have no evidence, you use empty rhetoric." "Everything you've 
learned in this trial about FDA regulatory aspects of steroids is because we tried to tell you the truth." He 
said the government's allegations of a cover-up was to cover-up that they have no case. He said the 


government couldn't prove a starting point of the conspiracy in 1985. When talking about Vince's personal 
dealings with Zahorian as far as steroids he called it one little conversation, maybe it occurred and maybe 
it didn't. He did a transparently fake sympathizing statement about Anita Scales saying, "We know Anita as 
a part of corporate life. We understand Anita. The facts are nobody told her to hire George Zahorian." All 
she said was Pat came to see her once in August. There was no testimony of another conversation. She 
admits to receiving no order. He said Anita lied about talking to Zahorian because Sharkey said she had the 
conversation (when testimony showed Zahorian made numerous calls to Scales' office). As for the 
conversation with Linda McMahon he said, "You saw her (Scales), you can draw your own conclusions if you 
can be confused talking to Anita." He basically portrayed Scales as a dingbat, but our dingbat that we 
understand. He said the end result is that Zahorian was never hired by Titan after the law changed. 
McDevitt blamed Sharkey's testimony on Scales telling her everything while Hellwig was on the stand 
(Sharkey actually said they talked about some things). He said the so-called untraceable checks were fully 
traceable as them appearing as evidence showed. He said the method of payment doesn't change the 
legality because McMahon wanted things discreet. He said that while Zahorian said Pat told him to destroy 
records, Pat denied it and the memo said nothing about destroying records. The fact was Zahorian 
destroyed no records (although he did hide them out and they weren't there when the government raided 
his office months later) and after being warned of the investigation, Zahorian still sold steroids to wrestlers 
and friends he had met through wrestlers. He said Emily's order to destroy records, if there was one, 
involved her shredding just one cover letter. "As a cover up, this was a lousy cover up. Emily Feinberg 
destroyed nothing. Every single piece of evidence is sitting there." He ripped on Zahorian's treatment 
before going to the Grand Jury saying he'd say anything to get out of that treatment and said Zahorian's 
presence at the matches was required by the state. He said it killed the idea of conspiracy when he was 
asked if he was dispensing steroids without the involvement of the WWF and he said yes and that nobody 
from the WWF ever encouraged him to give steroids to wrestlers to make them bigger. He said Skaaland 
and Strongbow bought steroids for their sons who weren't wrestlers (which is misleading because both sons 
were trying to make it as wrestlers at the time). He said nobody ever told Zahorian to sell steroids and said 
Zahorian talked with Feinberg about payment and Hogan placed the orders and said Zahorian didn't know 
anything about McMahon giving steroids to Hogan. "This conspiracy idea is trying to create a crime when 
there wasn't one." He then blamed Wadler with trying to create hysteria by bring up the side effects from 
steroids saying they had nothing to do with this case. "They have the burden of proof. They didn't prove it. 
They didn't come close." 
dealings with Zahorian as far as steroids he called it one little conversation, maybe it occurred and maybe 
it didn't. He did a transparently fake sympathizing statement about Anita Scales saying, "We know Anita as 
a part of corporate life. We understand Anita. The facts are nobody told her to hire George Zahorian." All 
she said was Pat came to see her once in August. There was no testimony of another conversation. She 
admits to receiving no order. He said Anita lied about talking to Zahorian because Sharkey said she had the 
conversation (when testimony showed Zahorian made numerous calls to Scales' office). As for the 
conversation with Linda McMahon he said, "You saw her (Scales), you can draw your own conclusions if you 
can be confused talking to Anita." He basically portrayed Scales as a dingbat, but our dingbat that we 
understand. He said the end result is that Zahorian was never hired by Titan after the law changed. 
McDevitt blamed Sharkey's testimony on Scales telling her everything while Hellwig was on the stand 
(Sharkey actually said they talked about some things). He said the so-called untraceable checks were fully 
traceable as them appearing as evidence showed. He said the method of payment doesn't change the 
legality because McMahon wanted things discreet. He said that while Zahorian said Pat told him to destroy 
records, Pat denied it and the memo said nothing about destroying records. The fact was Zahorian 
destroyed no records (although he did hide them out and they weren't there when the government raided 
his office months later) and after being warned of the investigation, Zahorian still sold steroids to wrestlers 
and friends he had met through wrestlers. He said Emily's order to destroy records, if there was one, 
involved her shredding just one cover letter. "As a cover up, this was a lousy cover up. Emily Feinberg 
destroyed nothing. Every single piece of evidence is sitting there." He ripped on Zahorian's treatment 
before going to the Grand Jury saying he'd say anything to get out of that treatment and said Zahorian's 
presence at the matches was required by the state. He said it killed the idea of conspiracy when he was 
asked if he was dispensing steroids without the involvement of the WWF and he said yes and that nobody 
from the WWF ever encouraged him to give steroids to wrestlers to make them bigger. He said Skaaland 
and Strongbow bought steroids for their sons who weren't wrestlers (which is misleading because both sons 
were trying to make it as wrestlers at the time). He said nobody ever told Zahorian to sell steroids and said 
Zahorian talked with Feinberg about payment and Hogan placed the orders and said Zahorian didn't know 
anything about McMahon giving steroids to Hogan. "This conspiracy idea is trying to create a crime when 
there wasn't one." He then blamed Wadler with trying to create hysteria by bring up the side effects from 
steroids saying they had nothing to do with this case. "They have the burden of proof. They didn't prove it. 
They didn't come close." 

*********************************************************** 

O'Shea got last licks and topped the other two, although the speech was such a vicious attack that it left 
Linda McMahon fighting back tears. "These points demand an answer. Some are an outrage. Some of what 
they've said about the government are an outrage!" "You're talking about corporate drug dealing." He said 
the memo is all that is needed for the conviction and they're continuing to blame other people for what 
they did. They blamed us for bringing Terry Bollea into this courtroom and packing it. "We didn't sell Terry 
Bollea, eat your vitamins kids, when they were pumping him full of steroids." "He told Emily Feinberg to 
distribute drugs to Hulk Hogan. 

He ordered Doug Sages to get him cash for drugs. He laundered checks. He told Emily Feinberg to destroy 
steroid correspondences." O'Shea blamed McDevitt for bringing in irrelevant documents. "McDevitt tried to 
throw smoke up in the air to divert you from the evidence." The (1988) law said steroids could only be 
dispensed for the treatment of disease. He played a game with Wadler for two days taking things out of 
context. O'Shea said the defense is now claiming every witness has a grudge. "They (Titan) sue someone 
and then they say that person has a grudge." "They say it (the investigation) took too long and it's old. It 
talks a long time to uncover these things." "What is Anita Scales' grudge? What is Emily Feinberg's? Anita 
and Marge Sharkey are two regular folks. McDevitt tried to tell you they're liars." "Ignorance of the law is 
no excuse." "How do we know there aren't more documents?" He noted Hogan said there were up to ten 
distributions to him, Feinberg said six or seven, and they could only find records of two. "They talk about 
bias of witnesses. What about Terry Bollea. He said McMahon was one of his best friends. He said they 
gave him steroids up to ten times." O'Shea said steroid use is still going on in the WWF because Szopinski 
told them in 8/93 he knew there was still use in the WWF. "Because other are violating law, if you're 
violating law, that doesn't make you innocent." "Rick Rude is a user, not a pusher. Vince McMahon is the 
pusher." Now they say why don't you prosecute WCW. "If we get any evidence of WCW supplying its 


wrestlers with steroids we'll be on them like white on rice!" "They don't like it because we got them and the 
evidence has them." "Now they want us to go after users. Anyone but them." If Randy Culley had such a 
grudge against them, why didn't he say Vince McMahon told him to go on steroids. If Tom Zenk had so 
much hatred, why didn't he say that. Then, in a speech reminiscent of Al Pacino in the closing scene of the 
movie "And Justice for All," O'Shea, when bringing up Brevetti's statement that this happened because 
nobody has any respect for wrestling, screamed, You know who doesn't have any respect for wrestling. It's 
the defendant, Vincent McMahon. He treated the wrestlers like (not sure of word he used but akin to cattle, 
ie having them on steroids and not caring although not sure of exact phraseology). He said they only 
contacted Jim Hellwig about steroids when he got caught. "He was happy his champion Jim Hellwig was 
using steroids. Only mad because he got caught." "They said Hogan was our star witness. We had to 
immunize him to get the truth from him." We never tried to create hysteria. They (steroids) were illegal 
then. They're illegal now. They say roid rage doesn't exist (and points to an article in a medical journal on 
the condition). What's Emily Feinberg's grudge? They say she's an actress. She left the company. Now you 
can't leave the company. What's Anita Scales and Marge Sharkey's grudge. Where's their lawsuit. What's 
Doug Sages' grudge when he squirmed around before admitting he got a bucket full of cash for McMahon 
and Hogan. "What boggles the mind is they say everyone is out to get them." Emily Feinberg came here 
from a government subpoena. She did as she was told. She didn't distribute on her own. But they tried to 
put it on her. McMahon gave her the drugs that Bollea picked up. Why is she corroborated up and down by 
Sages? How is Sages telling the truth and Emily Feinberg lying when they said the same thing? "They didn't 
just agree to break the law. They broke the law. 
evidence has them." "Now they want us to go after users. Anyone but them." If Randy Culley had such a 
grudge against them, why didn't he say Vince McMahon told him to go on steroids. If Tom Zenk had so 
much hatred, why didn't he say that. Then, in a speech reminiscent of Al Pacino in the closing scene of the 
movie "And Justice for All," O'Shea, when bringing up Brevetti's statement that this happened because 
nobody has any respect for wrestling, screamed, You know who doesn't have any respect for wrestling. It's 
the defendant, Vincent McMahon. He treated the wrestlers like (not sure of word he used but akin to cattle, 
ie having them on steroids and not caring although not sure of exact phraseology). He said they only 
contacted Jim Hellwig about steroids when he got caught. "He was happy his champion Jim Hellwig was 
using steroids. Only mad because he got caught." "They said Hogan was our star witness. We had to 
immunize him to get the truth from him." We never tried to create hysteria. They (steroids) were illegal 
then. They're illegal now. They say roid rage doesn't exist (and points to an article in a medical journal on 
the condition). What's Emily Feinberg's grudge? They say she's an actress. She left the company. Now you 
can't leave the company. What's Anita Scales and Marge Sharkey's grudge. Where's their lawsuit. What's 
Doug Sages' grudge when he squirmed around before admitting he got a bucket full of cash for McMahon 
and Hogan. "What boggles the mind is they say everyone is out to get them." Emily Feinberg came here 
from a government subpoena. She did as she was told. She didn't distribute on her own. But they tried to 
put it on her. McMahon gave her the drugs that Bollea picked up. Why is she corroborated up and down by 
Sages? How is Sages telling the truth and Emily Feinberg lying when they said the same thing? "They didn't 
just agree to break the law. They broke the law. 

All their tricks didn't help them." They beat up Emily Feinberg but she was corroborated by Sages on one 
side and corroborated by Bollea. She's got a grudge but was corroborated on both ends." When they 
distributed drugs they broke the law. "We're picking on them but you heard of other doctors that have went 
to jail." "If we set them up, did we also write the memo? Why didn't we frame them tighter?" "If you've 
found out the doctor is giving out drugs, you say get out and don't come back. Vince McMahon said come 
back. They said come back." When people called Zahorian sleazy and used terms like setting up shop, you 
don't need to be a doctor to say something wrong was going on. "There's a disease that can't be cured. All 
the wrestlers suffer from it. And nobody ever gets better." "This case isn't about the FDA. 

That's another smoke screen to create confusion." They say Anita is a liar. No motive, she's just a liar. 
Another excuse--they (drug companies) made too many drugs. "It doesn't matter if others are guilty, it 
matters if they are guilty." They blame the FDA. They say the system was at fault. Listen to the law. They 
say, please don't look at what we did or you'll convict us. We all know in our daily life that you can't 
distribute drugs. When they say there's no proof, that's a laugh. 

Which side took sentences out of context to confuse the issue? Dr. Zahorian was never hired, but he was 
authorized back then to distribute drugs. "You can't hide behind a doctor's white coat. You can't obstruct or 
impede an investigation. If you violate the law, you're guilty. I ask based on the evidence to find the 
defendants guilty." 

************************************************************ 

It didn't happen. My opinion on this case in hindsight is when O'Shea said McMahon and/or Titan 
distributed to wrestlers, he used a plural when the only possible evidence of distribution was to a singular, 
Hulk Hogan, and by not tying any evidence into a distribution at the Nassau Coliseum, the case on 
distribution had no business being tried on Long Island because the excuse Rugby-Darby Pharmaceuticals 
was located in Rockville Centre was just too weak. It was a two-plus year investigation and a high-profile 
case that came up empty-handed, although it was not a one-sided clear-cut victory that many who weren't 
in the court room paying attention seem to believe. But it was a weak case, needing a broad definition for 
conspiracy to even have a chance of conviction. All the attorneys performed well at times, but O'Shea failed 
to capitalize at points on key openings and his lack of familiarity to the machinations of the wrestling 
business hurt in court. It's hard to read if McDevitt's tactics of confusing the issue ultimately helped or 
hindered the case. 

Everyone is speculating on what will happen next when it comes to steroids, wrestlers, bad publicity and 
fallout based on this verdict. We'll have to sit back and watch. I have no assumptions on what Titan or 


other companies will do regarding steroids based on this verdict other than I find it difficult to believe 
they'll go back to pushing steroid monsters as others have speculated. Steroid use is very minimal within 
the WWF today although I don't think anyone could say with certainty that it doesn't exist completely, 
although it is almost certainly at a far lower level than either WCW or any other major promotion in the 
world today. Use exists everywhere else as well, although nowhere at the levels it did before the Zahorian 
trial. During the same period, the business in this country took one of its biggest economic hits in history. 
Was the bad publicity and the marked drop-off in popularity just a coincidence of time or were they related 
to one another? In the long run, was all this good for the wrestling industry? And if it wasn't, should that 
be a concern if the news the created the negative publicity that came out as all is said and done and 
testified to largely turned out to be factual? In the long run, was it good for the health and well being of 
the wrestlers? You be the judge. 
they'll go back to pushing steroid monsters as others have speculated. Steroid use is very minimal within 
the WWF today although I don't think anyone could say with certainty that it doesn't exist completely, 
although it is almost certainly at a far lower level than either WCW or any other major promotion in the 
world today. Use exists everywhere else as well, although nowhere at the levels it did before the Zahorian 
trial. During the same period, the business in this country took one of its biggest economic hits in history. 
Was the bad publicity and the marked drop-off in popularity just a coincidence of time or were they related 
to one another? In the long run, was all this good for the wrestling industry? And if it wasn't, should that 
be a concern if the news the created the negative publicity that came out as all is said and done and 
testified to largely turned out to be factual? In the long run, was it good for the health and well being of 
the wrestlers? You be the judge. 

*********************************************************** 

BASH AT THE BEACH FINAL POLL RESULTS 

Thumbs up 147 (46.7%) 

Thumbs down 91 (28.9%) 

In the middle 77 (24.4%) 

BEST MATCH POLL 

Ric Flair vs. Hulk Hogan 107 

Rick Steamboat vs. Steve Austin 102 

Steve Regal vs. Johnny B. Badd 9 

WORST MATCH POLL 

Cactus Jack & Kevin Sullivan vs. Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff 121 

Steve Regal vs. Johnny B. Badd 46 

Vader vs. Guardian Angel 37 

Ric Flair vs. Hulk Hogan 25 

Based on phone calls, letters and fax messages to the Observer as of Tuesday, 7/26. Statistical margin of 
error: +-100%. 

Make no mistake about it. Bash at the Beach was a huge success. I don't think it was close to the best PPV 
show WCW has put on of late, but it accomplished what it needed to and at least as far as the first show 
went, the Hogan signing was a success. The Bash drew an estimated 1.02 percent buy rate, the biggest 
WCW buy rate since 1991, or slightly more than double that of Slamboree. That would mean it was ordered 
in about 230,000 homes with a WCW PPV gross of $2.58 million. Hogan's approximate cut between the PPV 
and the live gate would be $680,000, which isn't bad for one night's work, especially when his opponent 
did most of the work in the ring. Hogan deserves credit for doing a great job going coast-to-coast, getting 
on network talk shows, and calling in his markers for the celebrity tie-in for last-minute hype. As far as 
actual profit goes, if we go under the assumption that a typical PPV needs $800,000 as a break even mark, 
the last WCW PPV show did about a $400,000 profit. Starrcade with Flair-Vader probably did about a 
$700,000 profit (that's on the show, WCW and THE split the money and who knows what actually comes 
down as company profit other than it isn't nearly enough to wipe out the millions in losses). Throwing in 
Hogan's share, the extra money spent in advertising and expenses of the like, this show probably did about 
$550,000 in profit, or more than a typical show but even with the larger audience and the company's 
largest PPV gross ever, the profit probably wasn't as much as two of the shows in the last seven months. If 


Hogan can maintain it at this level for the next two shows, his signing is a success. Last year when he came 
back with Titan, the audience was cut almost in half on his second PPV (which was a Wrestlemania vs. a 
King of the Ring so there are other major factors involved) and if anything drops them below 0.85s the next 
two shows, this still won't be short-term successful. Long-term the idea is Hogan will expose the product to 
new fans with the bigger audience resulting in a bigger base, but those things sound good on paper and in 
practice almost never materialize. It was the first time in history that a WCW PPV show outdrew a WWF 
one during the same period, and we're talking by 30% The show also drew about 14,000 fans to the 
Orlando Arena, of which 9,111 were paid with a gate in the neighborhood of $140,000, which would be the 
largest crowd and gate for a WCW card since 1989 during the Ric Flair-Terry Funk feud. The reason was 
clear, it was the appearance and promotional work during the last week of Hogan, because the card did not 
have a strong undercard. The problem live was that the crowd was there to see Hogan, and to a lesser 
extent Flair, and the heat underneath was subpar, even when the work itself was strong, particularly in the 
Rick Steamboat-Steve Austin match. 
back with Titan, the audience was cut almost in half on his second PPV (which was a Wrestlemania vs. a 
King of the Ring so there are other major factors involved) and if anything drops them below 0.85s the next 
two shows, this still won't be short-term successful. Long-term the idea is Hogan will expose the product to 
new fans with the bigger audience resulting in a bigger base, but those things sound good on paper and in 
practice almost never materialize. It was the first time in history that a WCW PPV show outdrew a WWF 
one during the same period, and we're talking by 30% The show also drew about 14,000 fans to the 
Orlando Arena, of which 9,111 were paid with a gate in the neighborhood of $140,000, which would be the 
largest crowd and gate for a WCW card since 1989 during the Ric Flair-Terry Funk feud. The reason was 
clear, it was the appearance and promotional work during the last week of Hogan, because the card did not 
have a strong undercard. The problem live was that the crowd was there to see Hogan, and to a lesser 
extent Flair, and the heat underneath was subpar, even when the work itself was strong, particularly in the 
Rick Steamboat-Steve Austin match. 

A. Brian & Brad Armstrong beat Steve Keirn & Bobby Eaton in the dark match opener, said to be *1/4. 
1. Steve Regal retained the TV title pinning Johnny B. Badd in 10:40. Regal did a sunset flip holding the 
ropes, the ref kicked Regal's hand off and Badd reversed into his own pin, but Regal reversed that and held 
the tights for the pin. Sting was pulled for the show for a worked injury (which was announced on television 
the weekend before the show) because they wanted to give Regal a clean win at a show when Antonio 
Inoki was there as a favor to Inoki. The match was a good opener. **1/2 
After the match they presented Inoki with a plaque. They put him over strong although most of the fans 
seemed to not know him. Gene Okerlund told everyone to give him a standing ovation, but the best he 
could get was polite applause. Regal came in and said that he knew Inoki had defeated Muhammad Ali 
(actually he laid on his back for 15 rounds against Ali in a shoot) and Andre the Giant but when he was in 
Japan, Inoki was nowhere to be found. Inoki took off his suit jacket and Bill Dundee pulled Regal out of the 
ring. The Inoki deal is a favor to Hogan, since Inoki gave Hogan his first superstar break back in 1980, 
before Hogan reached that level in the United States. 

2. Vader beat Guardian Angel via DQ in 7:58. It wasn't up to Vader's usual standards, but the work was 
pretty stiff. Vader did a moonsault but after landing, sold the move himself instead of pinning Angel. Harley 
Race got to the top rope and Angel threw him off and then threw him out of the ring. Angel suplexed 
Vader in. A ref bump and Race gave Vader a night stick, but Angel got the stick. Before he could use it, the 
ref saw him and called for the DQ. Terrible finish. They didn't want to pin Angel because it was his first 
major match with the new gimmick and obviously after all the job's Vader has done, they didn't want to 
beat him again, but it makes Vader who is a top attraction look weak when he can't even win in the second 
match on the card, and it made no sense since he was scheduled to work on top in a triangular match at 
the next PPV. **1/2 
3. Terry Funk & Bunkhouse Buck beat Dustin Rhodes & Arn Anderson in 11:15. Rhodes worked all but the 
first 30 seconds of the match, doing a good job in getting heat and fighting his way out of trouble. Finally 
he made the tag to Anderson and (with the cameras somewhere else), Anderson immediately DDT'd him 
and put Funk on top for the pin. They did a three-on-one teasing they broke Rhodes' arm until Doug 
Dillenger and Greg Gagne (boy did he get old or what?) made the save. *** 
4. Steve Austin pinned Rick Steamboat in 20:10 to retain the U.S. title. This started slow but turned into a 
super match. Steamboat was the best performer on the card. The crowd got into it in spots but it didn't get 
the heat it should have because so much of the crowd was either papered and there to cheer for Hogan or 
paid just to see Hogan. Either way, they weren't going to get into anything underneath. Highlight was a 
triple reversal in a tombstone piledriver set-up before Steamboat did the move. At one point the ref was 
about to DQ Austin when Steamboat asked for it to continue. Finally Steamboat did a cross bodyblock but 
Austin reversed the move and held the trunks for the pin. ***3/4 
Next came a lengthy interview in the dressing room with the Stud Stable, including Arn Anderson, who 
somehow cryptically talked about his deal with Sid Vicious in England last year. 


5. Pretty Wonderful (Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff) won the WCW tag titles from Cactus Jack & Kevin Sullivan 
in 20:11. Although Paul Orndorff is great at working the crowd, these guys are flat when it comes to being 
tag champs. The match wasn't good, and unless you knew what was going on coming in (with the violence 
ban meaning those matches Cactus Jack had on the previous PPVs are now never going to happen until 
things change), you'd have come out of it terribly disappointed. It wasn't until the last minute that it was 
even clear Cactus would work, as he was still in rough shape from a back injury suffered in the match 
against Sabu. WCW officials were also exceedingly upset about Cactus spitting on the belt and throwing it 
on the ground doing an ECW interview. Brian Pillman was flown in to sub for him, but instead just made a 
cameo appearance at the Hogan victory party along with Brutus Beefcake, Jim Duggan and Brian Blair. 
Match was dull. The crowd was doing the wave and paying no attention to the match. It went on forever. 
Finish saw Jack do the double-arm DDT on Orndorff, but Roma tripped him from outside and with Jack's 
legs way out of the ring and the ref right there seeing Roma hold them, still counted as Orndorff did the 
pin. 1/2* 
6. Hulk Hogan pinned Ric Flair to win the WCW title in 21:50. It was the first clean pinfall ever in a singles 
match between the two of them (in 1992, Hogan pinned Flair with a legdrop in several tag team matches, 
but all the singles matches were either DQ or COR endings). Hogan got an ever bigger pop than Shaquille. 
Three bad points. No George Foreman. Mr. T was there. So was Michael Buffer. The announcers tried to 
get over an insulting storyline to any fan that has even the semblance of a memory that this was Hogan's 
first match in three years and it was the first time Flair and Hogan had ever wrestled. Flair was psyched up 
for the match, even though from a storyline standpoint it was no different than every other Hogan SNME 
match except it was longer. Hogan overpowers heel. Manager distracts Hogan. Heel gets advantage. 
Instead of it happening twice, it happened four times. But the people were there to see the Hogan show 
and Flair gave it to them. Hogan missed a legdrop the first time, but didn't sell a suplex. After a foot-toface, 
Sherri posted ref Randy Anderson (no dq called?). Sherri KO'd Jimmy Hart and Flair clipped Hogan. 
Sherri splashed Hogan off the top. Nick Patrick ran in as the second ref as Flair got the figure four on but 
Hogan made the ropes. Sherri started choking Hogan with her nylons and raked his eyes. Somebody ought 
to give that woman a medal for how hard she works at ringside. Sherri missed a second splash off the top 
rope, Hogan made the superman comeback, Flair took a bump off the top. Hogan put on the figure four. 
Mr. T carried Sherri to the back. Flair hit Hogan with Knux but Hogan kicked out at two. Another superman 
comeback. Legdrop. 1-2-3. ***1/4 
************************************************************ 

WCW's next major show will be the Clash of Champions on 8/24 from Cedar Rapids, IA. The company 
wanted this Clash and the October PPV show (Joe Louis Arena in Detroit) both as far out of the Southeast 
as possible due to the reaction Hogan received in Charleston, SC. The Clash was originally scheduled for St. 
Paul, the first city in the United States where Hogan established himself as a super draw back in 1981, but 
since it would go head-up with the first day of the state fair, it was moved. As to why Cedar Rapids, that I 
can't answer. For TV ratings purposes, it looks like a strong show with the Hogan vs. Flair title match 
headlining, plus Dusty & Dustin Rhodes vs. Bunkhouse Bunk & Terry Funk, Pretty Wonderful defending the 
tag team titles against Nasty Boys (so the turn should take place in the next few weeks), Steve Austin 
defending the U.S. title against Rick Steamboat and Steve Regal vs. Antonio Inoki. One thing positive that 
has to be said about Flair's reign as booker is that unlike his predecessors, he doesn't overbook the major 
shows so everything gets rushed. With five matches, everything should have at least a decent amount of 
time to get it done correctly and on paper it's a strong Clash and you'd think Hogan-Flair on television for 
free should draw a huge rating. The 9/18 Wrestle War PPV from Roanoke, VA will be headlined by a War 
Games with Dusty & Dustin teaming with Nasty Boys vs. Funk & Buck & Meng & Arn Anderson, and it 
appears they'll go with a triangular match with Flair, Sting and Vader as the co-feature. 10/23 will be 
Halloween Havoc headlined by Hogan vs. Flair in a cage match for the title with Mr. T as referee and 
Muhammad Ali appearing on some capacity with Hogan. There has been publicity released that Flair would 
retire if he doesn't regain the title in this match, although my gut feeling is that Flair will win the title with 
tons of outside interference at the Clash, which sets up the cage, where Hogan will once again reign 
supreme, but this is all speculation. Friends of Flair have said Flair may retire as a wrestler at the end of 
this year and concentrate on booking and his gym business interests. There is also serious speculation that 
when Sting's contract expires around January, that he'll try to pursue acting work and unless the money is 
right, may not be around to be the heir apparent Hogan passes the torch to which appears to be the 


current plan. 

*********************************************************** 


AAA wrestling promoted by the IWC returned to the United States this past weekend for debut shows at the 
Rosemont Horizon in Chicago and the Paramount in New York. While the weekend wasn't profitable due to 
the high cost of putting together shows of this type, they once again shocked the wrestling world drawing 
houses just under $100,000 each night and based on what we hear, the shows had hot action and even 
hotter crowds. 

The Chicago card on 7/23 drew 5,200 (4,425 paid) and $97,000, with the crowd being hotter for the show 
than any show in the city in recent memory. The gate was slightly less than WWF did for the Wrestlemania 
Revenge tour ($103,000) and WCW did for Spring Stampede ($107,000) in the same building. The show 
was pretty much a break-even proposition and Ron Skoler, who heads the promotion of these shows was 
overall happy enough to want to return in the near future, but probably at the UIC Pavilion or the 
Ampitheatre because of easier access to the Mexican community in town. The main storyline item of the 
show was Love Machine & Eddy Guerrero capturing the AAA tag titles in their first night back from Japan 
from Octagon & El Hijo del Santo. Main event saw Konnan El Barbaro & Perro Aguayo & Cien Caras beat 
Jake Roberts & La Parka & Psicosis. Actually the Chicago figures if anything were a slight disappointment 
since the prediction a day ahead of time was a $140,000 house, but it does blow to bits the argument that 
AAA would be unable to draw outside of Southern California (actually that argument never held water since 
they drew big houses twice in San Jose, but those making that argument seemed have never looked at a 
map thinking San Jose was in Southern California). The only negative is the crowd was so hot it got violent 
and three police officers were injured in trying to calm things down. 

New York, however, was a surprise. The Paramount show drew 3,300 fans (2,800 paid) and $99,000 
(tickets were priced from $25 to $50--you'll hear much higher figures for the crowd elsewhere because by 
the end of the show so many more fans had arrived and the place looked almost sold out, but those were 
the box office figures), the best gate for a non-WWF show in years in the market and a bigger house than 
the past two WWF shows in the market. Still, the show wasn't profitable, although with something like 
$16,000 in just a few days before the show, the promoters had to be thrilled to come out with only slight 
losses. New York was suspect because it has a much smaller Mexican population than Chicago and 
Galavision is only available in about 250,000 of the metro area's 5.5 million households, so based on 
exposure it would be equivalent to a WWF or WCW show, available on television in all households, drawing 
60,000 fans. This group running infrequently in selective markets and eventual PPV shows is a potential 
goldmine, but not relying on Galavision nationally as it's carried by enough cable systems. They need local 
syndication in markets that have spanish language television, like they have in San Jose and Los Angeles 
and like the old Los Angeles promotion had on SIN in the 70s, to be able to turn over the big profit. Didn't 
hear much about the show other than most felt Chicago was the stronger card, but New York was a good 
show with strong heat and work rate. Jake Roberts looked even worse than before on top, but with tag 
partners like Machine & Guerrero and Parka & Psicosis, they had a great match with Konnan & Aguayo & 
Caras. Told Konnan and Heavy Metal drew the biggest crowd reactions in New York, but it was the minis 
that stole the show. Tito Santana also received a big reaction although Too Cold Scorpio was really an 
unknown to the audience but worked well. Pedro Morales was honored before the main event, however it 
appeared only 10 to 15% of the audience had any idea who he was, but they were polite in reaction to 
him. I'm not certain whether or not either show was taped for television. 

There was a lot of talk of putting on a show in Denver before the end of the year. While it isn't official, the 
plan right now is for a PPV show in November from San Jose (there definitely won't be a San Jose show in 
early August) with WCW sharing in the promotion of the show and the tentative plans are for some AAA 
matches to appear on the WCW cable shows leading up to the event. Gary Juster of WCW was at the New 
York show, as was former wrestling promoter and current baseball owner Eddie Einhorn while AAA 
promoter Antonio Pena was in Orlando for the WCW PPV show, so you can expect some sort of tie-in to be 
more obvious over the next few months. 

*********************************************************** 


Something funny happened at the end of the barbed wire match on 7/16 at the ECW Arena. After a 
bloodbath with the Funk Brothers vs. Public Enemy which ended with approximately 80 chairs in the ring, 
Terry Funk wrapped up in barbed wire with a garbage can stuck to his chest, and a brawl which went out 
of the building into the parking lot while dozens of the elderly were arriving at the building for their weekly 
Saturday midnight bingo (the ECW Arena doubles as a bingo hall), the fans gave both wrestlers and the 
show a standing ovation, and then chanted "ECW, ECW." 
bloodbath with the Funk Brothers vs. Public Enemy which ended with approximately 80 chairs in the ring, 
Terry Funk wrapped up in barbed wire with a garbage can stuck to his chest, and a brawl which went out 
of the building into the parking lot while dozens of the elderly were arriving at the building for their weekly 
Saturday midnight bingo (the ECW Arena doubles as a bingo hall), the fans gave both wrestlers and the 
show a standing ovation, and then chanted "ECW, ECW." 

The folks who bring you it's not for everyone wrestling, Eastern Championship Wrestling in Philadelphia, ran 
their monthly card at the ECW Arena before about 850 of the hardest-core fans in the country. The 
converted bingo hall is even smaller and more dingy in person than it appears on television, and I don't see 
how you could put more than 1,000 in the building. But the ECW Arena is the closest thing crowd-wise to 
Korakuen Hall in Tokyo. Its fans don't care about faces or heels. They cheer and boo who they won't, not 
who they're told to. And they are more knowledgeable about wrestling that any other crowd in the country. 
Like only the top Japan groups and AAA, the promotion itself is over to its audience to the point where 
even the referees are over. 

ECW isn't the wrestling of the past. It may not be the wrestling of the future. But it is right now the most 
innovative English language wrestling in the country, headlined by night-in and night-out the best performer 
in the country today, and that sure ain't Bret Hart. Or even Ric Flair. It's Sabu. 

Sabu, who did a plancha into a Frankensteiner while doing a run-in earlier in the show, did his first 
stretcher job ever in Philadelphia against ECW champ Shane Douglas in the semifinal match. Sabu sat 
Douglas down in a chair outside the ring, then got in the ring and gave Douglas and the chair a tope. 
Douglas wound up still in one piece when it was over. The chair wasn't as lucky. There were the requisite 
broken tables from suplexes. There were old-style moves and new-style moves. Brutal chair shots. A 
cannonball dive by Sabu off the apron. It blew anything on the next night's PPV show away, as did the 
show as a whole when compared with the WCW show in Orlando. And then, as they were going to the 
finish, all the power went off in the building. This was no angle. About a minute later, the power came on, 
and it didn't take the two long to regain the killed momentum. Sabu set up a table vertically and put 
Douglas standing by it. He then did an Asai-moonsault, but Douglas moved and Sabu crashed into the table 
almost like moonsaulting into a wall. He was taken away on a stretcher after losing via count out, but not 
before local favorite 911 managed by choke slam Douglas, Mr. Hughes and valet Angel (who must have 
jumped six feet in the air before taking the bump) to the biggest pops on the show. 

After taking literally forever to take the ropes down and do an FMW style barbed wire match, it was up to 
the Funks and Public Enemy to follow. Barbed wire matches are traditionally awful. What can you do but 
bleed? Somehow this didn't fit the bill. All four bled like crazy, but it would have been every bit as great 
without it. After brawling in the crowd, using wire cutters to take one side of the wire down and wrapping 
Terry up in it, and brawling outside the building, came Terry grabbing the house mic and asking for a chair. 
It was raining chairs within seconds, much as the raining pillows after the Muto-Vader match at the 1991 
G-1 Climax tournament match. This was a little too dangerous, however. The wrestlers were being 
blindsided with chairs left and right as fans were throwing every chair they could find into the ring. All it 
would take is one bad throw and someone in the audience getting hit the wrong way, and the promotion 
would be having too many problems. For all its positives, we're not for everyone could have been we're not 
for anyone with one fan who couldn't aim a chair hitting the wrong target. Somewhere admist all this, Terry 
did a clean job, after which Dory destroyed the Public Enemy with one chair shot after another. Terry once 
again asked the fans to throw him a chair, and it was raining chairs again with chair shots galore. Finally, 
wrapped up in barbed wire, Terry left the ring with Dory while the Public Enemy was buried under a sea of 
furniture. When they finally got up, the fans, realizing the show was over, gave them, although it was really 
the show itself, a standing ovation. No, it's not for everyone. But for those who it is for, they give them a 
great show. 

*********************************************************** 

This double issue is both the second and third issue of the current set. This means if you've got a (1) on 
your address label that your Observer subscription expires with next week's issue. Renewal rates for the 
United States, Canada and Mexico remain $8 for four issues, $15 for eight, $22 for 12, $28 for 16, $42 for 


24, $56 for 32 and $70 for 40. Rates for the rest of the world for weekly airmail delivery are $11 for four, 
$21 for eight, $30 for 12, $50 for 20, $70 for 28, up through $100 for 40 issues. All subscription renewals 
along with reports from live shows, news items and any other correspondence pertaining to this newsletter 
should be sent to the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228. 
$21 for eight, $30 for 12, $50 for 20, $70 for 28, up through $100 for 40 issues. All subscription renewals 
along with reports from live shows, news items and any other correspondence pertaining to this newsletter 
should be sent to the Wrestling Observer Newsletter, P.O. Box 1228, Campbell, CA 95009-1228. 

Fax messages can be sent after Noon Eastern time on a daily basis to 408-378-6562. Phone messages can 
be left 24 hours per day at 408-379-8067. For the most updated news, I can be reached at the Real 
Wrestling Hotline every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 900-903-9030 for 99 cents per minute. 

RESULTS 

7/1 Xalapa, Veracruz (AAA -6,000): Giro & Colorado b My Flowers & Pimpinela Escarlata, Ninja Turtles 
I & II & III b Marabunta & Elvis & Reptil **, Lola Gonzales & Vicky Carranza & Pantera Surena b Mujer 
Salvaje & Martha Villalobos, Shitara *1/2, Lizmark & Lizmark Jr. & Latin Lover b Los Payasos-DQ ***, 
Konnan El Barbaro & El Hijo del Santo & Mascara Sagrada b Cien Caras & Mascara Ano 2000 & Universo 
2000-DQ *3/4 

7/1 Arena Mexico in Mexico City (EMLL): Ultimatum & Platino b Astro Jr. & Nuevo Lynx, Felino & 
Javier Cruz & Popitekus b Super Astro & Blue Demon Jr. & Americo Rocca, Dr. Wagner Jr. & Gran Markus 
Jr. & El Hijo del Gladiador d Dandy & Silver King & El Texano, Black Magic & Negro Casas & Mano Negra b 
Vampiro Canadiense & Ultimo Dragon & La Fiera, Atlantis & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. b Miguel Perez & Ricky 
Santana-DQ 

7/4 Bricktown, OK (Power Zone Wrestling -1,000/free show as part of downtown July 4th 
festival): Casey Cannon b T.C. Gold, Eric Awesome b Panther, Chains & Chopper b Lawton Mauler & New 
York Express, Wild Maverick & Panther b Chains & Chopper, Treach Phillips Jr. b Psycho I, Tom Jones & 
Billy Phoenix b TNT & Rick Valentine, Kevin Von Erich & Rick Garrett b Randy Rhodes & Shawn Summers 

7/5 Arena Coliseo in Mexico City (EMLL): Pegaso & Angel de Plata b Tigre de Oro & Astro Jr., Lady 
Apache & Cynthia Moreno & Guerrero Purpura b Practicane & La Diabolica & Maria del Angel, Mascara 
Magica & La Sombra & Chicago Express b Titan & Popitekus & Halcon Negro Jr., Hayabusa & Ringo 
Mendoza & El Hijo del Solitario b Mogur & Jaque Mate & Tornado Negro, Mocho Cota & Bestia Salvaje & 
Emilio Charles Jr. b Los Brazos 

7/7 Mexico City Pista Arena Revolucion (EMLL): Kid Guerrero b Turako, Olimpus & Olimpico b Sanson 
& Cerebro, Felino & Atila Jr. & Corazan Salvaje b Aguila Solitaria & Atlantico & Pantera II, El Brazo & Brazo 
de Oro & Rayo de Jalisco Jr. b El Egipcio & Emilio Charles Jr. & Sultan Gargola 

7/8 Wels, Austria (WWF -750): Sparky Plugg b Adam Bomb, Jeff Jarrett b Doink the Clown (Ray 
Apollo), Mabel b Bam Bam Bigelow, Lex Luger b Crush, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ, Smoking Gunns 
b Rock & Roll Express 

7/8 Netzahualcoyotl (UWA): Condor Man & Relicario b Rey Richard & Veneno, Los Machos I & II & III b 
Takeda & Gran Apaches I & II, Black Jack & Spartaco & Scorpio Sr. b Canadian Tiger (Mike Lozansky) & El 
Hijo de Anibal & Gamma, El Signo & Negro Navarro & Rocky Santana b The King & Transformer & Black 
Power II, Mr. Atlas & Dos 

Caras & Canek b Los Villanos III & IV & V-DQ 

7/11 Memphis (USWA): Jeff Gaylord b Leon Downs, Reggie B. Fine b Tony Williams, Bart Sawyer b Tony 
Falk, Doug Basham b Spellbinder (Spellbinder failed to pin him twice in 10:00 thus forfeited the match), 
USWA tag title: PG-13 b Eliminators-DQ, USWA title: Brian Christopher b Dream Machine to win title, Non-
title barbed wire match: Tommy Rich b Jerry Lawler, Machine & Rich & Doug Gilbert b Moondogs & 
Christopher 

7/11 Nagoya (All Japan women): Chapparita Asari b Rie Tamada, Kaoru Ito b Infernal Kaoru, Etsuko 
Mita b Tomoko Watanabe, Toshiyo Yamada & Mima Shimoda b Bull Nakano & Takako Inoue, Manami 


Toyota b Sakie Hasegawa, Kyoko Inoue & Yumiko Hotta b Suzuka Minami & Aja Kong 


7/12 Essen, Germany (WWF -6,000 sellout): Adam Bomb b Sparky Plugg **, WWF womens title: 
Alundra Blayze b Luna Vachon **1/4, Bam Bam Bigelow b Mabel *1/2, Lex Luger b Crush *, Smoking 
Gunns b Rock & Roll Express *3/4, Doink the Clown b Jeff Jarrett *3/4, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ 
**3/4 


7/12 Kagoshima (All Japan -3,500 sellout): Masao Inoue b Kentaro Shiga, The Eagle b Satoru Asako, 
Johnny Smith b Richard Slinger, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota b Ryakaku Izumida & 
Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Kurt Beyer & Johnny Ace, PWF jr. 
title: Dan Kroffat b Masa Fuchi to win title, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa b Tamon 
Honda & Jun Akiyama & Takao Omori 23:38, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Stan 
Hansen & Doug Furnas & Tom Zenk 


7/12 Heckinan (All Japan women -1,880): Prelim results unavailable, Suzuka Minami b Toshiyo 
Yamada, Aja Kong & Kyoko Inoue & Takako Inoue b Sakie Hasegawa & Etsuko Mita & Manami Toyota 


7/13 Kiel, Germany (WWF): Sparky Plugg b Adam Bomb, WWF womens title: Alundra Blayze b Luna 
Vachon, Mabel b Bam Bam Bigelow, Lex Luger b Crush, Smoking Gunns b Rock & Roll Express, Jeff Jarrett 
b Doink the Clown, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ 


7/13 Miyazaki (All Japan -3,050 sellout): Satoru Asako b Kentaro Shiga, Masao Inoue & Yoshinari 
Ogawa b Kurt Beyer & Ryakaku Izumida, Johnny Smith b Tsuyoshi Kikuchi, Haruka Eigen & Mighty Inoue b 
Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Richard Slinger & The Eagle, 
Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Tom Zenk & Johnny Ace, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi b Tamon Honda 
& Jun Akiyama, Stan Hansen & Giant Baba & Takao Omori b Masa Fuchi & Akira Taue & Toshiaki Kawada 


7/13 Cortland, OH (IWA -3,200 free fair grandstand show): T.C. Reynolds b Psycho Mike, Doink 
the Clown (Matt Osborne) b Ron Cumberledge, Haiti Kid b Little Ninja, Preston Steele b Greg Valentine-DQ, 
Jim Duggan b Scott Summers, Jim Neidhart b Brutus Beefcake-COR 


7/14 Tokyo Coliseum (LLPW joint show -8,300): Michiko Omukai (LLPW) b Chapparita Asari (AJW), 
Mizuki Endo & Mikiko Futagami (LLPW) b Tomoko Watanabe & Rie Tamada (AJW), Rumi Kazama & Carol 
Midori & Michiko Nagashima (LLPW) b Miwa Sato & Yukie Nabeno & Nurse Nakamura (FMW), UWA tag title: 
Etsuko Mita & Mima Shimoda (AJW) b Miki Handa & Jen Yukari (LLPW) 23:00, Megumi Kudo (FMW) b 
Yasha Kurenai (LLPW), Harley Saito & Noriyo Tateno (LLPW) b Kyoko Inoue & Takako Inoue (AJW), 
Combat Toyoda (FMW) b Eagle Sawai (LLPW), Chain death match: Bull Nakano (AJW) b Shinobu Kandori 


22:36 
7/14 Manila, Philippines (WWF): 1-2-3 Kid b Kwang, Luke Williams & Koko Ware b Reno Riggins & 
Barry Horowitz, Rick Martel b Jim Powers, Undertaker b Yokozuna-DQ, Tatanka b The Barbarian, WWF tag 
title: Head Shrinkers b Well Dunn, WWF title: Bret Hart b Owen Hart 

7/14 Niage (All Japan -2,400 sellout): Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Kentaro Shiga, Richard Slinger b Ryakaku 
Izumida, Tamon Honda & Yoshinari Ogawa b Tom Zenk & The Eagle, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo 
Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Kurt Beyer 
& Johnny Smith, Stan Hansen & Takao Omori b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, Kenta Kobashi d Johnny Ace 
30:00, Mitsuharu Misawa & Jun Akiyama & Satoru Asako b Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Masao Inoue 

22:00 
7/14 Toyoura (New Japan -1,800 sellout): Tadao Yasuda & Yuji Nagata b Manabu Nakanishi & 
Tokimitsu Ishizawa, Akitoshi Saito b Shinichi Nakano, Tatsutoshi Goto b Takayuki Iizuka, Yoshiaki Yatsu b 
Michiyoshi Ohara, Kengo Kimura b Akira Nogami, Jushin Liger & El Samurai & Shinjiro Ohtani b Black Cat & 
American Love Machine & Black Tiger, Power Warrior & Hiroshi Hase & Shinya Hashimoto b Nasty Boys & 
Too Cold Scorpio, Keiji Muto & Masa Chono b Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Shiro 
Koshinaka & Great Kabuki b Osamu Kido & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami 


7/14 Lenoir, NC (SMW -250): Lance Storm b Chris Hamrick, SMW tag title: Scott & Steve Armstrong b 
Brian Lee & Chris Candido-DQ, No DQ match for SMW title: Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai (Brian 
Keyes), Street fight: Bruiser Bedlam b Steve Armstrong 
Brian Lee & Chris Candido-DQ, No DQ match for SMW title: Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai (Brian 
Keyes), Street fight: Bruiser Bedlam b Steve Armstrong 

7/14 Osaka Furitsu Gym (RINGS -6,539 sellout): Georgi Kandelaki b Rene Rose, Masayoshi Naruse b 
Yuri Beckashev, Mitsuya Nagai b Stepepanov Petrov, Andrei Kopilov b Yoshihisa Yamamoto, Volk Han b 
Hans Nyman, Akira Maeda b Dirk Leon-Vrij 

7/14 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (IWA -2,105 sellout): Matsuyama b Hiroshi Ono, Takashi Okano b 
Oriental, Dick Slater b Johnny Gomez, Head Hunters b Shoji Nakamaki & Canek, Miguel Perez b 
Leatherface, Coffin match: New Jason the Terrible (Tracy Smothers) b Original Jason the Terrible (Roberto 
Rodriguez), Nobutaka Araya b Yukihiro Kanemura 

7/15 Albuquerque, NM (WCW -1,200): Brian Pillman b Diamond Dallas Page **, Guardian Angel b 
Ron Simmons ***, Marcus Bagwell & The Patriot b Paul Roma & Paul Orndorff **1/2, Non-title: Johnny B. 
Badd b Steven Regal ***, Dustin Rhodes & Arn Anderson b Bunkhouse Buck & Amarillo Slim (Erik Watts) 
***1/2, Non-title: Sting b Steve Austin *** 

7/15 Juan de la Barrera Gym in Mexico City (AAA -10,600 sellout): Prelim results unavailable, 
Jerrito Estrada & Espectrito & Fuercita Guerrera b Mascarita Sagrada & Octagoncito & Micro Konnan, Rey 
Misterio Jr. & Octagon & El Hijo del Santo b Fuerza Guerrera & Blue Panther & Psicosis, Cien Caras & 
Mascara Ano 2000 & Universo 2000 & La Parka b Konnan El Barbaro & Mascara Sagrada & Perro Aguayo & 
Lizmark 

7/15 Philadelphia (ECW TV taping -147): Ian Rotten b Hack Myers, Ray Odyssey b Steve Richards, 
Chad Austin b Damien Stone, ECW TV title: Mikey Whippreck b Sandman-DQ, Terry Funk b Keith Scherer, 
ECW title: Shane Douglas b Tommy Dreamer, Tazmaniac b Myers, Dory & Terry Funk & Dreamer b Pit Bulls 
& Jimmy Snuka, Austin b Richards, Sabu b Odyssey, Pit Bulls DDQ Snuka & Tazmaniac, Public Enemy b 
Richards & Stone, Jason b Scherer, Rottens b Joel Hartgood & Dave Sendoff 

7/15 Arena Mexico in Mexico City (EMLL): Prelim results unavailable, El Hijo del Solitario & Hayabusa 
& Blue Demon Jr. b Cachorro Mendoza & Mocho Cota & Jaque Mate, Rayo de Jalisco Jr. & Atlantis & 
Pegasus Kid b Emilio Charles Jr. & Bestia Salvaje & Pierroth Jr., CMLL trios titles: Dr. Wagner Jr. & Gran 
Markus Jr. & El Hijo del Gladiador b Silver King & El Texano & Dandy 

7/15 Kumaya (IWA): Takashi Okano b Matsuyama, Leatherface b Oriental, Dick Slater b Tracy Smothers, 
Head Hunters & Johnny Gomez b Nobutaka Araya & Hiroshi Ono & Miguel Perez, UWA hwt title: Canek b 
Original Jason the Terrible, Barbed wire barricade match: Yukihiro Kanemura b Shoji Nakamaki 

7/16 Nagasaki (All Japan -3,500): Satoru Asako b Kentaro Shiga, Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Ryukaku Izumida, 
Terry Gordy & Richard Slinger b Masao Inoue & Kurt Beyer, Jumbo Tsuruta & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo 
Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Johnny 
Smith & The Eagle, Stan Hansen & Tom Zenk b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, Steve Williams & Johnny Ace b 
Kenta Kobashi & Jun Akiyama, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Takao Omori b Giant Baba & Mitsuharu 
Misawa & Tamon Honda 24:08 

7/16 Philadelphia (ECW -850): Axl & Ian Rotten b Rockin Rebel & Hack Myers *, ECW TV title: Mikey 
Whippreck b Chad Austin-DQ ***, Tommy Dreamer b Steve Richards *1/2, Mr. Hughes b Dreamer *1/4, 
Tazmaniac & Sabu b Pit Bulls ***, Double cane match: The Sandman b Tommy Cairo ***, ECW title: 
Shane Douglas b Sabu-COR ****1/4, No rope barbed wire match: Public Enemy b Dory & Terry Funk **** 

7/16 Morristown, TN (SMW -500): Steve Skyfire b James Atkins, Lance Storm b Kendo the Samurai, 
SMW tag title: Steve & Scott Armstrong b Brian Lee & Chris Candido-DQ, Street fight: Bruiser Bedlam b 
Steve Armstrong, SMW title: Dirty White Boy b Lee 

7/16 Trujillo Alto, PR (WWC): Mohammad Hussein b Gator McAlliser, Tahitian Warrior b Pulgarcito, 
Isaac Rosario b El Exotico, WWC TV title: Carlitos Colon b Fidel Sierra (Cuban Assassin), WWC tag title: Rey 


Gonzalez & El Bronco b Bruise Brothers-DQ, Universal title: Dutch Mantel NC Invader #1, Lights out match: 
Eddie Gilbert DDQ Gonzalez Eddie Gilbert DDQ Gonzalez 

7/16 London, England (World Martial Arts Wrestling Federation): The Butcher b Paul Singh, The 
Warrior (Chris Walker) d Iron Sheik, Demolition Ax (Bill Eadie) & Blast (Richard Charland) b Big Bully Busich 
& Warrior, Tiger Jeet Singh Jr. b Hercules Hernandez, Tiger Jeet Singh Sr. b Russian Iron Horse 

7/17 Tokyo Sumo Hall (WAR -11,050 sellout): Masanobu Kurisu b Yuji Yasuraoka, One-night six-man 
tournament: Ashura Hara & Earthquake John Tenta & Ginsei Shinzaki b Gedo & Jado & Hiromichi Fuyuki, 
Koki Kitahara & Takashi Ishikawa & Koji Ishinriki b Koji Kitao & Akio Kobayashi & Nariaki Mochizuki, Kendo 
Nagasaki & Masashi Aoyagi & Arashi b Animal Hamaguchi & Shoichi Funaki & Nobukazu Hirai, Genichiro 
Tenryu & Atsushi Onita & Bam Bam Bigelow b Vampiro Canadiense & Warlord & Lion Heart (Chris Jericho), 
Hara & Tenta & Shinzaki b Ishikawa & Ishinriki & Kitahara, Bigelow & Tenryu & Onita b Nagasaki & Aoyagi 
& Arashi, UWA middleweight title: Ultimo Dragon b Great Sasuke 22:23, Tenryu & Onita & Bigelow b Hara & 
Tenta & Shinzaki to win tournament 

7/17 Himeji (New Japan -2,500): Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Yuji Nagata b Tokimitsu Ishizawa & El Samurai, 
Tatsutoshi Goto b Hiro Saito, Jushin Liger & Shinjiro Ohtani b Black Tiger & Norio Honaga, Manabu 
Nakanishi & Hiroshi Hase & Power Warrior b Nasty Boys & Too Cold Scorpio, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great 
Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka b Riki Choshu & Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka, Tatsumi Fujinami & Osamu Kido 
b American Love Machine & Black Cat, Masa Chono b Michiyoshi Ohara, Keiji Muto b Akitoshi Saito, Shinya 
Hashimoto b Kengo Kimura 

7/17 Wildwood, NJ (ECW -200): Jimmy Snuka won Battle Royal, Rockin Rebel b Hack Myers, ECW TV 
title: Mikey Whippreck b Chad Austin-DQ, Tommy Cairo b Sandman, Tazmaniac b Pit Bull #1, Sabu b Ray 
Ides, Mr. Hughes b Tommy Dreamer, ECW tag title: Public Enemy b Axl & Ian Rotten, ECW title: Shane 
Douglas b Snuka 

7/17 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (FMW -2,150 sellout): Judge Dredd b Hideki Hosaka, Combat Toyoda & 
Shark Tsuchiya & Tsuppari Mack b Megumi Kudo & Miwa Sato & Keiko Iwame, Katsuji Ueda b Goro 
Tsurumi-DQ, Yukie Nabeno b Crusher Maedomari, Mr. Gannosuke & Katsutoshi Niiyama b Ricky Fuji & Big 
Titan, Barbed wire barricade death match: Mr. Pogo & The Gladiator & Hisakatsu Oya b Atsushi Onita & 
Tarzan Goto & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga 

7/18 Tattori (New Japan -3,700): Shinjiro Ohtani b Tatsuhito Takaiwa, American Love Machine & Too 
Cold Scorpio & Black Tiger b Tokimitsu Ishizawa & Yuji Nagata & El Samurai, Michiyoshi Ohara b Osamu 
Kido, Akitoshi Saito b Hiro Saito, Hiroshi Hase b Tatsutoshi Goto, Kengo Kimura b Power Warrior, Nasty 
Boys & Black Cat b Tadao Yasuda & Riki Choshu & Tatsumi Fujinami, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b 
Shinya Hashimoto & Manabu Nakanishi, Shiro Koshinaka & Great Kabuki & Kuniaki Kobayashi b Jushin Liger 
& Masa Chono & Keiji Muto 

7/18 Onomichi (All Japan -1,700 sellout): Masao Inoue b Kentaro Shiga, Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas 
b Kurt Beyer & Ryukaku Izumida, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Tom Zenk & The Eagle, Giant 
Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Stan Hansen & 
Takao Omori b Johnny Smith & Johnny Ace, Kenta Kobashi & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi & Tamon Honda b Richard 
Slinger & Terry Gordy & Steve Williams, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa b Mitsuharu 
Misawa & Jun Akiyama & Satoru Asako 

7/18 Yokkaichi (FMW -3,407 sellout): Koji Nakagawa b Gosaku Goshogawara, Keiko Iwame b Mayumi 
Shimizu, Battle Ranger b Damian, Hisakatsu Oya b Masato Tanaka, Tsuppari Mack & Shark Tsuchiya & 
Crusher Maedomari & Combat Toyoda b Yukie Nabeno & Nurse Nakamura & Miwa Sato & Megumi Kudo, Big 
Titan b Katsutoshi Niiyama, Ricky Fuji & Judge Dredd b Mach Hayato & Tarzan Goto, No rope barbed wire 
street fight tornado death match: Atsushi Onita & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Mr. Gannosuke b The Gladiator & 
Mr. Pogo & Hideki Hosaka 

7/18 Memphis (USWA -1,650): Jeff Gaylord b Tony Falk, Bart Sawyer b Reggie B. Fine, Spellbinder b 
Doug Basham, Non-title stretcher match: Eliminators b PG-13, Jerry Lawler b Tommy Rich, Handicap 


hospital elimination match: Dream Machine & Doug Gilbert & Rich & Scott Bowden b Brian Christopher & 
Moondogs, Gaylord won Battle Royal to earn title shot, Unified title: Sid Vicious b Gaylord Moondogs, Gaylord won Battle Royal to earn title shot, Unified title: Sid Vicious b Gaylord 

7/19 Atlanta Center Stage (WCW Saturday night taping): Non-squash results: Ric Flair & Steve 
Austin b Sting & Rick Steamboat 27:00 ****, Austin b Brian Armstrong, Jim Duggan b Tex Slazenger 

7/19 Kuraishiki (All Japan -2,700 sellout): Satoru Asako b Kentaro Shiga, Masao Inoue b Ryakaku 
Izumida, Terry Gordy & Richard Slinger b Kurt Beyer & Tom Zenk, Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa 
Fuchi b Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota, Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas b Abdullah the Butcher 
& Giant Kimala II, Jun Akiyama & Tamon Honda b Johnny Smith & The Eagle, Steve Williams & Johnny Ace 
b Stan Hansen & Takao Omori, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Toshiaki Kawada & 
Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa 22:34 

7/19 Gifu (New Japan -4,000 sellout): Tadao Yasuda & Tokimitsu Ishizawa b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & 
Yuji Nagata, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b Black Cat & Too Cold Scorpio, Shinjiro Ohtani & El Samurai 
& Jushin Liger b Hiro Saito & American Love Machine & Black Tiger, Masa Chono b Akitoshi Saito, Kengo 
Kimura b Yoshiaki Fujiwara, Riki Choshu b Michiyoshi Ohara, Tatsumi Fujinami b Tatsutoshi Goto, Power 
Warrior & Hiroshi Hase b Nasty Boys, Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka & Kuniaki Kobayashi b Manabu 
Nakanishi & Keiji Muto & Shinya Hashimoto 

7/19 Takasago (FMW -2,756 sellout): Masato Tanaka b Tetsuhiro Kuroda, Mayumi Shimizu b Kaori 
Nakayama, Mach Hayato b Koji Nakagawa, Ricky Fuji & Big Titan b Gosaku Goshogawara & Battle Ranger, 
Tsuppari Mack & Shark Tsuchiya & Crusher Maedomari & Combat Toyoda b Keiko Iwame & Yukie Nabeno & 
Miwa Sato & Megumi Kudo, Judge Dredd b Damian, Hisakatsu Oya & Goro Tsurumi b Katsutoshi Niiyama & 
Tarzan Goto, No rope barbed wire street fight tornado death match: Mr. Gannosuke & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga 
& Atsushi Onita b Hideki Hosaka & The Gladiator & Mr. Pogo 

7/20 Suwa (New Japan -1,750): Tadao Yasuda & Manabu Nakanishi b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & Tokimitsu 
Ishizawa, Black Cat & American Love Machine b Yuji Nagata & Osamu Kido, Too Cold Scorpio & Black Tiger 
b Shinjiro Ohtani & El Samurai, Jushin Liger & Power Warrior b Norio Honaga & Hiro Saito, Nasty Boys b 
Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka, Tatsumi Fujinami b Akitoshi Saito, Yoshiaki Fujiwara b Tatsutoshi Goto, 
Shinya Hashimoto b Michiyoshi Ohara, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Shiro Koshinaka & Great Kabuki b Masa Chono 
& Keiji Muto & Hiroshi Hase 

7/20 Okayama (FMW -2,688 sellout): Tetsuhiro Kuroda b Gosaku Goshogawara, Battle Ranger & Koji 
Nakagawa b Masato Tanaka & Mach Hayato, Damian b Goro Tsurumi-DQ, Tsuppari Mack & Shark Tsuchiya 
& Crusher Maedomari & Combat Toyoda b Yukie Nabeno & Nurse Nakamura & Miwa Sato & Megumi Kudo, 
Hisakatsu Oya b Judge Dredd, Tarzan Goto & Mr. Gannosuke b Ricky Fuji & Big Titan, No rope barbed wire 
street fight tornado death match: Atsushi Onita & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Sambo Asako b Hideki Hosaka & 
The Gladiator & Mr. Pogo 

7/20 Iwade (IWA): Original Jason the Terrible b Matsuyama, Canek b Oriental, Leatherface b Takashi 
Okano, Bunkhouse match: Johnny Gomez & Yukihiro Kanemura b Hiroshi Ono & Shoji Nakamaki, New Jason 
the Terrible b Miguel Perez, IWA title tournament final: Dick Slater b Nobutaka Araya to become first 
champion 

7/21 Tokyo Korakuen Hall (All Japan -2,100 sellout): Masao Inoue b Kentaro Shiga, Mighty Inoue b 
Satoru Asako, Tom Zenk b Kurt Beyer, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota b Masa Fuchi & 
Haruka Eigen & Ryakaku Izumida, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Terry Gordy & The Eagle, Stan 
Hansen & Johnny Smith b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Yoshinari Ogawa b 
Tamon Honda & Jun Akiyama & Takao Omori, Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b 
Steve Williams & Johnny Ace & Richard Slinger 

7/21 Saku (New Japan -1,680): Manabu Nakanishi b Yuji Nagata, Akira Nogami & Takayuki Iizuka b 
Hiro Saito & Norio Honaga, Black Cat & American Love Machine & Black Tiger b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & 
Shinjiro Ohtani & El Samurai, Osamu Kido b Akitoshi Saito, Power Warrior b Michiyoshi Ohara, Kengo 
Kimura b Hiroshi Hase, Great Kabuki & Shiro Koshinaka & Kuniaki Kobayashi b Tadao Yasuda & Tatsumi 


Fujinami & Yoshiaki Fujiwara, Keiji Muto b Tatsutoshi Goto, Jushin Liger & Shinya Hashimoto & Masa Chono 
b Nasty Boys & Too Cold Scorpio b Nasty Boys & Too Cold Scorpio 

7/21 Wajima (FMW -3,310 sellout): Masato Tanaka & Mach Hayato b Tetsuhiro Kuroda & Battle 
Ranger, Yoshika Ishikura b Keori Nakayama, Tsuppari Mack & Shark Tsuchiya & Crusher Maedomari & 
Combat Toyoda b Mayumi Shimizu & Keiko Iwame & Yukie Nabeno & Megumi Kudo, Judge Dredd b Koji 
Nakagawa, Ricky Fuji & Big Titan b Damian & Katsutoshi Niiyama, Tarzan Goto b Hideki Hosaka, No rope 
barbed wire street fight tornado death match: Hisakatsu Oya & Mr. Pogo & The Gladiator b Mr. Gannosuke 
& Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Atsushi Onita 

7/22 Shimizu (All Japan -3,300 sellout): Satoru Asako b Kentaro Shiga, Masao Inoue & Yoshinari 
Ogawa b Tsuyoshi Kikuchi & Ryakaku Izumida, Jun Akiyama & Tamon Honda b Kurt Beyer & Tom Zenk, 
Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo Momota b Mighty Inoue & Haruka Eigen & Masa Fuchi, Johnny Smith 
& The Eagle b Terry Gordy & Richard Slinger, Abdullah the Butcher & Giant Kimala II b Dan Kroffat & Doug 
Furnas, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue b Stan Hansen & Takao Omori, PWF world & Intl tag titles: 
Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi b Johnny Ace & Steve Williams 27:48 

7/22 Nagaoka (New Japan -3,800 sellout): Norio Honaga & Hiro Saito b Tatsuhito Takaiwa & 
Manabu Nakanishi, Yoshiaki Fujiwara & Tokimitsu Ishizawa b Yuji Nagata & Osamu Kido, Black Cat & 
American Love Machine & Black Tiger b Shinjiro Ohtani & Too Cold Scorpio & El Samurai, Nasty Boys b 
Tatsumi Fujinami & Tadao Yasuda, Hiroshi Hase b Akitoshi Saito, Keiji Muto b Michiyoshi Ohara, Masa 
Chono b Kengo Kimura, Shinya Hashimoto b Tatsutoshi Goto, Kuniaki Kobayashi & Great Kabuki & Shiro 
Koshinaka b Jushin Liger & Akira Nogami & Power Warrior 

7/22 Montgomeryville, PA (ECW -350): Tommy Dreamer b Pit Bull #1, Mr. Hughes b Tommy Cairo, 
Tazmaniac b Pit Bull #2, ECW TV title: Mikey Whippreck b Steve Richards-DQ, Sandman b Ray Odyssey, 
ECW tag title: Public Enemy & Axl & Ian Rotten, ECW title: Shane Douglas b Tazmaniac 

7/22 Fairleah, WV (SMW -100): Thrillseekers b Bart & Brad Batten, Tracy Smothers b Killer Kyle, No 
DQ match for SMW title: Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai, Rock & Roll Express b Chris Candido & Kyle 

7/22 Esawa (All Japan women): Chapparita Asari b Rie Tamada, Kaoru Ito b Kumiko Maekawa, Yumiko 
Hotta & Suzuka Minami b Kyoko Inoue & Sakie Hasegawa, Aja Kong b Kaoru Ito, Etsuko Mita & Toshiyo 
Yamada b Manami Toyota & Mima Shimoda 

7/23 Tampa (WWF -3,000): Jeff Jarrett b Doink the Clown, WWF womens title: Alundra Blayze b Luna 
Vachon, Jerry Lawler b Duke Droese-DQ, Undertaker (Brian Lee) b Sparky Plugg, Bam Bam Bigelow b 
Mabel, Adam Bomb b Pierre, Heavenly Bodies b Smoking Gunns, Cage match for IC title: Diesel b Razor 
Ramon 

7/23 Chicago Rosemont Horizon (AAA/IWC -5,200/4,425 paid): Tito Santana & Too Cold Scorpio 
b Dallas Page & Louie Spicolli, Espectrito & Octagoncito b Mascarita Sagrada & Jerrito Estrada, Heavy Metal 
& Rey Misterio Jr. & Misterioso b Los Payasos, AAA tag titles: Love Machine & Eddy Guerrero b Octagon & 
El Hijo del Santo to win titles, Konnan El Barbaro & Perro Aguayo & Cien Caras b Jake Roberts & La Parka 
& Psicosis 

7/23 Kofu (All Japan -4,400 sellout): Masao Inoue b Kurt Beyer, Yoshinari Ogawa b Kentaro Shiga, 
Jun Akiyama & Tsuyoshi Kikuchi b Dan Kroffat & Doug Furnas, Giant Baba & Rusher Kimura & Mitsuo 
Momota b Masa Fuchi & Haruka Eigen & Mighty Inoue, The Eagle & Johnny Ace b Abdullah the Butcher & 
Giant Kimala II, Steve Williams & Terry Gordy & Richard Slinger b Stan Hansen & Tom Zenk & Johnny 
Smith, Toshiaki Kawada & Akira Taue & Takao Omori b Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi & Satoru Asako 

7/23 Fukuoka (FMW -3,472): Tetsuhiro Kuroda b Gosaku Goshogawara, Keiko Iwame b Mayumi 
Shimizu, Damian b Mach Hayato, Katsutoshi Niiyama b Battle Ranger, Combat Toyoda & Shark Tsuchiya & 
Crusher Maedomari & Tsuppari Mack b Megumi Kudo & Miwa Sato & Yukie Nabeno & Nurse Nakamura, Big 
Titan & Ricky Fuji b The Gladiator & Goro Tsurumi, Tarzan Goto b Judge Dredd, No rope barbed wire street 
fight tornado death match: Atsushi Onita & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Mr. Gannosuke b Mr. Pogo & Hisakatsu 


Oya & Hideki Hosaka 

7/23 Chilhowie, VA (SMW -550): Dirty White Boy b Kendo the Samurai, Handicap match: Tracy 
Smothers b Killer Kyle & Jim Cornette, Thrillseekers b Bart & Brad Batten, Rock & Roll Express b Kyle & 
Chris Candido, White Boy won pole Battle Royal 

7/24 New York Paramount (AAA/IWC -3,300/2,800 paid): Dallas Page & Louie Spicolli b Indio 
Valiente & Bandido, Heavy Metal & Tito Santana & Too Cold Scorpio b Los Payasos-DQ, Mascarita Sagrada 
& Octagoncito b Espectrito & Jerrito Estrada, El Hijo del Santo & Octagon b Psicosis & La Parka, Konnan El 
Barbaro & Perro Aguayo & Cien Caras NC Jake Roberts & Love Machine & Eddy Guerrero 

7/24 North Tonawanda, NY (WWF): Duke Drose b Adam Bomb, WWF womens title: Alundra Blayze b 
Luna Vachon, The Undertaker (Brian Lee) b Sparky Plugg, Mabel b Bam Bam Bigelow, Doink the Clown b 
Jeff Jarrett, Heavenly Bodies b Smoking Gunns, IC title: Razor Ramon b Diesel-DQ 

7/24 Saga (FMW -2,954 sellout): Koji Nakagawa b Tetsuhiro Kuroda, Keiko Iwame b Yoshika Ishikura, 
Battle Ranger b Gosaku Goshogawara, Tsuppari Mack & Combat Toyoda & Shark Tsuchiya & Crusher 
Maedomari b Nurse Nakamura & Yukie Nabeno & Miwa Sato & Megumi Kudo, Katsutoshi Niiyama b Damian, 
Tarzan Goto b Ricky Fuji, Atsushi Onita & Mitsuhiro Matsunaga & Mr. Gannosuke b The Gladiator & Hideki 
Hosaka & Mr. Pogo 

7/25 Gadsden, AL (NWA Jim Crockett Promotions): Marc Valiant & Rick Garren b High Voltage, Rock 
& Roll Express b Michael Hayes & Mike Golden, NWA womens title: Peggy Lee Leather b Bambi, North 
American title: Greg Valentine b Junkyard Dog 

Special thanks to: Shannon Rose, Andy Stowell, Norm Connors, Rich Palladino, John Muse, Brian 
Hildebrand, Stuart Kemp, Billy McCarthy, Tony Hunter, Dan Parris, D.C. Chambers, Andy Nichols, Christian 
Bunderla, Jesse Money, Pete Botts, Bay Ragni, Mike Mahoney Jr., Bob Koenig, Cory Van Kleeck, Dave 
Scherer, Tim Harshmann, Steve "Dr. Lucha" Sims, Stefan Pickshaus, John Martinez, Bill Needham, Doug 
Hamsher, Bob Kindred, Dan Curtis, Steve Prazak, Peggy Watkins, Gary Woronchak, Tim Whitehead 

UWA 

No shows at El Toreo until 7/31. 

El Hijo del Santo was stripped of the UWA welterweight belt he'd won from Karloff Lagarde Jr. because 
Double Power is over and he won't be returning. 

Dos Caras (representing this group) and Rambo (representing AAA) have been having a war of the words in 
the press over the break-up of Double Power. Dos said the AAA wrestlers were mad because they were 
losing more matches than they were winning. Rambo said it was because the UWA guys were getting 70% 
of the purses even though the AAA guys were the ones drawing the crowds. 

Newcomer Mr. Atlas is getting a strong babyface push on top. He has the Scott Putski type of look. 

Canadian Tiger (Mike Lozansky) has returned. 

EMLL 

Reina Jubuki (Akira Hokuto) most likely won the CMLL womens title from La Diabolica at Arena Mexico on 
7/22. There was a satellite problem so that card wasn't available. 

They are doing an angle where El Brazo wants to turn heel so he's costing his brothers the wins around the 
horn. 

Worthless trivia: Wrestler Sangre Chicana has 20 children, 16 of them daughters. No wonder he isn't going 
to retire any time soon. 


Ricky Santana left for South Africa and Miguel Perez for Japan in the middle of a feud with Rayo de Jalisco 
Jr. & Atlantis. Jr. & Atlantis. 

Vampiro is saying he's not going to jump to AAA after all, but will work AAA shows in the United States. 

Pegasus Kid is in full-time as a headliner. 

ALL JAPAN 

Dan Kroffat captured the PWF jr. title from Masa Fuchi on 7/12 in Kagoshima with a finish of several 
reversals before Kroffat wound up on top. 

Terry Gordy returned as a surprise on 7/16 in Nagasaki for the Bruiser Brody Memorial show. There had 
been no publicity out that he'd be coming back, but he teamed with nephew Richard Slinger to beat Masao 
Inoue & Kurt Beyer. From photos, he physically looks the same, although he's being kept low on cards and 
hadn't worked with the top guys the first week. 

The only other major title match of the past two weeks was Mitsuharu Misawa & Kenta Kobashi keeping the 
tag titles beating Steve Williams & Johnny Ace on 7/22 in Shimizu when Misawa pinned Ace with a 
clothesline off the top rope in 27:48. 

Misawa vs. Williams for the Triple Crown will be 7/28 at Budokan Hall, and they'll be back at Budokan Hall 
on 9/3. 

TV ratings saw the 7/9 show do a 1.4 (but a 3.4 Neilsen rating) and 7/16 did a 1.5 

NEW JAPAN 

Announced thus far for the five nights in Sumo Hall headlined by the G-1 climax tournament are 8/3: El 
Gigante vs. Nailz, Jushin Liger & El Samurai vs. Dean Malenko & Gran Hamada (returning to New Japan 
after about 12 years away), Riki Choshu vs. Masa Chono, Keiji Muto vs. Yoshiaki Fujiwara, Yoshiaki Yatsu 
vs. Osamu Kido, Tatsumi Fujinami vs. Power Warrior, Shinya Hashimoto vs. Hiroshi Hase and Shiro 
Koshinaka vs. Takayuki Iizuka; 8/4: Rick & Scott Steiner vs. Scott Norton & Hercules Fernandez, Liger vs. 
Hamada for IWGP jr. title, Choshu vs. Yatsu, Muto vs. Chono, Fujiwara vs. Kido, Hase vs. Power, Hashimoto 
vs. Iizuka and Fujinami vs. Koshinaka; 8/5: Liger & Gigante vs. Samurai & Tadao Yasuda & Satoshi Kojima, 
Choshu vs. Muto, Yatsu vs. Fujiwara, Chono vs. Kido, Hashimoto vs. Power, Koshinaka vs. Hase, Fujinami 
vs. Iizuka; 8/6: Choshu vs. Fujiwara, Yatsu vs. Chono, Muto vs. Kido, Koshinaka vs. Power, Iizuka vs. Hase, 
Fujinami vs. Hashimoto; 8/7: Choshu vs. Kido, Chono vs. Fujiwara, Muto vs. Yatsu, Iizuka vs. Power, 
Koshinaka vs. Hashimoto and Fujinami vs. Hase. 

Current tour ended on 7/22. The Skinheads lost their 85 match series to New Japan by a 45-40 margin 
during the tour, however in main events virtually every show, Koshinaka & Great Kabuki & Kuniaki 
Kobayashi beat every New Japan team thrown at them including Muto & Chono & Hase. 

7/9 television did a 1.4 rating. 

Antonio Inoki is still making noises about putting together a match with George Foreman, who he didn't end 
up meeting in Orlando. Inoki met with Muhammad Ali in Denver on 7/16 enroute to Orlando. 

FMW 

The 8/28 Osaka Castle Hall card was announced with Atsushi Onita vs. Mr. Pogo on top again for Pogo's 
World Brass Knux title in a no rope barbed wire electrified explosive, etc. match, plus Tarzan Goto vs. 
Mitsuhiro Matsunaga, Double stretcher match with Sambo Asako & Mr. Gannosuke vs. Hisakatsu Oya & 
Goro Tsurumi, Ricky Fuji & Big Titan vs. The Gladiator & Hideki Hosaka, Sabu vs. Hayabusa, and WWA & 
Independent womens title with Combat Toyoda vs. Megumi Kudo. 

Masashi Aoyagi is headed in as on 7/17 at Korakuen Hall, he jumped Onita after his Korakuen Hall match 


and did the same the next night. Onita had four matches that day as he had earlier worked three matches 
in a WAR tournament at Sumo Hall. Aoyagi said he wants one more match with Onita before he retires. 
Trivial note is in 1989, the first-ever FMW show was headlined by Aoyagi beating Onita. Aoyagi debuts 7/31 
in Yokohama. Tarzan Goto and Matsunaga continue their angle with Goto warning Onita that Matsunaga is 
an Aoyagi spy (Matsunaga was originally one of Aoyagi's karate students before both became wrestlers). 
in a WAR tournament at Sumo Hall. Aoyagi said he wants one more match with Onita before he retires. 
Trivial note is in 1989, the first-ever FMW show was headlined by Aoyagi beating Onita. Aoyagi debuts 7/31 
in Yokohama. Tarzan Goto and Matsunaga continue their angle with Goto warning Onita that Matsunaga is 
an Aoyagi spy (Matsunaga was originally one of Aoyagi's karate students before both became wrestlers). 

It is expected that Onita will have a singles match against Great Sasuke on a Michinoku Pro show on 9/25 
in a barbed wire explosive match. 

The first job in the Big Titan vs. Gladiator (long-time tag partners here) feud took place on 7/23 in Fukuoka 
in a tag match when Titan & Fuji beat Gladiator & Tsurumi when Titan pinned Gladiator. The two have a 
singles match this week. 

New woman wrestler Keori Nakayama is the daughter for former All Japan woman star Miyoko Hoshino, 
making her the first second generation Japanese women wrestler. 

OTHER JAPAN NOTES 

WAR packed Sumo Hall on 7/17 for a one-night trios tournament where Genichiro Tenryu & Onita & Bam 
Bam Bigelow came out on top beating Ashura Hara & Earthquake John Tenta & Ginsei Shizaki in the finals. 
The semifinal, which based on photos looked to be incredible and probably was responsible for packing the 
place was Great Sasuke get pinned challenging Ultimo Dragon for the UWA middleweight strap in 22:23. 
World six-man champs Gedo & Jado & Hiromichi Fuyuki were upset in the first round by Hara's trio. Onita's 
team also beat Vampiro & Lion Heart (Chris Jericho) & Warlord and Kendo Nagasaki & Aoyagi & Arashi 
before the finals. 

The Bull Nakano-Shinobu Kandori chain match on 7/14 at the Tokyo Coliseum drew 8,300 fans, ending with 
Nakano tying Kandori up with a chain and when she was immobilized, giving her a legdrop off the top rope 
for the pin. Kandori did a stretcher job and they even brought out the ambulance to sell the brutality of the 
match. Nakano starts for WWF on 7/28 in Canada. 

UWFI announced 10/8 Budokan Hall and 10/14 Osaka Castle Hall shows, both headlined by Super Vader vs. 
Gary Albright. They are lowering tickets at both shows since they are billed as Fan Appreciation cards, with 
Budokan seats ranging from $30 to $80 and Osaka from $30 to $70. 

Dick Slater won the IWA heavyweight title in the tournament final beating Nobutaka Araya on 7/20 in 
Iwade. Araya had beaten Canek in a semifinal while Slater had beaten Miguel Perez. 

Tracy Smothers is with the group working as the New Jason the Terrible feuding with Original Jason the 
Terrible which does sound like something WWF is doing a little bit. 

Rixson Gracie, the older brother of Royce, has an ultimate fight tournament featuring himself and other 
martial arts stars on 7/29 at Tokyo Bay NK Hall. 

Akira Maeda ran an angle on his 7/14 Osaka show, which drew a sellout 6,539. Opponent Dirk Leon-Vrij 
bloodied his nose and tried to stick his finger in his eye so Maeda came back with a leglock submission in 
just 2:54. After the match they had to separate the two of them and Maeda kicked him in the face 
reminiscent of the 1987 shoot kick with Riki Choshu that made Maeda the superstar that he once was. 

Ryuma Go has shows on 8/1 and 8/3 using Jesse Barr, Billy Jack Haynes and Chavo Guerrero. 

Joe Malenko returns for PWFG on 8/13. 

As of 7/18, Yumiko Hotta leads the women's grand prix tournament with 13 points with two bouts left, 
Takako Inoue is second with 11 with two bouts left and Sakie Hasegawa has ten points with three bouts 
left. Top finisher gets a title shot at Wrestlemarinpiad against Aja Kong, and top two get to enter the Tokyo 
Dome eight-women tournament. 


Chigusa Nagayo returns to All Japan women for the 8/24 Budokan show teaming with Toshiyo Yamada 
(who patterned her entire style after Nagayo) against Mariko Yoshida & Hasegawa. (who patterned her entire style after Nagayo) against Mariko Yoshida & Hasegawa. 

USWA 

Sid Vicious won the Unified title from Jerry Lawler by default at television on 7/16. They had a match 
scheduled for television but there was a pre-match altercation with Vicious giving Lawler the choke slam. 
Lawler couldn't come out for his match later on the show so he forfeited the title. On 7/18 in Memphis, 
Vicious was to defend against the winner of a Battle Royal. The last three were Tommy Rich, Jeff Gaylord 
and Lawler. Gaylord was out cold in the ring while Rich and Lawler fought, going out together, leaving 
Gaylord as the winner. Vicious hit the ring immediately, called for the bell and gave Gaylord a choke slam 
keeping the title in about 20 seconds. The addition of Vicious brought the crowd up to about 1,650 fans 
and right near $10,000. From what I'm told, everyone here is thrilled with Sid's attitude. I'm not being 
sarcastic. 

Brian Christopher regained the USWA title from Dream Machine on 7/11 in Memphis. 

Bert Prentice is history so The Eliminators and Spellbinder are being managed by Reggie B. Fine. 

Some talk of Prentice running opposition. 

Spike Huber turned heel on television on 7/23 with Sid saying the two have been friends for a long time 
and Spike is his secret weapon. 

7/25 line-up has Bart Sawyer vs. Leon Downs, Spellbinder vs. Doug Basham, Koko Ware vs. Fine with Ware 
retiring if he loses and Fine having to return Frankie if he loses, PG-13 vs. Eliminators in a stretcher match, 
Lawler vs. Rich, Moondogs & Christopher vs. Doug Gilbert & Machine & Huber and a Battle Royal with the 
winner getting a shot at Sid that night. 

SMW 

Largely quiet two weeks with many of the group's wrestlers on tour or not around. 

There was an incident or two involving Timothy Well and Chris Candido backstage which could have turned 
into a bad scene but since Well Dunn is gone from the territory, everything has calmed down. 

Among those gone of late have included Chris Jericho (Japan), Tracy Smothers (Japan), Rock & Roll Express 
(Germany), Brian Lee (WWF) and Bruiser Bedlam (missed this past weekend). 

Chris Walker did debut after all doing a run-in attacking Dirty White Boy on 7/23 in Chilhowie, VA after 
White Boy had won a pole Battle Royal, putting him in the torture rack. Guess Walker was on tour in 
England doing an Ultimate Warrior knockoff role when he was originally going to do the angle with White 
Boy. 

Deadline for registering for Fan Week is immediately, if not sooner. SMW is also finally all caught up in 
mailing out souvenirs and will be sending out a new merchandise catalogue for all interested in September. 

Jake Roberts' wife did have the baby so his story about why he missed the dates is accurate, but the 
question remains why he didn't make that clear to Cornette from the start because Cornette would have 
had no problem with it. 

The widow and children of Whitey Caldwell will be appearing at the 8/5 Knoxville card to get a SMW Hall of 
Fame plaque. On the weekend television show, they dedicated the legends update segment showing still 
photos and newspaper clippings of Caldwell, who was the area's biggest star in the late 1960s and had a 
legendary 60:00 draw in an NWA title match against Dory Funk in Knoxville. 

HERE AND THERE 


ECW is expected to start on MSG cable in September, which will lead to expanding into the New York 
market. Next major ECW show is 8/13 with Mikey Whippreck vs. Jason for the TV title, 911 vs. Mr. Hughes 
and Terry Funk vs. Cactus Jack. Jack is still under contract to WCW at that time and word we get is they're 
cutting off working with ECW so we'll have to wait for confirmation of the match. Even though Funk works 
with WCW, he's an independent and not under contract to them. They'll be holding a tournament to 
determine the NWA heavyweight champ (who will end up working for Crockett) on 8/27 in Woodbridge, NJ. 
market. Next major ECW show is 8/13 with Mikey Whippreck vs. Jason for the TV title, 911 vs. Mr. Hughes 
and Terry Funk vs. Cactus Jack. Jack is still under contract to WCW at that time and word we get is they're 
cutting off working with ECW so we'll have to wait for confirmation of the match. Even though Funk works 
with WCW, he's an independent and not under contract to them. They'll be holding a tournament to 
determine the NWA heavyweight champ (who will end up working for Crockett) on 8/27 in Woodbridge, NJ. 

Jim Crockett has his first set of shows this week, 7/25 in Gadsden, AL, 7/26 TV taping in Chattanooga and 
7/28 in Spartanburg, SC. Among the names expected to be involved in the group are Greg Valentine, 
Junkyard Dog, Tommy Rich, Rock & Roll Express, Rod Price, Michael Hayes, The Cole Twins, Jim Cornette 
and Chris Candido with Tammy Fytch. Valentine will be North American champion, while Peggy Lee Leather 
will be NWA womens champion, although she'll probably lose the title to Bambi at the first taping. Tully 
Blanchard's work schedule won't allow him to make all the tapings so he'll cut hosting segments in studio 
around his schedule and Joe Pedicino will do play-by-play working either with Hayes or Cornette. Valentine 
will captain a heel trio called Hydra, with partners Ciba (Tony "Moadib" Norris) and Airies (Ron Powers). 
Supposedly the television will run Alabama, Mississippi, Northwest Florida and East Tennessee and 
Spartanburg, SC. 

Chi Chi Cruz of Winnipeg wrestling (real name Corey Peloquin) was seriously injured in a 7/9 boating 
accident when his boat was hit by another boat. Wrestler Robbie Royce was on the boat and knocked cold, 
and is complaining of headaches and suffered minor knee and wrist injuries but isn't expected to miss 
matches. Cruz underwent emergency surgery to repair his left elbow plus had a head-wound. He had a 
second surgery two days later. 

Reader James Scofield of St. Petersburg was awarded the 1994 Ellis Island Medal of Honor for significant 
contributions to America's heritage. Scofield is a retired former news research coordinator with the St. 
Petersburg Times. 

Radio show Inside the Squared Circle airs 11 p.m. to midnight every Saturday on WTEM (570 AM) in 
Washington, DC. 

Sabu and John "Pee Wee" Moore (the young ECW ref who always gets choke slammed by 911) helped do a 
show on 7/23 in Lincoln Park, MI with Sabu beating Al Snow in a **** ladder match on top. The match was 
for what was billed as the NWA Independent world title. 

Dennis Coraluzzo has three shows booked in Michigan, on 8/5 in Lincoln Park it'll be Sabu vs. Chris Benoit 
for the title, 8/6 in Jackson, MI it's Sabu vs. Benoit for the title and Jim Duggan vs. Ludvig Borga, and 8/7 
in Lima, OH is Sabu vs. Osamu Nishimura of New Japan, Benoit vs. Al Snow and Duggan vs. Borga. 

Howard Brody has a show on 8/7 in Miami Metro Zoo at 1:30 p.m. called Rumble in the Jungle with Duggan 
vs. King Kong Bundy, Tito Santana vs. Greg Valentine, Steve Keirn vs. Corporal Kirchner, Wrestling Clown 
vs. Bugsy McGraw and more. 

Bill Eadie, Iron Sheik, Hercules Hernandez, Big Bully Busich, Chris Walker, Tiger Jeet Singh Jr. & Sr. and 
Richard Charland worked a show on 7/16 in London, England. 

California International Wrestling has shows 9/11 in La Puente, CA at 2 p.m. with Road Warrior Hawk vs. 
Dan Severn, Sabu vs. Al Snow and Vandal Drummond vs. Fisico Nuclear in the long-awaited hair vs. hair 
match (I take that to mean Kurt Brown is finally getting a haircut. Severn vs. Snow will headline the GAME 
shootfighting show on 9/12 in Los Angeles. 

Sandy Barr has closed down his Championship Wrestling USA promotion based in Vancouver, WA, 
reportedly due to money losses suffered (rumored to be around $30,000 in total) for the combination 
AAA/CWUSA show with Tonya Harding on 6/22 that flopped at the box office. There is talk he'll be reopening 
at some point shortly. One of the reasons Harding did so little is the Washington commission stuck 
to the rules and since she wasn't licensed as a manager, they wouldn't let her anywhere near ringside. 


For those of you who are subscribers to Matwatch, Steve Beverly's publication, he had a computer disaster 
regarding his mailing list so please contact him and let him know how many issues you have remaining on 
your subscription. 
regarding his mailing list so please contact him and let him know how many issues you have remaining on 
your subscription. 

AAA 

The return to Juan de la Barrera Gym in Mexico City drew a sellout 10,600 fans on 7/15 with Los Hermanos 
Dinamita & La Parka beating Konnan & Lizmark & Perro Aguayo & Mascara Sagrada on top. Reportedly they 
turned 5,000 fans away at the door for this show. The show aired in Mexico on 7/17, which is a quicker-
than usual turnaround for this group. 

Apparently there was a major office robbery this past week. Don't know all the details but Pena received a 
phone call threatening his life and a warning not to be in the office one day. He went anyway, and five 
gunmen showed up and pistol-whipped one of the employees and stole $15,000 in cash, a lot of personal 
jewelry of those in the office and destroyed the fax machine. There are no leads or suspects in the case. 

Unlike some of the previous U.S. shows, the New York and Chicago cards were very well publicized with 
ads the last few weeks going into the show on Galavision. However, ads for Chicago were still airing late 
Saturday night on the Galavision movie, after the show was half-over. 

Fabuloso Blondy, who is returning, did an interview in the mags saying he was going to form a tag team 
with Black Magic, who is still an EMLL headliner. 

AAA announced they would only run three more dates at Juan de la Barrera Gym for the rest of the year, 
two in August and one in October, due to the building being booked so heavily on Fridays, which is the 
traditional best drawing wrestling night in Mexico City. 

There was a lot of mainstream news pub on the tour this weekend including a live remote from Chicago 
showing the wrestlers getting off the airplane and an interview with Heavy Metal. 

Galavision this weekend aired the 7/8 Tijuana card, featuring a great Rey Misterio vs. Jerry Estrada match. 

WCW 

With the strong buy rate, expect Hulk Hogan and Jimmy Hart's influence on the product to increase. Jim 
Duggan, for example, debuted at the 7/19 Center Stage tapings (although one report said his matches were 
only taped for European television). Brutus Beefcake and Brian Blair appeared with Hogan in the post-match 
celebration although at this point there is no indication they are coming in. Highlight of the taping was a 

27:00 **** match with Ric Flair & Steve Austin beating Sting & Rick Steamboat which should air on 7/31. 
Sherri of course interfered freely. Finish saw Steamboat and Austin as the legal men. Sting gave Flair the 
Stinger splash and put him in the scorpion. Sherri climbed to the top rope while Flair rolls to the floor. Sting 
then press-slammed Sherri and threw her over the top rope onto Flair. Flair didn't make a very good catch, 
either. While all this was going on, Austin scored a pin on Steamboat using the trunks. Bunkhouse Buck & 
Arn Anderson worked as a tag team managed by Rob Parker with Meng at ringside. After the match Meng 
attacked jobber Frankie Lancaster. 
The 7/25 syndicated taping in Macon, GA saw them shoot an angle with Dusty Rhodes. Bunkhouse Buck 
was doing a squash when Dusty slowly came to the ring with Buck not noticing. Rhodes tapped Buck on the 
shoulder and gave him an elbow, then started giving Rob Parker the elbows. At that point, Terry Funk and 
Arn Anderson hit the ring but Rick Steamboat and Dustin (arm in a cast, selling the "broken arm" angle) 
came out. 

They'll be doing the 8/6 and 8/7 TBS shows live from Disney in Orlando. On 8/6 they'll have another 
"interactive" match which judging from the line-up looks to be either Steamboat vs. Austin or Vader vs. 
Guardian Angel. The 7/9 live show did a 2.6 rating, which is about .7 higher than they had been averaging 
so the plan looks to be to do one live Saturday show each month. 


For the weekend of 7/9-10, WCW Saturday live did a 2.6 (which, considering it had a Flair-Sting match, is 
not nearly as impressive as it sounds since last summer when rating were weak they did a Flair-Sting match 
on a Saturday show which did a 3.4), Main Event a 1.8 and Pro a 1.3. For the weekend of 7/16-17 saw 
Saturday do a 2.1, Main Event a 1.8 and Pro an 0.8. For the weekend of 7/23-24, after the PPV with the 
title change, ratings were substantially up with the 7/24 Main Event show headlined by a Flair-Steamboat 
match doing a 2.5 which is the best Sunday rating in a long time. 
not nearly as impressive as it sounds since last summer when rating were weak they did a Flair-Sting match 
on a Saturday show which did a 3.4), Main Event a 1.8 and Pro a 1.3. For the weekend of 7/16-17 saw 
Saturday do a 2.1, Main Event a 1.8 and Pro an 0.8. For the weekend of 7/23-24, after the PPV with the 
title change, ratings were substantially up with the 7/24 Main Event show headlined by a Flair-Steamboat 
match doing a 2.5 which is the best Sunday rating in a long time. 

Jesse Ventura was complaining to anyone who would listen about his treatment. Ventura cited that the 
Saturday ratings have continually dropped since he was replaced by Bobby Heenan (true, but that is more a 
result of seasonal variation than related to who the answer is) and was upset that nobody in the company 
gave him any lead time in knowing what role he'd play on the PPV. When Ventura was out there during the 
second match, he seemed to not turn off his bad mood even when the camera was on. By the way, 
Ventura has decided not to run for the U.S. Senate. 

Jimmy Hart is apparently trying to get his friend Honkytonk Man in. 

Apparently those in charge realize what the rest of us have about Michael Buffer and they'll use him for as 
long as they've already committed to but don't expect him to be permanent. 

WCW canceled 7/31 in Miami Beach because advance sales were like two dozen. House show business past 
two weeks has seen El Paso on 7/14 drew about 950, Albuquerque the next day to about 1,200 (both of 
these were sold shows), Little Rock on 7/22 did nearly 2,000 while Tupelo, MS on 7/23 did more than 3,000 
fans and $28,000. Tupelo is by far WCW's strongest market (they run casino shows that are apparently well 
publicized since the first one a few months back drew more than 6,000. 

Company sent out press releases and an accompanying photo to the media of Hogan & Hart with the 
caption reading "Hulk Hogan & Jimmy Cliff." 

At the Orlando PPV, about 90% of the souvenirs being for sale in the building were of Hogan. The Orlando 
Sentinel, which did several major stories before and after the card, noted that and asked a vendor why in 
particular there wasn't any Flair merchandise and the vendor said that nobody wants to buy anything of 
Flair. 

WWF 

The beginnings of the Bob Backlund turn will start airing this coming weekend when they air Backlund 
attacking Bret Hart after losing to him in the WWF title match in syndication. 

Also, they didn't jump the gun on the Undertaker vs. Undertaker announcement, but instead are doing a bit 
where Leslie Neilsen of Naked Gun movie fame is playing a detective trying to get to the bottom of the 
story. 

Titan made a major play to raid Konnan since the AAA shows have proven to have some drawing power in 
New York and Chicago, but apparently Konnan is staying with AAA after all. He's got 18 months left on his 
AAA contract with Televisa. 

Monday Night Raw on 7/11 (Bret Hart vs. 1-2-3 Kid) did a 3.0 rating, while All-American did a 1.9 and 
Mania a 1.1 that weekend. The following weekend saw Raw do a 3.1 (Ramon vs. Diesel for IC title), All-
American 2.0 and Mania 1.3. 

The last European tour saw the Germany shows do mostly full houses again, the Czechoslovakia show was 
canceled with no advance and some of the other shows drew 500 to 1,000. WWF was also in the 
Philippines in recent weeks and ran mainly small-town shows in the U.S. 

Raw on 8/1 will be live from Youngstown, OH with Shawn Michaels vs. Razor Ramon and Alundra Blayze 
defending the womens title against Bull Nakano. On TV they built up Nakano as 5-10, 250 (she's more like 
5-5 but if she sticks her hair straight up she'll look taller, although she may be 200 pounds). Nakano debuts 


on 7/28 in Moncton, New Brunswick. 


Expect an acknowledgement to be made on television regarding the death of Joey Marella in a week or two, 
because matches he was refereeing were still airing as of this weekend. 
The Piper sound-a-like at the PPV is Pat O'Neil from North Weymouth, MA. Reportedly he was paid $2,000 


for his part in the match. 


The WWF Magazine on the newsstands did an article that did a major burial job on Hogan, mentioning his 
age and saying how he went with another organization where the talent is mainly past their prime, etc. 
Brian Lee started on the road this past weekend as The Undertaker, beating Sparky Plugg in a number of 


cities. 
Heavenly Bodies returned as Jimmy Del Rey is back from his injury
__________________

3 NBA Champion (1981, 1984, 1986)
3 NBA Most Valuable Player (19841986)
12 NBA All-Star (19801988, 19901992)
2 NBA Finals MVP (1984, 1986)
9 All-NBA First Team (19801988)
All-NBA Second Team (1990)
3 NBA All-Defensive Second Team (19821984)
NBA Rookie of the Year (1980)
NBA All-Rookie First Team (1980)
NBA All-Star Game MVP (1982)
3 Three-point Shootout champion (19861988)
21,791 Points
5,695 Assists
8,974 Rebounds
NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

33 Larry "Legend" Bird

Dave Meltzer > You

Follow Me On Twitter:@AirJordanFan93

Last edited by Clique : 09-09-2012 at 02:54 PM. Reason: put article in spoiler tags
666_The_Game_666 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2012, 04:54 PM   #177 (permalink)
Learning to break kayfabe
 
Zombies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 53
Zombies 50 - 100
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Quote:
Originally Posted by tlk23 View Post
September 26th, 1988

Booking: Anyone can sit back and write a dozen new scenarios, some of which would work and some of which wouldn't work and until they are tried, nobody knows for sure. Titan has bombs, too. Nobody comes close to 100% on angles. The head booker probably shouldn't wrestle because we've seen the danger that causes. They should, however, be very receptive to all ideas from the wrestlers and wrestlers should be encouraged to help put together their own programs, provided these programs are going in the same general direction as the booker has planned. Don't fight the fans. If the fans like someone, even though you encourage the fans not to, than take advantage of the charisma of the wrestler. If a wrestler is getting over without a push (case in point, Sting), don't hold them back simply because another guy who isn't getting over as well was in your original plans. Recognize when an act is stale and do something about it. Everyone knows the Road Warriors are stale and it isn't entirely Rhodes' fault, but it is his fault to allow them to get as stale as they have gotten. The loss of Blanchard & Anderson should be used to your advantage. After the shows already booked through the early part of October are done, put Midnight Express vs. Flair & Windham and have them vow to eliminate the entire horseman clan. Have the Warriors attack Sting, who is the only wrestler popular enough to make a Road Warrior turn effective, and a Warriors vs. Sting & Luger feud for the short term could cause a spark. Any turn of Flair should be postponed for a while. There have been too many turns already, however the Roadie turn seems to be a necessity so they quit floundering in prelims plus killer heels are desperately needed. Create a legitimate junior heavyweight division. The idea that jr. heavies don't draw money has been reinforced by pushing glorified jobbers like Nelson Royal and Denny Brown as World champions of that division for years. To get the division 'over', you will need an outstanding and charismatic wrestler to be the focal point, and a charismatic opponent to help him get over. Don't allow the top jr. heavies to be jobbers for the heavies, in fact, they should hold their own and when they have to lose, do it in such a way where they've got the guy on the road and on the verge of losing type of a story. While a World champion vs. junior champion match (which the heavyweight champ would win after a bitter struggle) might not sellout a house show, or be appropriate for a PPV megacard, it would make one great prime-time special main event which can go 25-30 minutes and get both wrestlers over. Scout the talent in the smaller groups and make changes when necessary. Sometime soon, change the NWA champion, and my suggestion is to give it to Sting and let him run with it and find a killer heel (Vader? Bigelow? Hansen?) for a short run while at the same time grooming Flair/Windham for subsequent bouts. Do you realize for all real purposes, Flair will have been champion for seven years by the time you read this? Yes, he is the greatest of this era, and maybe any era, but that is too long. Give Sting the opportunity to see just how far he can go with the right push. And don't forget, Flair has always been tremendous in the role of the totally obsessed challenger. The only reason it didn't draw last year is because they made a horrendous pick as champion. Don't repeat finishes in the same arena. If I had my way, there wouldn't be a referee bump for another six months. It's been done so often it's become a cliche. And don't think all those screw job endings in the Carolinas haven't had an effect on the gate. They won't affect the cities you run less frequently because the endings aren't repeated enough for fans to get wise and turned off by them, but I look at those ref bump/false finish endings at just about every Greensboro card and see how drastically the gates have declined and can't help but feel there is a correlation. Encourage fans to think. If they spend any kind of time thinking about the product, it becomes easy to hook them and they become the most consistent and loyal customers."

Words of wisdom...Words of wisdom...
__________________
Best WrestleMania matches of all time:
1.Ricky Steamboat vs Randy Savage III
2.Shawn Michaels vs Bret Hart XII
3.Bret Hart vs Steve Austin XIII
4.The Undertaker vs Shawn Michaels XXV
5.Owen Hart vs Bret Hart X
6.Razor Ramon vs Shawn Michaels X
7.Hulk Hogan vs Randy Savage V
8.Steve Austin vs The Rock XVII
9.The Undertaker vs Shawn Michaels XXVI
10.Brock Lesnar vs Kurt Angle XIX
11.The Ultimate Warrior vs Hulk Hogan VI
12.Edge & Christian vs The Hardy Boys vs The Dudley Boys XVII
13.The Rock vs Hulk Hogan XVIII
14.Kurt Angle vs Shawn Michaels XXI
15.Chris Benoit vs HHH vs Shawn Michaels XX
16.Bret Hart vs Roddy Piper VIII
17.Shawn Michaels vs Chris Jericho XIX
18.Hulk Hogan vs Andre The Giant III
19.Randy Savage vs Ric Flair VIII
20.Shawn Michaels vs Ric Flair XXIV
Zombies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2012, 08:10 PM   #178 (permalink)
SUPERPOWER
 
Clique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 17,962
Clique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on repClique whored out on rep
Post Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Thanks vivalabrave for showing me this article. This is from a recent newsletter but it's very extensive on the history of Monday Night Raw and wrestling on cable TV as a whole really.


Spoiler for History of Raw:

With 1,000 episodes now under its belt, Monday Night Raw may not be the longest running weekly episodic television show in history as it claims, but it can call itself the most noteworthy television wrestling show ever in the United States.

A lot has changed, more than just postage and gas prices, since January 11, 1993. That night, the former two-hour Prime Time Wrestling show on the USA Network, featuring Bobby Heenan and Gorilla Monsoon in studio pitching to arena matches, was replaced by a new concept show. Ratings for Prime Time Wrestling had fallen down to the mid-2s each week. That new show was called Monday Night Raw.

The original Raw was a weekly one hour show that aired live, at least some weeks, from the Manhattan Center, which held 1,100 people at the time, a small building that was a short walk away from Madison Square Garden. The building later became the home of Ring of Honor major shows in the market.

Raw was not the immediate flagship show, although it was given a big promotional push as a new form of wrestling show because it was live. Prior to that time, WWF had rarely done live television shows, although when they did, such as the Royal Rumble from Hamilton, ONT, in 1988, or the MTV specials with Wendi Richter vs. Fabulous Moolah in 1984 and Hulk Hogan vs. Roddy Piper in 1985, they had been spectacular successes. The only regular live wrestling programming on a national basis were PPV shows, and WCW’s Clash of the Champions specials.

But the idea of live weekly programming was hardly revolutionary or innovative. While most pro wrestling shows were taped, Memphis Wrestling, which in many ways can be called the predecessor to Raw where the matches themselves were secondary to the soap opera and character development, aired live in its home market for 90 minutes on Saturday mornings for decades. A few years before Raw, Jim Herd, who was running WCW, tried to push the idea of making the Saturday night show live, thinking it would boost ratings. But he couldn’t push it through both because of the expense, and also because it would lead to having to cancel the Saturday night house shows. Even though WCW was not profitable on the road, most in the business were still in the mindset that it made its money on house shows, which was correct because at the time the WCW company received no money for television rights. Saturday night was the best night to draw. Also, Herd’s experiment of moving the show back an hour, from 7:05 p.m. to 9:05 p.m., with the idea that both hours would be prime time that he came up with ended up as a ratings disappointment, and the show moved back to its long-standing traditional 6:05 p.m. time slot.

In that era, the weekly cable broadcasts of wrestling were the adjunct to the more important shows, which were the syndicated shows. WWE syndicated shows went through various names, with WWE Superstars being the “A” show. That’s where the main angles took place, and that’s where the localized interviews that sold the arena shows were inserted into each market. The idea is the national cable exposure made wrestlers into stars, but it was the syndicated show, in each market, with the wrestlers talking about their upcoming matches and making references to the local market, that sold the matches, and that was were where the money was made.

But within a few years after Raw’s debut, the business of syndicating wrestling shows was dying. Wrestling companies paying local stations to air their programming was believed to have dated back to the 1950s and Jim Barnett. When Sam Muchnick headed the NWA, he frowned on the concept, feeling it was a slippery slope that would lead to long-term trouble for the industry.

In that era, Sunday mornings on independent stations were dominated by religious shows, where the church paid for the time and in exchange used the time to promote donations. The feeling was, if the television industry viewed the wrestling show as an early form of what is now called an infomercial, that they would realize how badly the promoters needed them for their business. In most places, the local wrestling show did good ratings, and in many places where wrestling was a big part of the local culture or sports scene, it did amazing ratings.

Everyone’s deal was different. In some places, the promoter supplied a tape for free and the station would make money by selling the ad time. In others, the station was also cut in on a percentage of the revenue from the house shows in the city that the show was promoting, which encouraged stations to carry wrestling even if it was hard to get advertisers. Some stations, for whom wrestling was their most popular local show, paid for the production of the show and in some Southern markets, wrestling and the local news were the most profitable programming in the market. In places where that was the case, where the wrestling franchise was valuable locally and multiple stations wanted the show, promoters were able to work out a deal where they were paid a rights fee. But those were the exceptions to the rule, and the money was nothing like television brings today.

What made Raw the most important wrestling television show was a combination of things. The first was actually started by Vince McMahon. In 1983 and 1984, when McMahon expanded his World Wrestling Federation from being the Northeast regional promotion that his father turned into a local institution, to go national, every city of any size had its local form of wrestling. McMahon’s goal was to hire the area’s biggest stars, add them to his roster of Northeastern stars, complete with Andre the Giant, who had been wrestling’s biggest touring attraction for a decade, and then run shows in that area with the stars the fans were used to seeing.

The second part of the plan was to go to the station that broadcasted the local wrestling, and offer money to the station to buy the time slot. McMahon not only would provide a higher caliber of stars and better television production than most (but not all) promotions of that time, but instead of the barter deals, he’d pay the station for the air time. In strong wrestling markets, he was willing to pay upwards of $2,000 per week.

Immediately, the word in television was what Muchnick feared would happen when Barnett did the same thing in the 50s, that wrestling programming should be treated like religious programming, and the promoters were willing to spend money for it. The prices for air time increased greatly in the 80s, a market like New York was charging $10,000 per week for air time, which is one of the reasons, along with not being able to compete with the star power provided by both McMahon and Jim Crockett Jr., for their deaths. In reality, key reasons for the deaths of not only Mid South Wrestling, but later Jim Crockett Promotions, and in the 90s, Smoky Mountain Wrestling and ECW, and the money losses by WCW (and for that matter WWF when their house show business started falling in the 90s) were the rising costs of securing television because wrestling, no matter the ratings, was having to compete with infomercials to buy open time slots that were up for sale, and ratings became less important than how much someone was willing to pay for the hour.

Inevitably, the territorial system was going to fail because the public was only going to support at a high level either one or two wrestling brands and whoever had the national cable outlet and produced the strongest product was going to make the local promotion look second rate. Jerry Jarrett was able to keep the Memphis territory afloat until 1997, but in the end, even with the combination of him being paid by the local station instead of the other way around, based on wrestling’s long history of ratings in Memphis, and paying talent $25 per night, eventually the lack of paying spectators to the show led to the profits dwindling and eventually becoming red ink. Jarrett and co-owner Jerry Lawler were able to sell the territory for $1 million in cash right before its death, leaving outside investors holding the bag.

Another reason Raw became so popular was the expansion of cable. By the late 90s, more than half the U.S. homes were wired and could get stations like USA, TNT and TBS. And the biggest reason of all was the Monday Night Wars, which led to a boom in interest in pro wrestling.

When Ted Turner went to Eric Bischoff in 1995 and asked him why Vince McMahon’s ratings on Monday night were now ahead of their Saturday night ratings, Bischoff told him it was because Monday was a better night and because Raw was sometimes live. Turner then told him that TNT would clear an hour for him every Monday night and he would go live. The feeling in wrestling at the time is that there were a certain number of wrestling fans, and with the shows going head-to-head, it would divide the audience. Instead of a reasonably well rated Raw, which was doing between a 2.5 and 3.0 rating (remember, it was not the primary show at the time; Superstars, usually syndicated in various time slots on the weekends was), you’d have two shows splitting the audience and not doing very well and the result would be a perception wrestling programming wasn’t strong. But the opposite happened. Raw was definitely hurt at first by Nitro, but instead of splitting the overall wrestling audience, the audience grew. Raw did well with younger viewers, kids and teenagers. Nitro, through using so many of the stars from the 80s on top, brought back an older fan base that was not watching on Monday nights.

Raw’s numbers dropped 15-20% right away, but from the start, the overall audience grew about 60%. It wasn’t long before the overall audience doubled and eventually tripled. Raw didn’t get back to its old numbers until 1998, but at that point, with wrestling so big on Mondays and Raw delivering the better product, the numbers skyrocketed. In 1995, although Raw had been on the air for three years and WWF had a Monday night presence dating back many years before that, to most people, wrestling was something you watched on Saturdays or Sundays, either morning, afternoon, or evening, depending on the city you lived in. Very quickly, Monday became wrestling night, a tradition that has remained for a generation.

At the peak of the wars in 1998, the differences in the audience were noteworthy. The median age of a Raw viewer ranged between 23 and 25, which means half the viewers were older and half were younger. That was a remarkably low skewing number for a prime time television show. Moreover, as Raw got more risque and popular, they picked up so many young viewers that even when picking up disgruntled Nitro viewers starting in late 1998, and more in 1999, they got as high as 39% of the audience being 17 or under (right now it’s about half that). The ratings for kids and teenagers were among the highest shows, network or otherwise, on television. Nitro’s median audience during the peak period was 32, but as time went on and they lost the younger viewers when Raw became the hot show, it’s remaining viewers skewed older, hovering closer to 40. Their older audience stuck with it through the bad times while the younger audience either switched to Raw, or many gave up on watching wrestling. That older audience for the most part ceased being fans of wrestling over the last two years of Nitro, and those remaining in 2001 almost all gave up during that year and never came back. The death of WCW immediately cut the over 40 audience watching wrestling down by 35% almost immediately, and that audience never came back.

What is notable is that today, Raw’s median audience ranges weekly from 38 to 40 (although this past week, notable because it was a nostalgia show that should have skewed older, it actually skewed younger because of the influx of teenage boys).

The irony is the show is written today to aim younger than the previous boom period, yet the actual audience is significantly older, even than the Nitro audience. Yet, if you go to the live events, kids are more prevalent, meaning that unless you go to a Raw taping or a PPV show, where a lot more people in their 20s and 30s attend, the aim low works to draw smaller crowds and missing out on the largest block of TV viewers. And that isn’t the case for any other sport-like activity.

It was Bischoff, not McMahon, who deserves credit, for making Monday night into wrestling night. Before 1995, there was a wrestling show on Monday night, no different than on Saturdays and Sundays. Very quickly after the debut of Nitro, Monday night became wrestling night, which it still is to this day.

Raw was still a standard wrestling television show, with a few exceptions. They did a few things, like the ring card girl, taken from boxing, in the early years and some comedy segments and skits. At one point Michael Hayes used the name Dok Hendrix and they had a band playing between matches. But it was still stars beating non-stars, usually with a competitive main event.

When Bischoff started Nitro, the philosophy was different. Nitro would be based on stars vs. stars. Dream matches of the era, like Hulk Hogan vs. Sting or Hogan vs. Lex Luger, that would be saved for PPV, were instead made Nitro main events because Bischoff was the newcomer whose goal became winning the ratings war. It became an ego thing. The truth was, WWF had historically rarely worried that much about ratings. It was all about house show attendance, PPV purchases and merchandise sales. Television was just the vehicle to drive those revenue streams. If in a certain market, WWF was drawing lower ratings than another promotion, and that wasn’t unheard of, it didn’t matter because the local promotion was inevitably going to lose ground over time based on losing talent. And bad ratings, which really weren’t the case in most places, often didn’t affect things since they were paying for the time. And even if they got canceled by stations due to ratings, there was always another station in town ready to take the money.

But WCW made Nitro the focal point of the company, and not the house shows or even the PPV shows. Nitro started beating Raw in the ratings, and eventually, WWF had to respond.

There is a laundry list of reasons why Raw ultimately Nitro, when it started the other way around. Nitro was fresher, brought in new talent and new styles. And they mixed old stars with new stars with the strongest roster any promotion in wrestling history ever had. There was something for everyone. Larger-than-life personas, an all-star cast of the best of WWF stars from its early glory days like Hulk Hogan, Roddy Piper and Randy Savage, WCW’s stars from years earlier like Sting, Lex Luger and Ric Flair, and a huge key was importing Kevin Nash and Scott Hall from WWF. Underneath, they brought in talent from Japan and Mexico that would tear the house down. WWF was behind the times, with its big guys wrestling a slow style and Vince McMahon’s mindset that older people on top wouldn’t draw.

But in 1997, WWF switched Raw into where the matches didn’t matter, and they had skits, and the landmark U.S. vs. Canada feud, while not initially paying great dividends in ratings, saw house show business pick up. Ironically, what turned WWF’s finances around was a business decision on PPV.

McMahon and a few boxing promoters were the only people to have strong success in PPV in the 80s, when people thought it would change sports. McMahon, like the boxing promoters, felt you had to have a special attraction, or PPV wouldn’t work. WCW got into the PPV game, but was always behind WWF, until 1994, when they signed Hulk Hogan. McMahon felt Hogan, who was about to turn 39 in 1993 when McMahon wanted him to put over Bret Hart at SummerSlam and make a new champion, was past his prime as the focal point of the company. He wanted to keep him around in a similar role that Bruno Sammartino had for his father after Sammartino gave up the title in 1977. He’d be the legend brought back a few times a year and would always be protected in his role. Hogan had moved on to New Japan Pro Wrestling, which was paying him big money for minimal dates, and filming a television show called “Thunder in Paradise.”

While WWE history said Ted Turner’s checkbook took Hogan from WWE to WCW, the reality was different. Hogan gave notice to WWE in the summer of 1993, putting over Yokozuna rather than Hart. He was working major shows in Japan when Eric Bischoff, with help from Ric Flair, talked him into coming to WCW, where he started in the summer of 1994.

WCW gave Hogan the chance to be the old Hogan. While he never came close to the popularity he had during his WWF heyday, Hogan had been the guy on top of all the successful WWF PPV shows, and immediately, Hogan’s drawing power was such that WCW’s PPVs, when Hogan had the right opponent, like Flair, Savage or Vader, would beat WWF’s numbers. WCW expanded its number of PPVs and soon was doing one a month. McMahon did the same thing, but felt threatened he’d ruin his big attraction shows like WrestleMania and SummerSlam, so he did secondary shows called “In Your House,” two hour for $14.95. But when WCW continued to have success at $24.95 going monthly, McMahon followed suit. McMahon’s PPV numbers charging $24.95 increased greatly, both in volume and of course revenue, from when he charged $14.95, and the company started being profitable.

During the heyday of the Monday Night Wars, about 10 million people would watch wrestling on Monday nights. Keep in mind that at that time there were also only 75 million homes wired for cable, as compared to just under 100 million today. There were weeks in when Raw was on fire that more than 11 million people would watch wrestling on Mondays, and wrestling was so strong that it legitimately hurt the ratings of ABC’s Monday Night Football starting with the 1998 season.

As for syndication, because so many people were watching on cable and wrestling was so hot, neither WWF nor WCW needed local syndication, although they did maintain it in many markets. In those days, wrestling would come to town and the demand for tickets got higher and higher. WCW peaked in 1998, although the seeds for the decline, a combination of a complete lack of understanding of what its audience wanted from a wrestling TV show and not making new stars, was already establishing chinks in the foundation. Things would have declined more, as Raw had taken over as the top show due to momentum started with a Steve Austin vs. Mike Tyson angle that saw WrestleMania numbers triple 1997 levels (237,000 buys to 730,000 buys), and led to the landmark Austin vs. McMahon program. But WCW was able to have its best year at the gate and on PPV due to the emergence of Bill Goldberg. After ending Goldberg’s winning streak and doing things like the infamous one-finger touch title change (which would have no negative effect today but was a killer back then), and the miscue of making fun of the taped WWF Raw where Mick Foley won the title, and WCW went down hard in 1999 while WWF had the best year in its history.

Raw ratings declined from their peak when adding a second weekly show, Smackdown. Being on network television, Smackdown actually had more viewers than Raw for a time, although it always drew lower ratings than Raw. While Raw’s ratings peaked in 1999, attendance and popularity continued to expand through 2000. In late 2000, there were signs that the peak was over, and the fall came after WrestleMania in 2001, based on the heel turn of Austin and a number of other factors. The death of WCW eliminated competition head-to-head, even though WCW had really ceased to be competition in 1999. And the show experienced a slow but steady decline in ratings and PPV, although the emergence of new top headliners like John Cena, Batista and others did lead to attendance at live events increasing from a bottoming out period about seven years ago.

With the exception of Vince McMahon and Executive Producer Kevin Dunn, there have actually been no fixtures through the 19 plus year history of the show. The person who has appeared on the most broadcasts would be Jerry Lawler, who started out doing “The King’s Court,” an interview segment on the earliest episodes of Raw.

It’s been so long that most people remember Lawler as the show’s original announcer. In actuality, on the first 13 weeks, the announcers were Vince McMahon, Randy Savage and a comedian named Rob Bartlett. Bartlett was almost an immediate flop in the role, as his comedy didn’t fit well into a wrestling show, and on April 26, 1993, he was replaced as the resident comedian by Bobby Heenan. Heenan remained in the position until the end of 1993 when he was dropped by the company, which was losing money, because of his high contract, and went to WCW, where Heenan, Tony Schiavone, Mike Tenay and Larry Zbyszko were the voices of Nitro during its heyday.

Lawler started as a heel interviewer, who was often involved in angles, his biggest being with Bret Hart, one of the top babyfaces of that period. The feud stemmed from Hart winning the King of the Ring PPV in 1993, while Lawler had long been known as the King of Wrestling dating back to Bobby Shane letting him have his gimmick when Shane left the U.S. for Australia in the 70s.

But Lawler has been with the show for most of its 19 years. He was gone for about one year when he was facing sexual charges with a minor in Louisville. WWF fired him when the charges went public, in 1993. The charges were dropped when the girl recanted her story, and Lawler plea bargained down to a minor witness tampering misdemeanor offense. At that point Lawler was brought back to WWF.

Lawler started as an announcer on April 10, 1995, working with McMahon. Randy Savage was actually the first wrestler who was a color commentator on the show, starting in week one and lasting until the Halloween show of 1994, at which point he left to go to WCW. Shawn Michaels and Jim Cornette were in the roles before Lawler, who has been a fixture in that chair with the exception of a few months in 1998 and 1999 when the announcing chair revolved, and a nine month period in 2001 when he quit the company over a decision to fire his wife, Stacy Carter, who had been a female performer. Lawler left out of loyalty, and was replaced by Paul Heyman. Several attempts were made to bring Lawler back, but they all fell through because he insisted on his wife also being hired back. What led to Lawler’s return were two things. The first was Lawler had signed a contract with the XWF, a new promotion that the WWF was intent on raiding. The second was Carter left Lawler, so there was no hold up of insisting his wife gets her job back to keep him from finalizing his deal.

Lawler’s best remembered partner was Jim Ross. Ross had been the voice of Mid South Wrestling during its heyday, and had personally negotiated the sale of the company to Crockett. He was working with WCW, and a decision was made to take him off the air as the lead announcer, largely a political move because of his affiliation with Bill Watts’ failed regime in charge of the company. Ross found a contract loophole and jumped to WWF amid big fanfare, but his love/hate relationship with McMahon started early. Ross was fired after contracting Bell’s Palsy with the feeling someone who looked like him couldn’t be on television. WCW had no interest in taking him back and his career in wrestling seemed over, as he was limited to being the voice of Smoky Mountain Wrestling, which was more of a favor to Jim Cornette than a job he could make any real money at. Then, out of the blue, he wound up talking his way back in, working with McMahon as a booker, eventually becoming head of talent relations and being put back on the air.

The unique McMahon/Ross relationship can be seen based on the history of Raw announcers. After being fired the first time, McMahon brought Ross back in the summer of 1994, since McMahon was involved in a federal trial on steroid distribution charges (the distribution charges were dropped due to a venue issue and a weak case; McMahon was acquitted of charges that he was in a conspiracy with Pennsylvania doctor George Zahorian to distribute steroids to his wrestlers). After McMahon was acquitted, Ross was fired from the company a second time.

Ross became a regular host on August 5, 1996, working with Lawler and McMahon. McMahon left the booth after the 1997 Survivor Series for a number of reasons, because he had become so unpopular in the wake of screwing Bret Hart that it wouldn’t be wise for him to be the lead announcer. This led to transforming into the strongest heel in company history in the feud with Austin. Shortly after the Survivor Series in 1997, the three-man team was Ross, Michael Cole and current ROH announcer Kevin Kelly. Ross suffered another bout with Bell’s Palsy in late 1998 but returned after WrestleMania in 1999.

Ross was replaced in 2005 on the move from Spike back to USA. WWE has secretly negotiated a deal with Mike Goldberg, who was the voice of the UFC. On the week that Raw moved from Spike back to USA, Spike countered with a live UFC special. McMahon made a lucrative offer to Goldberg, which would have made him the highest paid announcer WWE ever had, plus a bonus if he would have no-showed the UFC live event and appeared on Raw that night with no warning. UFC was nowhere near the level of company it would be a year later. However, Goldberg, who was really not a wrestling fan although he did watch the Hulk Hogan AWA era wrestling when living in Minneapolis, got a sizeable raise from UFC to stay. He thought going to WWE could hurt his career in broadcasting real sports, went back-and-forth during the week but eventually changed his mind on the offer. The funny part of the deal is that Goldberg had hoped he would be able to use a stage name as a WWE announcer, thinking it would hurt him long-term when it came to being a sports announcer. McMahon, not knowing any of this, also wanted Goldberg to use a stage name, because at the time, McMahon was still bitter about Bill Goldberg. Goldberg’s pulling out led to Ross getting a few more weeks before he was replaced by current ESPN anchor Jonathan Coachman. Ross also suffered serious health issues during that period. Coachman was later phased out in favor of former ECW announcer Joey Styles, and after Ross was brought back for the 2006 WrestleMania, a month later he replaced Styles in his final run as lead announcer. He was moved to Smackdown in the 2008 draft. Aside from a few month run in 2011 as part of a storyline to get HHH over as a babyface and then being fired to get John Laurinaitis over as a heel, he’s done spot duty on rare occasions, usually for a match or two, like this past week, on nostalgia based shows.

Raw started as a one hour show. Since leaving Allentown and Hamburg with the national expansion, WWF had been taping its television in major arenas. They would tape a few shows on one night, with the first hour airing live and the remaining hours airing in successive weeks. They taped in cycles, where they would do several week long storylines starting with the live show and building to climax on the final show of the taping. Because of climaxing the storylines on the show the week before the next live taping, it was the taped shows that usually drew the highest ratings.

The impression was always given that the show was live, even though much of the time that wasn’t the case. Where the show differed from the syndicated shows was there was more comedy involved, and the syndicated format was squash matches. Raw had squash matches at first, but most shows also had a main event, and built storylines week-to-week for television, which had been done in syndication, but not as frequently.

Ratings immediately increased from what Prime Time Wrestling was doing. During the pre-Nitro period would range from the high 2s to the mid-3s. But in its early years, seeing Raw live was not a hot ticket. It didn’t take long before, even with papering, they couldn’t come close to filling the Manhattan Center for tapings, and started at first going on the road to small Northeast arenas, looking for places that had capacities of 3,000 or so. That’s why, even to this day, the city that has hosted the second most episodes of Raw is Poughkeepsie, NY, a city Raw outgrew 14 years ago.

The greatest thing, in hindsight, that happened to the show was the Monday Night Wars. WCW debuted Nitro in September, 1995, and one-hour versions of each show went head-to-head, with the ratings lead going back-and-forth. Nitro went live every week. During the first several months, the ratings went back-and-forth. Raw had the edge, in the sense that Nitro had to deliver significantly stronger main events with bigger names to win the week.

In 1996, the ante was upped. Nitro went to two hours, and with the NWO angle, beat Raw every week, and by 1997, usually by a large margin. Raw went to two hours in February, 1997, and creatively started taking off a few months later. Many will remember 1997 as the year Raw really broke out, with the Steve Austin vs. Bret Hart feud where Austin was the babyface in the U.S. and Hart was the babyface in Canada. It lost the ratings every week, usually by a wide margin. With WWF losing millions, McMahon made the move to get rid of Hart, his highest paid wrestler (McMahon had signed Hart to an unheard of 20-year contract in 1996 to keep Hart from signing a three-year deal at $2.8 million per year with WCW–the type of money only Hulk Hogan made in those days. But the company was losing money and McMahon attempted to get Hart to agree to defer his contract payments, and when Hart turned that down, McMahon gave him the option to leave and see if WCW was still interested in giving him the deal. That led to the 1997 Survivor Series, and the birth of the heel Mr. McMahon character.

The relationship lasted five years, during which ratings fell significantly. While WCW had its best year ever in 1998, the WWF business turned around that year. There were a number of reasons, the biggest being the ascension of Austin. Austin really started showing signs of being a major drawing card in late 1997, as there was a late year rise in business after he returned from a major neck injury which threatened to end his career, and eventually did shorten his career. But the interplay with McMahon and the rise of The Rock and DX led to the golden era of the promotion, which lasted through WrestleMania of 2001, and ended when Austin was turned heel.

In 1998, Raw was still only going live every other week. When business was booming in September 1999, they made the call to be a live weekly show, a status that has remained unchanged. A year later, the show became a major money generator, as a contract signed with TNN, The National Network (which is now Spike TV), increased the annual rights fee for Raw from $5.5 million that USA was paying to $28 million, plus WWF also controlled a percentage of the ad revenue for the show. Raw, the highest rated show on cable television, was by itself strong enough to make TNN from an also-ran network with an 0.7 prime time ratings average into a borderline top ten network.

The relationship lasted five years, a period where ratings fell consistently. A combination of the frustration of blaming being on a weaker network and Bonnie Hammer getting control of USA Network and wanting wrestling back led to the 2005 move back. As it turned out, it was the show, not the network, since ratings continued to fall with the move back. Plus, when Spike saw the handwriting on the wall in 2005, they announced they were canceling Raw, something of a face saving move. But with no leverage, WWF got a worse deal from USA to move than they were getting from Spike, getting the same $28 million per year licensing fee, but WWF with its new deal no longer shared in the ad revenue.

Still, Raw is a solid consistent performer. While it is no longer the highest rated show on cable, it still runs first run episodes 52 weeks a year, something no other highly rated show does. The scripted high rated dramas and reality shows on cable run short seasons. Sports are also seasonal.

The company got a lot of publicity this week over hitting the 1,000-episode milestone. Always comparing itself to scripted prime time shows, whether they be “Gunsmoke” or “The Simpsons” or other shows that remained ratings hits for decades, the reality is that sports programming, unlike scripted shows, can last forever. The NFL and MLB have been consistently on national television since the 50s and nobody really calls any attention to milestones. Similarly, pro wrestling has been successful on U.S. television since Gorgeous George popularized the medium in the late 1940s.


****************************************************************
Running 19 years, Raw would be among the longer lasting wrestling shows in history, but far from the longest.

The problem with saying that, is where Raw really stands is more based on how you choose to categorize things.

Almost every city of any size has consistently had pro wrestling on television since the advent of independent stations in the late 50s or early 60s, until the deaths of the territories, mostly in the late 80s. In many cases, the promotions and stations changed. However, Raw also changed stations during its run, but kept its name and never went off the air.

Verne Gagne’s AWA All-Star Wrestling show started with him as promoter in 1960, and lasted 30 years until the promotion closed, in the home Minneapolis market. Similarly, Championship Wrestling from Florida was in every major city in the state from 1961 until the promotion closed in 1987.

One of the most popular and highly-rated wrestling shows was the St. Louis based Wrestling at the Chase, which debuted on May 23, 1959. The show got its name because it was originally taped at the ritzy Chase Hotel, with the shows in the early years featuring performers like Dick the Bruiser and Gene Kiniski brawling at the Khorrasan Room, while an older upper class skewing audience, men in suits and ties, and women in evening gowns, hosted by Joe Garagiola, looked more like a crowd at an opera than a sporting event.

In the seal of approval, the site of the NXT show is in . The St. Louis Wrestling Club was owned about 51% by Sam Muchnick, until January 1, 1982, when he retired and sold his interest to Bob Geigel, Harley Race, Pat O’Connor and Verne Gagne, who within two years drove ratings so far down the station had decided not to cancel the show, but have a new promotion in the time slot.

The choice came down to local promoter Larry Matysik, known locally as the voice of wrestling and Muchnick’s longtime assistant, who had quit the promotion in early 1983 and started running on his own, and Vince McMahon, who at the time had not yet let the world know he was planning on going national. McMahon was running in the Northeast, but had also started running shows in Los Angeles and San Jose, markets that opened up when Mike LeBell shut down his promotion.

The name was such an institution locally that when McMahon struck a deal to get the time slot, by offering KPLR-TV, $2,100 per week (previously KPLR had paid for production of the local show in exchange for a percentage of house show revenue, and the WWF deal included 5% of all local house shows), he called the WWF syndicated show, “Wrestling at the Chase” instead of “Superstars,” in the market, at least through the end of 1986, if not longer. Wrestling remained on the station until the early 90s, when they finally canceled WWF wrestling due to poor ratings. So did the show last 24 years, 26 years, or 34 years? During that period, the show had several time slot changes, but may have been the longest running show on the same station in pro wrestling history.

Similarly, 25-year-old Lance Russell began announcing pro wrestling in Memphis in 1951 on local television. He remained a fixture on the air in that city for nearly 40 years, until signing with WCW in early 1989. And after his WCW deal expired in 1992, he returned to host Memphis Wrestling until a falling out with the promotion in 1997. During that period, the show bounced around different stations. It was on Ch. 13 in Memphis as far back as anyone could remember. In 1977, when Jerry Jarrett opened up opposition to Nick Gulas, he brought Russell with him and they moved wrestling to Ch. 5, where the studio wrestling show remained until Jarrett sold the promotion, and eventually went out of business. So, as far as Championship Wrestling, the name of the television show was concerned, is that 46 years or just the 20-year Jarrett run and the 26-year Nick Gulas promotion run? In this case, I’d argue the latter because they were two different promotions.

Vince McMahon Sr. was taping regular wrestling shows from the mid-50s until he sold the promotion to his son in 1982. There were various wrestling television shows on in Los Angeles from 1947 to 1975, although with different names, different time slots and on different stations.

Generally, the three shows that are talked about as the longest running wrestling shows in history, whether this is accurate or not, would be Houston Wrestling, Portland Wrestling and Georgia/World Championship Wrestling/WCW Saturday Night.

Raw may be able to claim to be the longest running national weekly episodic television show in U.S. history if it wasn’t for wrestling on TBS.

Beginning under the name Georgia Championship Wrestling, later being renamed World Championship Wrestling and then WCW Saturday Night, the Saturday 6-8 p.m. Eastern time block on TBS is listed as one of the longest running national television shows in U.S. history. But there are two questions regarding how long this would be.

For one, what was the starting point? WTCG, Ch. 17 in Atlanta, owned by Ted Turner, became the first national SuperStation in January 1976. Georgia Championship Wrestling was the first, hit on the station, and its highest rated show for the next several years as more and more cable companies picked the channel up. At its peak, in 1981, the show averaged a 6.4 rating on Saturday and a 6.6 on Sunday (ironically Saturday was the first-run show and Sunday was highlights of usually the previous week plus tapes of wrestlers headed to Georgia from other territories), and for years was the highest rated show on cable television.

The channel later changed its call letters to WTBS, and later was just known as the TBS SuperStation.

I couldn’t even tell you when Georgia Championship Wrestling started. It was on WQXI-TV in Atlanta for years, likely from the late 50s or early 60s under promoter Paul Jones. Ray Gunkel, who was running the promotion, struck a deal in late 1971 to move the show to Turner’s WTCG, where it debuted on December 25, 1971. The show remained on the channel until June 24, 2000, through several ownership changes, when it ran its final Saturday night broadcast.

The promotion changed its name first in 1972 after Gunkel died, when the other partners on ABC Promotions tried to shut his widow out of the company which led to a major wrestling war. Without missing a beat, the new company was named Georgia Championship Wrestling, Inc.

What was notable about that show is in November, 1972, almost the entire roster of Georgia Championship Wrestling, with the exception of Bob Armstrong and Darrell Cochrane, quit the promotion. In a major story on Thanksgiving morning, just hours before GCW’s biggest show of the year, it was announced almost the entire roster was going with Ann Gunkel, Ray’s widow, for her new promotion, All South Wrestling.

A consortium of NWA promoters moved in, spearheaded by Eddie Graham, and sent talent that night into Atlanta so they could run a show. They put Bill Watts in charge of booking and rebuilt the promotion with Florida stars like Jack Brisco, Buddy Colt as well as the return of Tim “Mr. Wrestling” Woods, who was the area’s most popular wrestler a few years earlier when he quit over feeling cheated on a payoff when he larger than usual house for his challenge to NWA champion Gene Kiniski. As it turned out, the biggest enduring star was journeyman wrestler John Walker, in his early 40s and looking older, whose career appeared to be almost finished. He donned the mask and became Mr. Wrestling II, and had a second career, far more successful than his first.

What was unique about the war from late 1972 into 1974, is that GCW had its television deal with Turner’s station. But Ann Gunkel, who had a close relationship with Turner, was also able to get her show on the station.

The Atlanta promotional war was among the most bitter and dirtiest in history. But every Saturday morning, almost like the practice sessions between rival teams on The Ultimate Fighter, one group of wrestlers would finish their show, clean up and the other promotion would come in the doors ready to film their show. Not only that, but the two shows aired one after the other, from 6-8 p.m. When Gunkel’s promotion folded in 1974, both hours went to Georgia Championship Wrestling and were produced as two different shows. That explains why, for years, Gordon Solie would sign off at 7:04 p.m., the show would end, the opening theme music would play again, and Solie would welcome people to a show that had already been on for an hour. And frequently, wrestlers who worked the first hour would wrestle on the second hour, as they were treated as if they were completely different shows.

Jim Barnett was brought in to run the company in 1973 partially because he knew and was willing to do any dirty tactic known to mankind to destroy Gunkel. Barnett ran the company until he was forced out by Ole Anderson in 1982.

In 1984, the majority of stockholders, behind Anderson’s back, in one of wrestling’s best-kept secrets, sold the company to Vince McMahon. After a court case where they ruled that McMahon had legally purchased the company, Georgia Championship Wrestling folded. The TV show, which had already had a name change to World Championship Wrestling, continued in a new format, which was WWF tapes being sent in. A year later, when Turner was going to cancel the show due to declining ratings and being upset McMahon wasn’t taping the show in Atlanta at his studios, McMahon sold the time slot to Jim Crockett for $1 million. Crockett ran from 1985 to 1988 on the station, and then, deeply in debt, sold the company to Turner Broadcasting. But the show ran in the Saturday night time slot on the station for 28 years, of which 24 of those years it was a national show. Going weekly for 28 years would be about 1,480 episodes on the same station. On a national basis, the show did about 1,275 episodes.

Raw will not be what it always claims to be, the longest running weekly episodic national television show in history until November 2017. But if you take the term literally, since they never use the term national, it will not even be the longest running pro wrestling show on television until 2032 at the earliest.

But Raw’s 1,000 number includes five years on TNN, so if you include the WQXI years, since the show was called Georgia Championship Wrestling, it’s closer to 40 years and more than 2,000 episodes. The show died several months before WCW shut down, since they already had Thunder on Thursdays on TBS to go along with Nitro, the Saturday night show had, from 1995 on with the rise of Nitro, become an afterthought. Ratings dwindled, falling as low as a 1.3, since the big names almost never appeared on the show, and there was really no reason to continue it.

Promoter Don Owen debuted on television in Portland, OR, on July 10, 1953, with a show called Heidelberg Wrestling, on KPTV, named after its sponsor, the Heidelberg Brewing Company. In 1955, the same show switched stations to KOIN, and changed its name to Portland Wrestling. It returned to KPTV in 1967, using the name Portland Wrestling, until being canceled at the end of 1991, when WWF struck a deal with the station. Like in St. Louis, instead of paying for production of a weekly show, KPTV was able to get a tape of wrestling sent in, and get paid for the time. Don Owen’s leading sponsor, a local furniture and appliance dealer, declaring bankruptcy also led to the show’s demise at that time, but the truth is, even if Tom Peterson hadn’t had financial issues, the economics of wrestling for a local television station and do run a regional promotion had changed. It was only a question of when, as the show’s death at that time was an inevitability.

But it ran 38 years uninterrupted on Saturday nights, roughly 2,000 episodes. For much of that period, the show ran live matches in prime time from the 3,000-seat converted bowling alley that Owen owned and renamed the Portland Sports Arena. In the late 70s, the show moved to 11:30 p.m., airing on a few hour tape delay.

The longest running pro wrestling show in U.S. history when it comes to a show for the entire time being run by the same promotion was likely Houston Wrestling, promoted by the Gulf Athletic Club. The show went on the air just as television was starting in the city in 1948, under the name Texas Rasslin. In its first ten or so years, the show not only ran on the station, but was syndicated all over the country. Texas became known for a bloody brawling style of wrestling, which also featured a heavy dose of Lucha Libre, since Hispanic stars like Rito Romero (who popularized the upside down surfboard, known as the Rito Romero special), Blackie Guzman, Pepper Gomez and later Jose Lothario were the show’s flagship stars. It was never as national as the Chicago or Los Angeles wrestling shows in the early 50s that were on network stations, but it was in a lot of markets at least through the late 50s.

Houston Wrestling started on KLEE (later KPRC), before switching to KHTV in 1967. The show remained on the air through the summer of 1987, a 39-year-run. Paul Boesch, who hosted the show through its entire run, had a “39 on 39" slogan during the last year. Boesch, who had been a wrestling star in the 30s and 40s, suffered injuries that cut down his wrestling and he became a booker and television announcer, and top assistant to promoter Morris Sigel. He took over as promoter in 1966. Houston Wrestling for most of its run would air 90 minutes of action on Saturday nights from the Friday night house show each week at the Sam Houston Coliseum. In the 80s, when Boesch sold a percentage of the office to Bill Watts and became affiliated with Mid South Wrestling, the TV consisted of the 60 minute Mid South show with localized promos Boesch would do at the arenas and one or two matches from the local house shows to fill the other half hour. The block became two hours in 1985.

The death of that show came over a series of situations. In 1987, with business in Houston being at its weakest point in anyone’s memory, tensions between Watts and Boesch had heightened. Watts sold his promotion to Jim Crockett Jr., and Boesch was not even informed of it until the deal was finalized. Miffed that Crockett Jr. didn’t call him personally, which he should have, Boesch instead made a deal to affiliate with Vince McMahon. But once he made the deal, it went downhill fast. The two men had entirely different philosophies on what pro wrestling was, made worse by the fact there were so many no-shows on the WWF shows in Houston. Boesch came from the school where you don’t false advertise and there was nothing worse than no-shows. He wanted out, and announced his retirement and promoted his final show in August 1987. Ironically, the very weekend of his retirement, he spoke to the station about eventually trying to get something going. It wasn’t long after his retirement that Boesch struck a deal with Crockett, but he refused to allow himself to be called the promoter in Houston because if would have broken his word about retiring. He passed away in 1989 at the age of 76.


******************************************************************

BIGGEST MOMENTS IN RAW HISTORY (PART ONE, 1993-1999)
May 17, 1993: In a taping at the Manhattan Center, there were actually two of the biggest moments of the early history of Raw. Marty Jannetty, who had been fired from the promotion months earlier after showing up passed out at the Royal Rumble in January, returned out of nowhere and won the Intercontinental title from Shawn Michaels in what was the first truly great match on the show.

The same night saw the angle that put the 1-2-3 Kid (Sean Waltman) on the map when he pinned Razor Ramon (Scott Hall). Waltman, known as The Lightning Kid, was actually a pushed star on the Global Wrestling Federation television show where he had that company’s best matches against Jerry Lynn, who he broke in with. He was brought to WWF in the role of a jobber who got no offense, given a different name each week. He got little offense on Ramon before hitting a moonsault block and getting the three count. While the job guy scoring an upset over an established heel was a gimmick that went back decades, it was not something that was part of the WWF’s playbook. The angle has been copied a million times, but none of them are remembered as well.

November 20, 1995: In one of the biggest angles of its time, Michaels was wrestling Owen Hart on a live Raw and collapsed in the ring. The show portrayed it as if Michaels was close to death as he didn’t move, playing on the fact Michaels had taken a savage beating from some marines outside a night club in Syracuse, NY a few months earlier which forced him to vacate the IC title. Fans were told that Michaels had suffered brain injuries that wound end his career, but of course, like all good babyfaces, he came back, in this case, several weeks later. When he did, for the first time in his career he was a genuine drawing card, which built to his winning the WWF title from Bret Hart at the subsequent WrestleMania in Anaheim. The company had gone through several straight years of poor attendance, but the Michaels comeback and Hart’s WWF title win over Kevin Nash, which took place the night before, saw business immediately pick up substantially and the worst drawing period in company history was over.

March 31, 1997: Bret Hart, who had been the company’s top babyface since his return from a hiatus in the fall of 1996, had turned heel at WrestleMania a week earlier in an I Quit match with Steve Austin, where Austin turned face. Hart then did an interview, where he turned on the American wrestling fans, while saying he still respected the Canadian and European fans. At that point Hart asked his family members, brother Owen, who he had feuded with for years, and Davey Boy Smith, who he had also feuded with, to join him in forming a new Hart Foundation. This led to the U.S. vs. Canada feud, with Bret and Austin as the focal points, where the babyfaces changed each week depending upon what city Raw was coming from. The feud was the beginning of a turnaround of a stagnant product.

August 11, 1997: While the Hart Foundation vs. Steve Austin remained the top feud, Shawn Michaels had turned heel on Undertaker and joined up with Hunter Hearst Helmsley, and his bodyguard, the jacked up female Chyna, to form Degeneration X. Complete with an innovative entrance video, DX quickly became the hottest heel act in years, to the point that at the end of the year, on two straight nights, fans became so unruly at shows that they had to stop the shows before a main event took place because fans hated Michaels that much.

Eventually the group, which later brought in two undercard acts going nowhere who started hitting it big with a sing-along ring entrance, The New Age Outlaws (taken from the late 60s and early 70s Outlaws tag team of Dick Murdoch & Dusty Rhodes) of Road Dogg Jesse James & Bad Ass Billy Gunn joined the group, as did Sean Waltman, as X-Pac.

January 19, 1998: If you had to pick one moment where the momentum in the Monday Night Wars switched, it was, with a ring filled with people and complete chaos, when Steve Austin and Mike Tyson had a pull-apart brawl. Austin, whose career had nearly ended a few months earlier from an Owen Hart tombstone piledriver, had, while on the shelf, remained on the show doing skits to hide that he couldn’t wrestle. But when he returned, attendance picked up big and he was clearly the company’s biggest drawing card. Austin was a star to wrestling fans, but a complete unknown outside of wrestling. But with that angle, which got coverage all over the world due to Tyson, Austin became the hottest star in wrestling. Before long, Austin was for the next three plus years, a bigger star, when it came to ticket selling and merchandise moving, of any wrestler past, present or future, in history.

April 13, 1998: Even with Austin on fire, and WrestleMania in 1998 doing more buys than any PPV had done since Hulk Hogan vs. Randy Savage nine years earlier, Raw was still losing every week to Nitro. The gap had started closing, but the show that put it over the top was a two-hour build to a match with Austin vs. Vince McMahon. There were segments building to McMahon finally wrestling, with Pat Patterson and Jerry Brisco giving him wrestling tips. The match actually never happened, as Mick Foley as Dude Love saved McMahon, which led to an Austin vs. Dude Love PPV program. Raw beat Nitro for the first time in the ratings since May, 1996. While ratings went back-and-forth until January, 1999, it was clear the momentum was with WWF, and it started the mental destruction of Eric Bischoff and the entire WCW company, even though they were making more money than ever before, they couldn’t mentally handle losing Monday night ratings and hotshotted themselves into oblivion.

July 27, 1998: Perhaps the most shocking moment in the history of Raw was one of the few times they went into the ring without a script. During the height of the Monday Night Wars, everything under the sun was tried, including doing actual legitimate matches, the “Brawl for All” concept. The idea was to do a tournament and not script it, with the idea of creating a tough guy superstar in Steve “Dr. Death” Williams, to set up a program against Steve Austin. To say this concept backfired would be an understatement. A number of wrestlers, including Williams, Savio Vega, Mark Canterbury, Charles Wright and others ended up getting significant injuries. Many wrestlers tough-guy images took a tumble, and even the eventual winner, Bart Gunn, was no longer with the company the next year and whatever he got out of winning was a job with All Japan Pro Wrestling for a few years and a brief career in MMA, which had a limited upside given that he was past the age of 40 when he started. Williams had a reputation as a bar fighter, for his ability to knock people out with one punch from his college days and early career in Mid South Wrestling. He was also a four-time All-American heavyweight wrestler at the University of Oklahoma during perhaps the deepest period of talent ever in the U.S. collegiate heavyweight division. But Williams at this point was 38, hadn’t trained for fighting and his last competitive wrestling match was 16 years earlier. Brawl for All was not MMA, although the idea was taken from MMA and the original choice for referee was John McCarthy (he turned it down, although Danny Hodge was used as the commissioner). It was boxing with oversized gloves, with takedowns legal and worth points, but no ground work. It was somebody’s idea of taking the punching of MMA, eliminating all kicks and submissions, with the idea of no ground work because the wrestling fans may find it boring. The segments were hit-and-miss, as some wrestling crowds hated them, and others liked them. Some matches did not do well in the ratings, but others, like this one, did. In fact, the Williams vs. Gunn match, featuring two guys who normally wouldn’t figure to be over, gained nearly 1 million viewers and was the difference maker in Raw beating Nitro that night. Most remember Gunn knocking Williams out, but the back story made it more interesting. Each had won their first round match in the tournament. Dan Severn, who also won his first round match, was asked to pull out because of the fear he might be the one guy who could beat Williams. Williams had beaten Severn when both were in college, and Severn was 40, but had remained active and competing the entire time. Williams’ body had taken a beating from 16 years of physically tough pro wrestling, working the hard style of Mid South Wrestling and the even harder style of All Japan Pro Wrestling. Williams also had developed a number of drug issues associated with both the pain and partying that were part of being a superstar in Japan, and was clearly past his prime when he came over. Before the match, Gunn told someone in WWF, most stories have it being Jim Ross, although others have said it was really Bruce Prichard (I’ve heard both, Ross certainly makes for a better story), asking if he would get heat for knocking out Williams, since everyone knew Williams was supposed to win. Gunn had won Tough Man contests when he was younger, so had more experience with actual boxing than Williams, who had no boxing training. Throwing punches at guys in bars who don’t know how to fight, and moving in the ring with oversized gloves is something completely different. Still, Williams was winning the fight on points when Gunn surprised Williams with a takedown, and in doing so, Williams completely tore his hamstring. He knew he was done, and had no business coming out for the third round, even though he was ahead, and no ability to move, starting taking a series of punches from Gunn, and was eventually knocked out.

January 4, 1999: What made this show so famous was not anything on Raw, although Mick Foley as Mankind, beating The Rock to win the WWF title was certainly a big deal. It was the words of Tony Schiavone, on Nitro, under orders by Bischoff, to say that Mankind, Mick Foley, who used to wrestle here, will be winning their world title on a taped show, and mocked the decision to make Foley champion, saying, “That’ll put asses in seats.” While Foley had established himself as a main eventer, and his Hell in a Cell match with Undertaker in 1998 was one of the most talked about matches of the decade and maybe in history, he was not the kind of person that anyone would have expected to be world champion. In many ways, Foley’s title win was the first time McMahon made the title an award for loyal service as opposed to it being for the top face or top heel in the company, since clearly those positions were held by Austin and The Rock. At the time of the announcement, roughly 375,000 homes and a total of 600,000 viewers at that moment switched from Nitro to Raw, making it one of the biggest promotional blunders of all-time. Little known is that on that night, Bischoff was asking around whether or not he should announce it on the show, and the consensus was strong that it would be a big mistake. Bischoff usually listened, but this time he didn’t. To understand how big pro wrestling was on that night, Raw set its all-time record rating up to that point, a 5.76, while Nitro did a 4.96. While Mankind beat Rock for the title, WCW did the infamous Hulk Hogan one-finger to the chest title change to Kevin Nash, who had just ended Bill Goldberg’s winning streak. While the big switch of audiences to see Foley win the title is much remembered, what is forgotten is that after Foley won the title, a Goldberg run-in on Nitro and Austin run-in on Raw were going on at the same time for the overrun. Goldberg saw Nitro bring its audience back, going from a 4.6 to a 6.5, taking many of those viewers back from Raw which went from a 5.9 to a 5.1. The growth of the final segment of Nitro, many returning after Foley had won the title, was an incredible 2.1 million viewers, among the biggest growth periods in history. Between the two shows on that night during the overrun, there were 8,642,000 homes and 13,827,000 different viewers watching wrestling. And keep in mind two other factors. There were only 74.5 million homes with cable on that night, compared with more than 99 million today. And going head-to-head with wrestling that night was the Fiesta Bowl game that determined college football’s national championship, which had nearly 30 million viewers.

May 10, 1999: During the height of the Monday Night Wars, with Nitro pre-empted due to the NBA playoffs and Raw having the night to themselves, the show drew a 8.09 rating and 9.2 million viewers, destroying the 1.4 that the NBA playoff game did the same night. The show peaked with a main event of The Rock & Steve Austin & Vince McMahon vs. The Undertaker & HHH & Shane McMahon, which did a 9.17 quarter and 10.4 million viewers.

June 28, 1999: A match where Steve Austin won the WWF title from The Undertaker in Charlotte drew the largest rating and audience to ever witness a pro wrestling match or for that matter, any pro wrestling segment, ever on U.S. cable television. The match did a 9.5 rating, which was 10.72 million viewers. Perhaps the most impressive is that one out of every six television sets in the U.S. that had cable that was on during that time was watching that match. Because for more than a decade, Vince Russo has made it a talking point to say how the “The Is Your Life: Rock,” segment was the highest rated segment in history (it did an 8.4 quarter), to show how skits outdraw matches, it’s become a talking point how that was the highest rated segment in Raw history. Actually there were a handful of different quarter hours that beat that total, including most of the second hour of the May 10, 1999 show.


**************************************************************

MOST MATCHES ON RAW
Source: TheScore.com

HHH: 374

Chris Jericho: 360

Kane: 347

John Cena: 299

Randy Orton: 290

Edge: 277

Big Show: 246

Jeff Hardy: 238

Christian: 227

Shawn Michaels: 221

The Rock: 200

Billy Gunn: 178

X-Pac: 176

Matt Hardy: 175

Bradshaw/JBL: 171

Bubba Ray Dudley: 164

The Miz: 162

Trish Stratus: 160

Test: 160

Undertaker: 159


************************************************************

RAW RATINGS HISTORY (average household rating)
1993-August 1995 numbers unavailable

MONDAY NIGHT WARS ERA

1995 (September though December): 2.38

1996: 2.65

1997 : 2.72

1998: 4.42

1999: 6.07

2000: 5.90

2001: 4.66

2002: 4.14

2003: 3.77

2004: 3.68

2005: 3.82

2006: 3.88

2007: 3.65

2008: 3.28

2009: 3.56

2010: 3.20


****************************************************************

CITIES THAT HAVE HOSTED THE MOST EPISODES OF RAW
New York: 40

Poughkeepsie: 25

Philadelphia: 19

Chicago: 18

Boston: 17

Cleveland: 17

Atlanta: 16

Richmond: 16

Anaheim: 15


**************************************************************

MOST WINS ON RAW
(Thanks to Emerson Whitner)

HHH: 192

Chris Jericho: 166

John Cena: 166

Kane: 163

Randy Orton: 145

Shawn Michaels: 140

Edge: 129

Big Show: 125

Jeff Hardy: 124

The Rock: 107

Billy Gunn: 101

Undertaker: 92

Rob Van Dam: 92

X-Pac: 90

Christian: 87

Trish Stratus: 81

Chris Benoit: 81

Booker T: 77

Kofi Kingston: 75

John Bradshaw Layfield: 74

Batista: 73

Bubba Ray Dudley: 73

Mickie James: 73

Test: 72

Matt Hardy: 72


************************************************************

MOST VARIETY OF GIMMICK MATCHES
Three-way match: 78

Battle Royal: 64

Cage match: 49

Four-way: 31

Lumberjack match: 26

Tables match: 25

Falls count anywhere: 20

Last edited by Clique : 08-19-2012 at 05:10 PM.
Clique is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 03:30 PM   #179 (permalink)
Learning to break kayfabe
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 82
stornyboy 50 - 100
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Sensational thread. Could read this kind of stuff forever. Anymore around WM VI? Would love to read insider scoops around The Ultimate Challenge.
stornyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2012, 11:47 PM   #180 (permalink)
Getting ignored by SCOTT STEINER
 
Forever Unchained's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Ireland.
Posts: 605
Forever Unchained 251 - 500Forever Unchained 251 - 500Forever Unchained 251 - 500
Default Re: 20 years Ago: Wrestling Observer

Quote:
Originally Posted by tlk23 View Post
...If you want to throw in the 25-30 folks on the computer wrestling board I frequent who are very hardcore fans...
Wow, there were internet wrestling boards back in 1988! IWC must be near the oldest online discussion topic.
Forever Unchained is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums
Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2
Powered by vBulletin Copyright 2000-2009 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios