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Old 10-10-2012, 12:59 AM   #3 (permalink)
Greenlawler
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Default Re: Was Bill Watts really that bad?

No of course not, sadly it will probably be another decade before his contributions overshadow his current legacy. Plus we tend to forget he was a darn good wrestler in his day.

We tend to think in terms of the last run. He had plenty of critics then and it was somewhat justified. He was guilty of simply becoming outdated. He was fabulous with Mid-South and the UWF but his booking style did not change while the wrestling world did. This is the downfall of many a coach, manager, or promoter. He also was guilty of a little nepotism which in the wrestling world has always been kind of accepted, but it gets downright ugly when the "son" is not talented. You don't have to know the sport well to know that nepotism cost Verne and more obviously Nick Gulas dearly. Erik Watts was just not talented. Watts also fell into the trap of being obssessed with size and often booked larger men to the detrement of any in ring talent. This did not hurt him in the territory days as many guys just kicked, punched, threw a clothesline, and bodyslammed, but by 1990 that style was out the door. He was also notorious for being hard on the guys backstage, giving fines and not being open to suggestions. Also a trait aceptable when their were plenty of other places to work across the country but not in the WWF/WCW two party era.

However his contributions of an earlier era, like evening the playing field for African Americans, his own great in ring career, innovative shows, and creative angles will probably not be remembered as well until a few years down the road when people look at the sum of a career and not his WCW booking only.

Last edited by Greenlawler : 10-10-2012 at 01:02 AM.
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